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Bailing out of an hiring process?

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 13th, 2017 3:40 pm
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[OP]
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 18, 2006
3190 posts
1942 upvotes
Pothole city

Bailing out of an hiring process?

Hi! I'm looking around for a new job. IT ,Unix, devops. I went for a first interview an hit an home run. I have a second interview with HR next week.
99% sure I could have the job. Problems is, during the first technical interview, I got a lot of info about the benefits.

In short, more hours, OT not paid, pension is a lot less, no premium for being on call.
So unless, they throw a lot of money at me, which they won't, the job is a lot less interesting for me.

I don't want to waste their time... go through the second interview, knowing that I will refuse the job anyway.

Any advice?
__________________________________________________________________
Tesla Model 3 SR+ 95% of the experience for 60% of the money (Quebec price, YMMV)
In the EV world, range is just an expensive option!
Range anxiety is an expensive problem...
29 replies
Deal Addict
Sep 4, 2007
1461 posts
1238 upvotes
Edmonton
Email the following:

Dear Name: Thank you very much for considering me for the position of Job Title with Company Name. However, I would like to withdraw my application for the job. I sincerely appreciate you taking the time to interview me and to share information on the opportunity and your company.

They might call you or ask you why you dropped out. In that case, just say you don't think it's a good fit.
Newbie
Aug 20, 2017
66 posts
37 upvotes
I agree that a simple email will suffice. You should thank them for the opportunity and keep in vague by saying that another opportunity came up that you are strongly considering and for this reason will withdraw your application. I'm sure they won't be heartbroken after one interview, especially since you're next interview is with HR, which is kind of strange.
Deal Addict
Aug 16, 2008
1054 posts
401 upvotes
Markham
what the heck...just say youre not satisfied with the compensation and see if theyll budge, why is everyone telling you to cut ties?
Deal Addict
Oct 6, 2015
2463 posts
1376 upvotes
unowned wrote: what the heck...just say youre not satisfied with the compensation and see if theyll budge, why is everyone telling you to cut ties?
With the huge IT glut and high unemployment (thanks to unabated TFW abuse), there's not much reason for companies to increase compensation simply based on 'the market'. And besides, a single person isn't going to be able to effect an entire cultural shift compensation-wise. If a company isn't pro-active about paying well and getting good people, they're probably going to be quite lacking in other aspects of the relationship.

Its kind of like dating. If the (girl|boy) sitting across the table from you has values that are so dramatically different than your own, or just looks/smells bad, its a lot less painful for all involved simply to walk away early, rather than be forced into doing so much later.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 10, 2005
10022 posts
3508 upvotes
typer100 wrote: Hi! I'm looking around for a new job. IT ,Unix, devops. I went for a first interview an hit an home run. I have a second interview with HR next week.
99% sure I could have the job. Problems is, during the first technical interview, I got a lot of info about the benefits.

In short, more hours, OT not paid, pension is a lot less, no premium for being on call.
So unless, they throw a lot of money at me, which they won't, the job is a lot less interesting for me.

I don't want to waste their time... go through the second interview, knowing that I will refuse the job anyway.

Any advice?
Seems your making a few assumptions so why not just wait until the official offer before making a decision.
“...because most of what we say and do is not essential. If you can eliminate it, you'll have more time and more tranquility. Ask yourself at every moment, is this necessary…” -Marcus Aurelius
[OP]
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 18, 2006
3190 posts
1942 upvotes
Pothole city
maxppp wrote: I agree that a simple email will suffice. You should thank them for the opportunity and keep in vague by saying that another opportunity came up that you are strongly considering and for this reason will withdraw your application. I'm sure they won't be heartbroken after one interview, especially since you're next interview is with HR, which is kind of strange.
Thanks. That 's pretty much what I wrote.
To answer your questions about the second meeting with HR, It's pretty common in the IT world. They usually do a first technical interview to see if you can backup your resume and fit with your team.
__________________________________________________________________
Tesla Model 3 SR+ 95% of the experience for 60% of the money (Quebec price, YMMV)
In the EV world, range is just an expensive option!
Range anxiety is an expensive problem...
[OP]
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 18, 2006
3190 posts
1942 upvotes
Pothole city
burnt69 wrote: With the huge IT glut and high unemployment (thanks to unabated TFW abuse), there's not much reason for companies to increase compensation simply based on 'the market'.
Learn french and move to Mtl :) The average age at my current work place in the IT department is 49.
__________________________________________________________________
Tesla Model 3 SR+ 95% of the experience for 60% of the money (Quebec price, YMMV)
In the EV world, range is just an expensive option!
Range anxiety is an expensive problem...
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
34095 posts
7704 upvotes
East Gwillimbury
typer100 wrote: Learn french and move to Mtl :) The average age at my current work place in the IT department is 49.
Don’t dismiss the old guys. They were there from the beginning of the computer revolution.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 15, 2005
5535 posts
1086 upvotes
Why didn't you discuss salary and benefits more when you were in the first time?

If I saw a red flag like that I would dig deeper to get more info before I left. Interviews are you showcasing yourself to an employer, but it is also your opportunity to learn as much about them as possible too.
Deal Guru
Dec 31, 2005
13306 posts
738 upvotes
Continue to go through the process.
If during negotiations, you cannot find common ground then politely decline. This happens all the time.
Do not forget that benefits are only part of the equation. Make sure that you look at the entire picture.

When you get the offer, then you can sit and have a discussion...put forward asks and requirements for you to leave....but do it politely.

So why go through with it? Well, you never know what will happen. You should always have a number of people you could call to seek out possible employment. Also, companies, always look to have people they could call on short notice. It is just good professionalism.
Newbie
Aug 20, 2017
66 posts
37 upvotes
Gee wrote: Don’t dismiss the old guys. They were there from the beginning of the computer revolution.
You never know when punch cards and COBOL may come back in style!! Grumpy old, formerly technical IT guys are by far my favorite people to work with!
Deal Addict
Aug 16, 2017
1812 posts
889 upvotes
Toronto
why not wait for the offer letter and negotiate the salary/compensation? if they won't budge then don't accept. It's simple, no?
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
34095 posts
7704 upvotes
East Gwillimbury
maxppp wrote: You never know when punch cards and COBOL may come back in style!! Grumpy old, formerly technical IT guys are by far my favorite people to work with!
COBOL will never die. As much as we want it to go away. Just ask any maintenance programmer for a bank

Us old guys remember when there were no pretty interfaces and everything had to be coded
Last edited by Gee on Oct 23rd, 2017 12:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Newbie
Aug 20, 2017
66 posts
37 upvotes
Gee wrote: COBOL will never die. As much as we want it to go away. Just ask any maintenance programmer for a bank

Us old guys remember when there were to pretty interfaces and everything had to be coded
Yeah true enough, word to the COBOLers. COBOL is one of the very few languages to not get offshored dramatically in Canada, while the consulting companies tended to focus on JAVA, ERPs, etc.
Banned
Dec 28, 2015
614 posts
239 upvotes
Westmount, QC
Email saying thank you for consideration but at this time you have decided to pursue other opportunities

It's not hard, I do it all the time
Banned
Dec 28, 2015
614 posts
239 upvotes
Westmount, QC
burnt69 wrote: With the huge IT glut and high unemployment (thanks to unabated TFW abuse), there's not much reason for companies to increase compensation simply based on 'the market'. And besides, a single person isn't going to be able to effect an entire cultural shift compensation-wise. If a company isn't pro-active about paying well and getting good people, they're probably going to be quite lacking in other aspects of the relationship.

Its kind of like dating. If the (girl|boy) sitting across the table from you has values that are so dramatically different than your own, or just looks/smells bad, its a lot less painful for all involved simply to walk away early, rather than be forced into doing so much later.
There is if they are wanting to hire a quality candidate. There big demand for decent IT developers and etc and companies know they will have to pay for it

It's the low value low skilled IT worker's who get the treatment you describe
Deal Addict
Nov 22, 2009
2646 posts
518 upvotes
Toronto
MrWhiteCoffee wrote: There is if they are wanting to hire a quality candidate. There big demand for decent IT developers and etc and companies know they will have to pay for it

It's the low value low skilled IT worker's who get the treatment you describe
When we talk about unemployment rate, it's regarding overall numbers. You can't just say unemployment rate is close to zero for "decent" employees. If you use that as logic, unemployment rate should be ZERO because quality candidates will never be unable to find a good job.
Banned
Dec 28, 2015
614 posts
239 upvotes
Westmount, QC
blitzforce wrote: When we talk about unemployment rate, it's regarding overall numbers. You can't just say unemployment rate is close to zero for "decent" employees. If you use that as logic, unemployment rate should be ZERO because quality candidates will never be unable to find a good job.
Which is why it's a poor indicator for an economy that is focused on and needing quality candidates. There is a huge skills shortage in many sectors for skilled workers. There being many available laid off unskilled/semiskilled manufacturing or retail workers doesn't change that as they can't fill the jobs but show up in overall unemployment rate

We should be happy our economy doesn't need unskilled/semiskilled worker as we aren't a developing country

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