Expired Hot Deals

[Best Buy] [HOT] Cuisinart 10-Piece Stainless Steel Cookware Set - Stainless Steel

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  • May 19th, 2020 7:27 pm
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Aug 10, 2006
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[Best Buy] [HOT] Cuisinart 10-Piece Stainless Steel Cookware Set - Stainless Steel

this is a really hot deal, i got a similar set at Costco a year ago for 399$ but I needed it right away. even good for induction which is a plus! the only down side is that it doesn't have a pour-spout. used for 1 year and no scratch on it.

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Cook like a pro with this Cuisinart 10-piece stainless steel cookware set. Whether you are upgrading your dishes or looking for a perfect wedding gift, this set provides everything a person needs to cook their favourite dishes in the comfort of their own home. The set includes 1, 2, and 3 qt. saucepans, 6 qt stockpot, and 9.5" skillet with lids.

Ten-piece cookware set includes 1 qt. saucepan, 2 qt. saucepan, 3 qt. saucepan, 6 qt. stockpot, and 9.5" skillet, all with lids
Professional stainless steel construction provides durability and is safe to use on induction cooktops
Smoothly tapered rims eliminate drips and spills while pouring
Lids are tightfitting to seal in moisture and nutrients
Heat is spread quickly and evenly thanks to the aluminum-encapsulated base
Solid stainless steel riveted stick handles stay cool so you can easily move the pots and pans during the cooking process
Oven safe to 350-degrees Celsius (500-degrees Fahrenheit) to provide versatility for dishes that require both oven and stovetop cooking
Dishwasher-safe for easy clean-up
Safe for all stove tops including induction
Last edited by bestknightmare on May 18th, 2020 2:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
20 replies
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May 16, 2011
4436 posts
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Burnaby, BC
bestknightmare wrote: hey that's actually the one I got...and I swear it was 399$, don't think I can get a price match after..... 11 months?
You might have gotten a different larger set. It's worth a shot, sure.
Newbie
Nov 5, 2019
40 posts
13 upvotes
I'm looking at getting a stainless steel cookset. Haven't seen too many deals on redflag lately, been checking regularly.

Anyone have any recommendations on where to look? Or when to wait for?
Member
Dec 20, 2010
450 posts
155 upvotes
Toronto
If you have a friend that works for Best Buy, it’s nicely discounted on staff pricing.
Gullible? Click here to find out!
Jr. Member
Feb 24, 2007
147 posts
70 upvotes
Thornhill
Surban0 wrote: What does that mean, disc-bottom?
Only the bottom is clad with aluminum instead of the whole pot/pan.
Cladding is where they put a piece of aluminum in between 2 pieces of stainless steel, commonly known as tri-ply.
Sr. Member
Dec 15, 2012
648 posts
367 upvotes
Toronto
How good are these to make scrambled eggs and not sticking? 0.0
Sr. Member
Oct 27, 2014
553 posts
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Toronto, ON
lakesarecool wrote: Only the bottom is clad with aluminum instead of the whole pot/pan.
Cladding is where they put a piece of aluminum in between 2 pieces of stainless steel, commonly known as tri-ply.
Thanks for explaining.
what is the advantage of having the tri-fly throughout?
Jr. Member
Feb 24, 2007
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Thornhill
misterlamed wrote: How good are these to make scrambled eggs and not sticking? 0.0
If you really want non stick when making eggs you're better off with a non stick pan or a well seasoned cast iron or carbon steel skillet.
It's not that you can't make eggs with stainless steel, you absolutely can, it just takes a bit more work and you have to make sure you properly heat and oil the pan.

Stainless cooking depends on the liedenfrost effect for non stick which can be seen in the video below. Anyone cooking in stainless for the first time should watch this video and do a water test before cooking.
Jr. Member
Feb 24, 2007
147 posts
70 upvotes
Thornhill
muppetslayer wrote: Thanks for explaining.
what is the advantage of having the tri-fly throughout?
The idea is because the entire pot/pan has the same cladding it will result in more even cooking. I am not experienced enough of a cook to really tell you how much of a difference it will make.
I can only paraphrase what I've read which is it's great for fry pans/saute pans where you regularly use the side walls as a part of the cooking process and apparently for pots it reduces the amount of burning and overall stirring required.
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Aug 20, 2012
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Pacific Ocean
lakesarecool wrote: If you really want non stick when making eggs you're better off with a non stick pan or a well seasoned cast iron or carbon steel skillet.
It's not that you can't make eggs with stainless steel, you absolutely can, it just takes a bit more work and you have to make sure you properly heat and oil the pan.

Stainless cooking depends on the liedenfrost effect for non stick which can be seen in the video below. Anyone cooking in stainless for the first time should watch this video and do a water test before cooking.
This is the same for cast iron and carbon steel. This is why peeps get stuck food on both cast iron and carbon steel regardless of X times of seasoning. It actually works. I had a hard time getting eggs to not stick on cast iron. Seasoned my new cast iron 5-6 times using high smoke point oil, oven method and food still got stuck. Then read an article on cast iron cooking and the Leidenfrost principle. And it works. I find the Leidenfrost appears around 390-410F as measured by my infrared thermometer over dozens of times. You wait until the temp of the pan causes the Leidenfrost effect. THEN you place the oil onto the pan. The oil will smoke a little. Make sure to use a high smoke point oil like avocado oil, canola, safflower, et al that have s.p. above 450F. Swirl the pan to get the oil all over the surface cooking area. Then place the egg on to fry and it shudnt stick. After 15-20 seconds you lower the heat by 1 notch down to say 350F (medium) because cast iron retains heat on a lagged 3-4 min. Leaving at same temp will increase the cast iron temp causing the oil to burn onto pan and food burn onto the pan as well. Then slowly work around the egg with the spatula. Once all the egg yoke turns white you can easily pry the egg off the skillet and flip to other side. Why?? The Leidenfrost effect prevents liquids from sticking to a hard surface as gases above the surface are heated to a vaporizing temp greater than the vaporizing temp of the liquid. This not only applies to water droplets but to oil as well. Thus oil is essentially gliding on the surface. When egg is placed on top of the heated oil it too is "gliding" atop the cooking surface preventing the egg from sticking. Too low a temp, food sticks. Too high a temp the oil and food burns. Takes a bit to get used to... Otherwise use a non-stick pan. lol.
If the glove don't fit you must acquit! #WINNING
Member
Feb 15, 2018
242 posts
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aznnorth wrote: This is the same for cast iron and carbon steel. This is why peeps get stuck food on both cast iron and carbon steel regardless of X times of seasoning. It actually works. I had a hard time getting eggs to not stick on cast iron. Seasoned my new cast iron 5-6 times using high smoke point oil, oven method and food still got stuck. Then read an article on cast iron cooking and the Leidenfrost principle. And it works. I find the Leidenfrost appears around 390-410F as measured by my infrared thermometer over dozens of times. You wait until the temp of the pan causes the Leidenfrost effect. THEN you place the oil onto the pan. The oil will smoke a little. Make sure to use a high smoke point oil like avocado oil, canola, safflower, et al that have s.p. above 450F. Swirl the pan to get the oil all over the surface cooking area. Then place the egg on to fry and it shudnt stick. After 15-20 seconds you lower the heat by 1 notch down to say 350F (medium) because cast iron retains heat on a lagged 3-4 min. Leaving at same temp will increase the cast iron temp causing the oil to burn onto pan and food burn onto the pan as well. Then slowly work around the egg with the spatula. Once all the egg yoke turns white you can easily pry the egg off the skillet and flip to other side. Why?? The Leidenfrost effect prevents liquids from sticking to a hard surface as gases above the surface are heated to a vaporizing temp greater than the vaporizing temp of the liquid. This not only applies to water droplets but to oil as well. Thus oil is essentially gliding on the surface. When egg is placed on top of the heated oil it too is "gliding" atop the cooking surface preventing the egg from sticking. Too low a temp, food sticks. Too high a temp the oil and food burns. Takes a bit to get used to... Otherwise use a non-stick pan. lol.
Wow. That's a lot of work. Begs the question: why use stainless steel at all?
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Aug 20, 2012
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tcelling wrote: Wow. That's a lot of work. Begs the question: why use stainless steel at all?
Cant stand stainless steel. Cast iron is much more forgiving and much easier to cook with. Worse case, you make a train wreck mess of the seasoning and burn everything - you can always dump it in a lye bath and start seasoning all over again. OR put the oven in self cleaning mode and strip everything bare to the cast iron and start the seasoning process over. All is not lost. Carbon steel is as forgiving as well. With stainless steel ruin a piece it's basically the garbage dump imo.
If the glove don't fit you must acquit! #WINNING

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