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Becoming a teacher later in life?

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  • Jan 8th, 2020 5:50 pm
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[OP]
Sr. Member
Apr 5, 2009
909 posts
221 upvotes

Becoming a teacher later in life?

My friend is 40 years old in the Corp world, with MBA and 14 years of finance experience. If she got a teacher's degree, would she have as difficult a time finding a job like a new teaching grad?
23 replies
Member
Jan 12, 2011
232 posts
150 upvotes
Toronto
I've read that it mostly depends on where she lives and whether or not she's willing to move.
Deal Addict
Oct 18, 2004
4748 posts
1262 upvotes
Wat
Depends what she wants to teach. I hear there's a need for qualified tech/trade teachers ever since teachers college became a 2 year program. It's hard for someone to take two years off working to go to school. Don't think there's a shortage of business teachers.
Newbie
Dec 27, 2014
95 posts
102 upvotes
Toronto, ON
I started teaching at college, after I retired!

They need people with real life experience and the skills to be able to teach adults.
Deal Addict
Jun 27, 2006
1679 posts
1967 upvotes
WaterBoy49 wrote: I started teaching at college, after I retired!

They need people with real life experience and the skills to be able to teach adults.
+1

Know a few people who are teaching post secondary and their real world insights probably mean more than just going on the teaching plan.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 24, 2007
1457 posts
1679 upvotes
BC
stansoltz wrote: My friend is 40 years old in the Corp world, with MBA and 14 years of finance experience. If she got a teacher's degree, would she have as difficult a time finding a job like a new teaching grad?
You don't need a teacher's degree to be an instructor as colleges and business schools look for communications ability and real-world experience for their business programs not a teaching degree. If she has presentation experience as many in the corporate world do, that is all she really needs. I know of lots of retired professionals that get into part-time teaching.
Sr. Member
Sep 4, 2006
877 posts
533 upvotes
Ottawa
The OP asked about becoming a teacher, and that requires a two year program. A professor or a lecturer does not.
Member
Mar 26, 2013
367 posts
24 upvotes
Calgary
UPEI has a 12 month program too and University of New Brunswick has a 11 month program
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 3, 2009
5775 posts
1092 upvotes
Toronto
Sounds like good volunteer work, cutos to your friend!
Remember to be an RFD-er and NOT a degenerate.
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
3367 posts
1177 upvotes
Woodbridge
Which province? Teaching what?
Deal Addict
Apr 7, 2011
1858 posts
403 upvotes
I looked into it when I was turning 40ish.

It's not particularly easy as you probably don't have the necessary courses to teach in a high school for the most part. Teaching has very specific requirements for what qualifications you need, work experience isn't something that counts outside of the technical courses. E.G. my undergrad engineering degree didn't qualify me to teach science or math on high school. An MBA in a specific stream might qualify.

At the community college level they're looking for doctoral level qualifications, or you better be taking them in a university. That's coming from my one adjunct professor who got a job at Sheridan. She was a CMA with a MBA. That was for full time, adjunct (contract) spots are YMMV.

You can get a qualified teaching degree from places in Buffalo or Detroit (Canasius or D'Youville). There was also Charles Sturt in Burlington. That's in addition to the usual York/ Brock/ etc.

Be wary of the online courses, while you may get a B. Ed. they may not qualify to teach in the high school / K to 8 systems of the public/separate boards.

Private schools have more leeway but the pay is much lower and there's baggage there too.
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
3367 posts
1177 upvotes
Woodbridge
Sum_guy wrote: Private schools have more leeway but the pay is much lower and there's baggage there too.
My response assumes Ontario, and GTA specifically. Not necessarily. A friend of mine used to work at Del (Toronto) and his salary started higher than mine (~$55k), capped slightly lower (~$85k), but he reached his cap faster. Contributions to the teacher's pension plan were identical to mine and benefits were comparable. I know that St. Mike's (unionized) uses the TDSB salary grid in their collective agreement. Some do pay less - Villanova comes to mind. I would imagine that schools like UCC, SAC, Country Day, Crescent etc. have comparable compensation to the public sector to attract skilled candidates. They're charging $35,000+ per kid per year. There are additional responsibilities. For example, my friend was required to coach or supervise at least two clubs and one overnight trip as well as attend various fundraising functions, open houses etc. He also taught classes of 20 with no IEPs. All of this is based on my recollection of how things were several years ago but given the fact that Ontario is looking at a teacher shortage in several areas as a result of the two-year BEd program, private schools need to be competitive. I'll also note that private schools don't require their teachers to be members of the Ontario College of Teachers. Several of my friend's colleagues had advanced degrees and worked without having teaching credentials. All were alumni of the school, so there's that, and I believe a few of them were in the process of getting their BEd.
Deal Addict
Mar 10, 2011
2272 posts
402 upvotes
Toronto
OP, how badly does your friend want the teaching career? Only asking because anecdotally, 2 of 3 young teachers that I know of are having difficulty landing steady supply teaching work 3-4 years after graduating never mind a permanent position. I have a teacher friend who retired after age 55 and he still supply teaches a few days a week and this is common for many teachers who have retired. So this makes it even more difficult for new teachers to break into the field.
If your friend has a real passion for teaching and would leave no stone unturned looking for employment, it might still be a good idea. If this is just an idea that popped in her head, then she should consider that it may be difficult to get a position at first and may have to struggle for awhile.
Additionally one of the best benefits of being a teacher is the excellent pension plan, however at your friends age, she would not get a full pension unless she plans on teaching for many years beyond age 55.
Moderator
May 28, 2012
11148 posts
3280 upvotes
Saskatoon
Not sure if it's possible these days, but observing/volunteering in a classroom will give her some perspective into the teaching profession. I know a couple of people who never went into teaching after they earned their degree (personal choice, not failure to find employment). In the larger centres, I think having the right connections help a lot.
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User avatar
Dec 21, 2007
1152 posts
101 upvotes
Markham
Wiseman wrote: Depends what she wants to teach. I hear there's a need for qualified tech/trade teachers ever since teachers college became a 2 year program. It's hard for someone to take two years off working to go to school. Don't think there's a shortage of business teachers.
Actually there is a shortage of business teachers. Many business teachers are older and many faculties have stopped offering business as a teachable.
Sr. Member
Jun 10, 2013
588 posts
255 upvotes
French Immersion = no problem at all, crazy shortages - I keep reading articles about increasing demand for 'streaming' and program delays/closures since they can't find teachers. I've known of teachers on the supply/LTO list to up to a decade (but graduated before that 2-year requirement came into effect). With Ford going gung-ho on austerity, I can't imagine it being a good time. I've seen firings but only in the high school space.

Hopefully after 14 years in the corporate sector she'd have ample savings to generate returns to offset the salary losses. If that's the case, a late start doesn't really matter. A DB pension also counts for a lot too, and the benefits, and the almost 3 months off during the year.

Yeah NB/PEI/(and UBC apparently?) have 1-year programs. It is better off to do those to minimize opportunity costs, you'll probably want to look at license transferability between the provinces - I can't imagine this being a huge issue but I'm not in the industry.
Sr. Member
Jun 10, 2013
588 posts
255 upvotes
To answer your question, teaching is a seniority based job in public schools lol...make of that what you will...I suspect she'll graduate like everyone else and find jobs like everyone else, what will distinguish her are her teachables and the supply/demand situation of those teachables. It doesn't look like a pleasant market, unless you know French of course...I've seen math teachers dicked around, but at least they have jobs...
I wouldn't be too hung up on the late start. If you feel like shooting yourself in your old job and teaching would make you happy (and can meet your financial requirements (along with a DB pension (works on factor 85)), then it's not a bad decision. Teachers do make bank after a decade (assuming you're not frozen on the grid as teachers were under Bob Rae).
Sr. Member
Nov 16, 2013
698 posts
195 upvotes
GTA
Good to know. How do you find such jobs which can be part time as well. I have been in corporate world and would like to contribute by sharing my experiences.
I do not such positions online to apply

WaterBoy49 wrote: I started teaching at college, after I retired!

They need people with real life experience and the skills to be able to teach adults.
Newbie
Dec 27, 2014
95 posts
102 upvotes
Toronto, ON
vivmk20 wrote: Good to know. How do you find such jobs which can be part time as well. I have been in corporate world and would like to contribute by sharing my experiences.
I do not such positions online to apply

It's just a question of keeping an eye out for those jobs, keep your contacts in mind and network as much as you can.

I found my teaching job on indeed believe it or not!

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