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New Eero Pro 6E Routers on Sale $848(3-Pack)/$364.99(1-Pack)

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  • May 2nd, 2022 8:59 pm
Deal Expert
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Mar 6, 2003
17052 posts
9182 upvotes
Ottawa
I don't even have any 6E devices yet. And even if I did, I don't really know if it would make a meaningful difference. I'm not downloading huge files regularly. From what I gather, 6Ghz has even less range than 5Ghz.

It's really not worth paying a premium or early adopter fees. In time, these 6E routers will be as cheap as the 6 ones are now.

And yes, I expect these new Eeros to be buggy. I think when the 6 came out, they also had some teething pains. I'm on the old 5 cupcake and they are solid
Deal Addict
Jan 11, 2002
1862 posts
941 upvotes
Midland
ysl5710 wrote: Don’t bother with eero get something reliable. Had to return my eero as it did not work with some equipment as I wanted abs customer service not reliable.
The customer service is fantastic. I’ve had a few internet issue and they always point the finger at my internet provider. Of course my provider always points the finger at my setup. If it works 99.9% of the time, isn’t my provider to blame? Also the reddit thread is a gold mine of helpful troubleshooting and tips.
Deal Addict
Oct 17, 2002
1219 posts
305 upvotes
Oakville
Not going to comment on EERO vs. other brands, but just a general question on these mesh systems with high prices.... is there any benefit with paying this price if you're doing a wired backhaul?

Or is the benefit of these higher priced units for the better 'wireless' backhaul?
Deal Expert
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Mar 6, 2003
17052 posts
9182 upvotes
Ottawa
KennyX wrote: Not going to comment on EERO vs. other brands, but just a general question on these mesh systems with high prices.... is there any benefit with paying this price if you're doing a wired backhaul?

Or is the benefit of these higher priced units for the better 'wireless' backhaul?
Mesh systems are designed to offer consistent strong signal in a large area to service devices anywhere throughout a location. And having a wired backhaul just means the radios won't have to do that duty anymore. The better Eero Pro units have more capable radios and processing than their cheaper ones (differences https://support.eero.com/hc/en-us/artic ... Comparison)
Newbie
User avatar
Apr 24, 2018
23 posts
4 upvotes
Toronto
warpdrive wrote: Mesh systems are designed to offer consistent strong signal in a large area to service devices anywhere throughout a location. And having a wired backhaul just means the radios won't have to do that duty anymore. The better Eero Pro units have more capable radios and processing than their cheaper ones (differences https://support.eero.com/hc/en-us/artic ... Comparison)
So the answer is yes?
Deal Addict
Nov 25, 2002
2508 posts
1143 upvotes
KennyX wrote: Not going to comment on EERO vs. other brands, but just a general question on these mesh systems with high prices.... is there any benefit with paying this price if you're doing a wired backhaul?

Or is the benefit of these higher priced units for the better 'wireless' backhaul?
The benefit depends on how much time are you willing or able to spend to "optimize" a home grown multiple AP network even if you do wired backhaul.

Capability wise, mesh isn't going to be orders of magnitude better than a cheaper single router. The real benefit to mech comes from saved effort to troubleshoot and remove deadzones, balance transmission strengths, optimize channels, configure each AP, interact with the UI, expand in the future, setup security features, yadda yadda yadda.

eero is probably one of the most well known "premium" mesh systems and amazon is pricing it cause they know it. I run them at home and they've been completely rock solid for the 2+ years since I started WFH. I went from the basic eero 5 "cupcake" version, to the eero 5 pros, and to the eero 6 pros (only because I got a good deal on each upgrade. if not, I would still be running the eero 5 cupcakes to this day happily). Eero's "true mesh" system allows for mixed setups (no need to replace everything just to add newer hardware) and the dynamic wireless backhauling makes it more reliable to interference. They have Homekit secure router support up to eero 6's but newer 6E hardware isn't going to get it (blame amazon). Eero's truemesh is also continuously self-optimizing and monitors over several timescales. I saw faster speeds weeks after my initial speed tests after I initially deployed them from the same device in the same location (350-400mbps -> 500mbps). Upgrading from the cupcakes to the pros to the 6 pros was also super easy. literally a few taps on the app and plug and play.

i used to run 2 APs with custom flashed FWs with onboard VPN, custom routing rules, etc.. It was fun for a while but it didn't scale with my IoT devices, didn't hand off properly, had deadspots still even with tx strength on max (though that was a mistake I learned later). Ever since Eero, it's been smooooth sailing. haven't had to touch the system. Took me a while to break old habits of opening the app every checking things and realizing there's nothing really to configure. One thing I learnt along the way is that Wifi is a HUGE YMMV and highly dynamic due to neighbours and other devices, microwaves, different building materials, etc.... just cause I get 500mbps doesn't mean you'll get it in your home. But the fact that it's highly dynamic is what makes eero shine. Oh, they also control their entire network stack and not just building a UI on top of OEM hardware.

It still sucks the security addons is a subscription (i just run pihole) and amazon is slowly working it's fingers into their product road map (no more Homekit Secure Router, dumb ring integrations, linking to amazon accounts). Also the pricing on this hardware is bonkers. obviously not worth it now. wait a few years for 6E to come down.

Oh, on the topic of customer support, they're very active on the eero subreddit. Lots of informative no-BS posts from their engineers and employees. one of the main reasons I decided to go eero in fact. You're not going to get that with TP-Link.
Last edited by mr_yellow on May 2nd, 2022 12:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Newbie
User avatar
Oct 9, 2017
76 posts
47 upvotes
If you don't have 6E capable device, then I'd advise getting the 6 pro. It's also on sale albeit not at atl.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Mar 6, 2003
17052 posts
9182 upvotes
Ottawa
Amazon should offer some kind of trade up program like they have in the US. I wouldn't mind upgrading to a couple of 6 Pros or 6E Pros to replace 3 cupcake Eeros.
Jr. Member
May 25, 2021
132 posts
403 upvotes
Repo600 wrote: Can someone with more knowledge explain why these retail for a grand?
Because there are dumb people even here believing that "you get what you pay for".
Jr. Member
Nov 13, 2017
138 posts
179 upvotes
Ontario
mikeyyz wrote: This is not true. These eero pro 6E have a 2.5G port on each node.
So if you're using wired backhaul, then the 2.5gbps port is taken up by that and end devices are limited to a gigabit port. But if you're using wireless backhaul, what's the max speed one can get if they have a 2.5gbps connection going into the main unit, and a 2.5gbps end device plugged into another node via ethernet?
Deal Addict
Nov 25, 2002
2508 posts
1143 upvotes
DonJoe wrote: So if you're using wired backhaul, then the 2.5gbps port is taken up by that and end devices are limited to a gigabit port. But if you're using wireless backhaul, what's the max speed one can get if they have a 2.5gbps connection going into the main unit, and a 2.5gbps end device plugged into another node via ethernet?
The mixed 2.5 and 1gbit port is rather strange. But to answer your question, the bottle neck would Be the throughput of whatever radio is doing the backhaul. It could be 6Ghz, 5 or 2.4. It all depends on the interference at any given time.

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