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Airthings Wave 2 Wireless Radon Gas Detector, $199.99

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Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 2, 2012
3982 posts
3024 upvotes
KINGSTON,ON
laurentbm wrote: Is your exhaust at ground level, or did they make a stack go up over the roof line? From what I've been seeing, they frequently do the former in Canada, but I believe the latter is EPA regulation / code in the United States. Just curious. Flirting with the idea of installing my own mitigation system.
Various jurisdictions in the US have different regulations. I'm guessing this is to prevent backdrafting into windows. IMHO, it would make more sense to limit the distance to openable windows, like gas appliance venting is.
I vented mine at about 18 inches ground level. My reasoning is, there is a huge amount of moisture being pulled out with the air. All that moisture going 30' up a pipe in winter is going to frost up on the inside of the pipe. When the temperature goes above freezing, all that water is going to back flow down the pipe. If your pipe is sloped upwards, the fan is going to be flooded. The fans explicitly state they are not designed to handle liquid.
Last winter during an extended deep freeze period, there was a massive frost build up in the area around my exit pipe. Unfotunately I have no images of that.
Because a large section of my venting runs through my cold cellar, which can drop to freezing, I put a bypass at my fan. Here's the link to the post I made. Your text to link here...

Some US rules state that the fan must also be located outdoors. Again. IMHO, that's a death sentence in -25C.
Newbie
May 23, 2019
18 posts
14 upvotes
Amazon now has the Wave 2 for $179.42 - it's not a Prime Day deal so no need to be a Prime member.
Jr. Member
Jun 24, 2013
198 posts
232 upvotes
I have the Wave Plus. We also have kids sleeping in rooms in the basement.

Our average annual average was 135 Bq/m^3 - above WHO guidelines but below Health Canada. We did have peaks close to 300 Bq/m^3

I just installed a radon mitigation system (~$600 all in parts, fan, including the $100 I paid to rent the 5" concrete drill from Home Depot). It was an easy install and today I have a reading of 3 Bq/m^3 - it's working great and I wouldn't have known without the radon detector - I've spend $300 in worse ways (both in one shot and cumulatively). This price is worth it if you don't have one.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Sep 14, 2007
957 posts
404 upvotes
Calgary, AB
nagooro wrote: I used the Airthings Home (not the wave), picked it up for $150 on sale at home depot. I only measured it for a week or so before I started getting quotes. Levels were high enough that they likely would not drop substantially. After 1 month of measuring, they were still averaging around the same levels. Basement was 400-500. Main floor around 350-400. Pucks are supposed to be more accurate and used for a long term test, but the radon companies I got quotes from said the Airthings monitors work exceptionally well for quick readings.

I got quotes from 4 of the major radon mitigators (calgary). Quotes ranged from $1800-2300. I did have a rough in for the exhaust/intake. They used the rough in going below the foundation, but replaced the exhaust to a properly rated one for outdoors.

I paid $2k all in, took about 6 hours for the install. Levels are now averaging ~30ish.

I'm sure with a few hours of my time and maybe $600 I could have done a DIY, but they did a lot of diagnostics for air pressures and sealed up any leaks in my finished basement. Plus, I aint the greatest DIY'er so for peace of mind just had it done properly.

For those that aren't familiar with radon mitigation, its basically PVC piping running from below the foundation, exhausting outside. A small fan runs 24/7 and sucks the air below the foundation, tosses it outside.


Image
Looks like it terminates out the side of the home? When I install these systems, I pipe it up through the roof. You want to get it as far away from your exterior envelope as possible.

What neighbourhood/quadrant are you in, if you don't mind my asking?
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
18048 posts
20381 upvotes
GTA
ecobuilder wrote: Looks like it terminates out the side of the home? When I install these systems, I pipe it up through the roof. You want to get it as far away from your exterior envelope as possible.

What neighbourhood/quadrant are you in, if you don't mind my asking?
You do want it as high a possible to prevent anyone from breathing the exhaust, but in cold areas they say there are issues with condensation freezing if you run the pipe outside to the roof. If you pipe up through the interior, then there are risks where there could be a leak in the pipe joints above the fan, where it would be pressurized, so ideally the the fan should be as close to the exterior end of the pipe as possible.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.
Jr. Member
Jun 24, 2013
198 posts
232 upvotes
I vented mine out the sidewall, not using the specific sidewall fan, just a RadonAway one. I was concerned about the noise level of the Tjernlund unit.

My RadonAway fan (RP 140) is the smallest and most energy efficient - it only produces the slightest whirr inside the house, and if you weren't listening for it you can barely hear it - and outside it just sounds like a dryer venting.

I referenced this document Your text to link here...

Chapter 9 (p. 44) is where it starts talking about venting. On p. 46 there is a chart about gas burning applicance venting and the suggestion is that if this is good enough for gas burning appliances, it should be good enough for radon mitigation.

I moved my Wave Plus to the window closest to where I am venting (the same location where my gas appliances used to vent because the holes had already been started) and I'm not getting any radon back into the house or at least the levels are low enough - average of about 10 Bq/m^3, down from an average of 135 and a weekly average over 200 - that I'm not too worried about it.

I should also mention that I have no concerns about mitigating or worrying about back drafting as my heating and hot water are electric heat pump based. We have no gas appliances in the house at all. I also have a ventless dryer.
Newbie
Dec 24, 2018
22 posts
9 upvotes
nagooro wrote: I used the Airthings Home (not the wave), picked it up for $150 on sale at home depot. I only measured it for a week or so before I started getting quotes. Levels were high enough that they likely would not drop substantially. After 1 month of measuring, they were still averaging around the same levels. Basement was 400-500. Main floor around 350-400. Pucks are supposed to be more accurate and used for a long term test, but the radon companies I got quotes from said the Airthings monitors work exceptionally well for quick readings.



I got quotes from 4 of the major radon mitigators (calgary). Quotes ranged from $1800-2300. I did have a rough in for the exhaust/intake. They used the rough in going below the foundation, but replaced the exhaust to a properly rated one for outdoors.

I paid $2k all in, took about 6 hours for the install. Levels are now averaging ~30ish.

I'm sure with a few hours of my time and maybe $600 I could have done a DIY, but they did a lot of diagnostics for air pressures and sealed up any leaks in my finished basement. Plus, I aint the greatest DIY'er so for peace of mind just had it done properly.

For those that aren't familiar with radon mitigation, its basically PVC piping running from below the foundation, exhausting outside. A small fan runs 24/7 and sucks the air below the foundation, tosses it outside.


Image
Hi,
Just wonder how big is the cavity you dug under the slab? Thanks
Sr. Member
Sep 26, 2015
608 posts
311 upvotes
Hancerx wrote: Hi,
Just wonder how big is the cavity you dug under the slab? Thanks
We built our home in 2017 and the builder put in a rough in for the radon mitigation. I believe it's just a pvc pipe that goes vertically down maybe 2-3ft, then slopes downwards at a slight angle towards center of the home.
Deal Addict
Jan 25, 2008
2251 posts
2151 upvotes
Montréal
Btw I did the city thing. It’s pretty annoying. You have to set it in one spot for 90 days without being near a ceiling, a floor or a wall and then send it to a lab. Testing multiple spots is out of the question. It’s a pita , it uses an acustar device
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2005
4535 posts
1824 upvotes
WFH
nagooro wrote: We built our home in 2017 and the builder put in a rough in for the radon mitigation. I believe it's just a pvc pipe that goes vertically down maybe 2-3ft, then slopes downwards at a slight angle towards center of the home.
Interesting that the rough in goes toward the center. I see plenty pics of installations at a perimeter wall or even at a corner but this placement never made much sense to me apart from making venting through a wall easier.
Sr. Member
Sep 26, 2015
608 posts
311 upvotes
dirtmover wrote: Interesting that the rough in goes toward the center. I see plenty pics of installations at a perimeter wall or even at a corner but this placement never made much sense to me apart from making venting through a wall easier.
I believe the piping terminates closer to the center of the home so the vacuum can suck up air from a larger area below the home. If the vacuum was just in one corner, it would likely have a harder time sucking up air from a corner on the opposite side of the house. This is one of the diagnostics they run, to ensure wherever the fan is placed, it will suck air from the farthest corners of the home.
Member
Apr 2, 2009
296 posts
344 upvotes
vancouver
dirtmover wrote: Interesting that the rough in goes toward the center. I see plenty pics of installations at a perimeter wall or even at a corner but this placement never made much sense to me apart from making venting through a wall easier.
Building code for new construction (In BC, other provinces probably same) requires a min. 4" continuous non-crushed gravel below the basement or crawl slab, and a 4" PVC pipe that terminates somewhere in that gravel (not all regions require it to terminate in the approx center of the slab since the gravel is continuous anyway). There's a lot of variables in a retrofit situation - key being age of home, but terminating in the center of the slab would be more effective in this scenario since there's likely little to no gravel and possibly no vapour barrier so it will pull more evenly from the extents of the foundation.
I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2005
4535 posts
1824 upvotes
WFH
baudfather wrote: Building code for new construction (In BC, other provinces probably same) requires a min. 4" continuous non-crushed gravel below the basement or crawl slab, and a 4" PVC pipe that terminates somewhere in that gravel (not all regions require it to terminate in the approx center of the slab since the gravel is continuous anyway). There's a lot of variables in a retrofit situation - key being age of home, but terminating in the center of the slab would be more effective in this scenario since there's likely little to no gravel and possibly no vapour barrier so it will pull more evenly from the extents of the foundation.
Ah yes, I was thinking more retrofit. I'm not sure how effectively my slab is sealed at the perimeter and want to avoid removing drywall if at all possible so I suspect extracting from closet to the center is likely going to be most effective. First things first though, I need to seal the sump.

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