Expired Hot Deals

[Best Buy] D-Link mydlink Wi-Fi Smart Water Sensor (DCH-S161) $39.99

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 11th, 2019 7:22 pm
Deal Addict
Nov 6, 2018
3429 posts
2437 upvotes
er34er34 wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2019 8:42 am
Water alarm has saved my butt many times over the years.. mine aren't smart sensors, but they have been more than worth it. $40 a piece is a bit steep though, as it buys about 4 non-smart sensors but I get that it gives extra peace of mind if you are away for extended periods.

1. Fridge icemaker line(1/4 pex) leak that miraculously leaked into the laundry room directly underneath(the water line is tee-ed from below). Had a water sensor in laundry room by the drain and it went off.

2. Water heater slow leak, again caught by the sensor.

3. Dishwasher drain pipe crack.
Now they just need smart sensors that have a little camera that get activated when the sensor goes off so instead of trying to describe the disaster to the plumber in the phone they can understand the bigger picture right away (pun intended)
Member
Nov 15, 2012
236 posts
158 upvotes
Mississauga
If you have smartthings, you need just cheap sensors like Xiaomi Aqara. I have these at all the locations in my home where there is a possibility of a leak. They go around $10-15 on Chinese websites like GB, Aliexpress. Lots of times they go on sale too.
Deal Addict
Apr 4, 2007
3773 posts
1308 upvotes
Montreal
Sling wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2019 8:42 am
Any reason why this one wouldn't be better if I have the smart things hub?

https://www.thesource.ca/en-ca/smart-ho ... /108078694
I have one of these and it works well. It's cheaper on amazon: https://www.amazon.ca/Samsung-SmartThin ... b_title_hi
I also have several of the older generation ones. The new ones have a really clever design where they have two sets of sensors - one on the bottom + one on top in a recessed area that is perfect for catching slow drips from plumbing above.
I see no reason to pay more for this one if you have the ST hub (or plan to get one).
Deal Addict
Apr 4, 2007
3773 posts
1308 upvotes
Montreal
nmitrik wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2019 8:52 am
If you have smartthings, you need just cheap sensors like Xiaomi Aqara. I have these at all the locations in my home where there is a possibility of a leak. They go around $10-15 on Chinese websites like GB, Aliexpress. Lots of times they go on sale too.
Be warned that these do not work well if you have the Samsung Connect Home hub - they quickly lose connection to your network, which makes them useless.
Member
Dec 13, 2005
337 posts
27 upvotes
Mono, Ontario
whats the lowest price you have seen these?
Jr. Member
Jun 9, 2008
119 posts
24 upvotes
Ottawa
Anyone wanna pm me for the source psp sign up :) been looking around and haven’t found how...
Member
User avatar
Dec 11, 2004
201 posts
16 upvotes
nmitrik wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2019 8:52 am
If you have smartthings, you need just cheap sensors like Xiaomi Aqara. I have these at all the locations in my home where there is a possibility of a leak. They go around $10-15 on Chinese websites like GB, Aliexpress. Lots of times they go on sale too.
Don't you also need to purchase a gateway for these to work?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 10, 2004
3724 posts
1112 upvotes
Edmonton
GT!! wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2019 9:41 am
I have one of these and it works well. It's cheaper on amazon: https://www.amazon.ca/Samsung-SmartThin ... b_title_hi
I also have several of the older generation ones. The new ones have a really clever design where they have two sets of sensors - one on the bottom + one on top in a recessed area that is perfect for catching slow drips from plumbing above.
I see no reason to pay more for this one if you have the ST hub (or plan to get one).
Lowes also sells these now for $29, so at least you should be able to score %10-15 off depending on the sale. I noticed the whole smart things display there now so they have all the hubs and sensors, etc.
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User avatar
Aug 9, 2007
1077 posts
431 upvotes
frugalcanuck wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2019 2:59 am
You're looking at the AC powered model. One of the knocks is that it requires AC, lol. The battery powered model is here and has 4 star rating, https://www.amazon.ca/D-Link-DCH-S161-S ... ter+sensor. If concerned about software, use IFTTT.

Speeed, you can use this anywhere you have concerns about water leaks, hot water tank, clothes\dish washer, etc. I'm a bit paranoid about water damage, so want to test out this sensor.
Why would people dislike AC? Fear of tripping the breaker? Personally I would prefer not having to change the batteries, and many water source concerns are near outlets (behind fridge, behind washing machine, etc). Maybe not common under sinks.
Jr. Member
Aug 5, 2015
123 posts
110 upvotes
Toronto, ON
One of the best investments ever altho I have the AC version.

My rental water heater leaked overnight and I got an alert on my phone at 3AM because of it. I was able to stop it without any significant damage and booked "Reliance" right away. It's a great peace of mind device.

Only complaint i have is the length of the water sensor cable. But I got some extension cable (search youtube for extension hack)... and was able to cover a 5m area with 1 device.
Deal Addict
Apr 4, 2007
3773 posts
1308 upvotes
Montreal
Drizzt wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2019 11:14 am
Why would people dislike AC? Fear of tripping the breaker? Personally I would prefer not having to change the batteries, and many water source concerns are near outlets (behind fridge, behind washing machine, etc). Maybe not common under sinks.
I see a few possible disadvantages of AC-powered:
- no protection during power failures (although water continues to flow …). However, for this to be a valid argument one would need to have battery and/or emergency power for your other equipment that the water sensor relies on (network, hubs, etc.).
- running power cords is a PITA. It's not going to look pretty in the bathroom. I don't think there is a power outlet that's even close to the water leak sensors I've installed.

Battery life on most of the newer sensors is in excess of 2 years … hardly seems like a chore to me. You should be testing them more frequently than that anyway!
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 8, 2009
1238 posts
299 upvotes
Brampton
So this is only beneficial if you are physically present in the house to turn off water. How can you prevent flooding if the sensor alerts you and you are on a vacation in a far off place or even at work when no one is in the house.

Is there any way to turn off the water remotely.
Jr. Member
Mar 23, 2017
104 posts
65 upvotes
dealerguy wrote:
Jan 2nd, 2019 11:47 am
So this is only beneficial if you are physically present in the house to turn off water. How can you prevent flooding if the sensor alerts you and you are on a vacation in a far off place or even at work when no one is in the house.

Is there any way to turn off the water remotely.
This is one of the stupidest things I have ever read. Yes, this is only good if you have access to your house. If you are away on vacation you should have someone coming every few days to do stuff like check for water leaks (this is likely a clause in your homeowner's insurance). There is no way to remotely turn off the water to your house (really?) as they are pipes which all have manual shut-off valves. If you are away you need to have someone who has access to your house that you can contact and have them go over.

The idea for something like this is if you say have a laundry/utility room in your basement with hot water tank, washer dryer, etc. you set up one of the sensors so if something breaks you can quickly address it. If the hose pops out of my laundry machine return it makes a huge mess in the basement and you won't notice until there are inches of water down there. One of these sensors will tell me immediately and I can get down there and either turn off the shut-off for the house or the appliance and get it fixed with minimal damage. Small drips and leaks add up over time and if you put these in problem areas you can fix them.

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