Food & Drink

Best place/Best Price to buy Goat / Lamb?

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  • Sep 3rd, 2021 8:24 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Jul 26, 2021
2 posts
6 upvotes

Best place/Best Price to buy Goat / Lamb?

Hello All,


I am planning to make goat curry ( boneless), can someone suggest a good decent place to buy goat(boneless). Also what is the usual cost of goat with bone and boneless.
Also, what is the difference between goat and lamb.

in past I have bought goat once from Fresh Value in Etobicoke.

Please drop in suggestions with estimates of prices to get an idea.
Last edited by dealsfish on Aug 29th, 2021 6:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
25 replies
Newbie
User avatar
Dec 1, 2009
83 posts
38 upvotes
Toronto
If you don't have it already, download the flipp app. You can do a search to find sales on goat and lamb. Over the years I find the Chinese grocery stores usually have it cheap. If you're looking for Halal, a lot of those stores have a section for that. In my experience bone in curry is a lot more flavourful.

As for lamb vs. goat, can't tell you much, google might tell you more. I've heard that people don't like that lamb is a little more gamey tasting. Goat you need to cook down a lot more to make it tender. Sorry I couldn't be more help!
If you're happy, and they're unhappy....it was a good deal.
[OP]
Newbie
Jul 26, 2021
2 posts
6 upvotes
Thank you.. That was helpful, given that people don't like my post and are giving me thumbs down.
This is my first reply to the post.

Thanks
Newbie
User avatar
Dec 1, 2009
83 posts
38 upvotes
Toronto
Np! I saw 'curry', so I thought I can offer some kinda advice.

You can post back and let us know what you found, and pics of the finished product!
If you're happy, and they're unhappy....it was a good deal.
Deal Guru
Nov 15, 2008
12217 posts
7298 upvotes
Typically you can only get goat as bone-in cubes & you are going to pay though the nose for bonless because it is uncommon. The best deal is the 1 kg bags at Freshco or Food Basics for $20 because at Loblaws it will cost you $30. I find goat gamier than mutton which is gamier than lamb. Lamb is the fattiest & since fat carries the flavour, some may say that it is gamier though the flavour of the fat is more gentle, I think. Goat is much leaner. For lamb the best stewing deals is the the NZ lamb shoulder for $3.99/lb specials at Metro. Again, it is bone-in but to cube it for stew you would have to take the bones out first. Another option is NZ ground lamb that goes on sale at Food Basics for $4.99/lb, regular $7.99. I use it in dals in place of lamb cubes & it is really quick to use & suits a soup better.
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
22855 posts
21706 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
When I saw your thread title …
My first thought was …
It depends WHERE you live in this great country

And when I read your post … it became rather apparent you live in the GTA
So you have lots of options vs many of us (lucky for you )

Still though … as a Newbie here
I think you should update your RFD Profile so it shows a LOCATION
Under your User Name
(Like mine says Eastern Ontario)

You’ll find it quite useful when using the Forums
So folks know where you are coming from when you ask questions
Or post your POV on a topic

Cuz RFD is one great website … with members who participate Canada wide
From NFLD to BC, and Point Pelee to Iqualuit
Smiling Face With Sunglasses
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Nov 15, 2020
5316 posts
4005 upvotes
dealsfish wrote: Thank you.. That was helpful, given that people don't like my post and are giving me thumbs down.
This is my first reply to the post.

Thanks
aww dont be like that. It's not the post they didnt like.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 20, 2009
7725 posts
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Toronto
dealsfish wrote: Thank you.. That was helpful, given that people don't like my post and are giving me thumbs down.
This is my first reply to the post.

Thanks
You were being thumbed down because you initially posted this in "Hot Deals", which is a thread where people post Hot Deals.
For all other things (questions, observations, etc), just find the appropriate sub forum and post.
"When someone is burning a book, they are showing utter contempt for all of the thinking that produced its ideas, all of the labor that went into its words and sentences, and all of the trouble that befell the author . . .” ― Lemony Snicket
Jr. Member
Oct 17, 2013
179 posts
125 upvotes
Ontario
I raise goats, so I'll try to explain the differences between lamb and goat. Lamb is meat from a sheep under a year old, whereas mutton comes from sheep over a year of age. The older the sheep, the more intense flavour and "toughness" of the meat, much will depend on the method of cooking. I find lamb more gamey than goat.

Unfortunately, people very rarely differentiate goat meat between young vs old. Young kid (under a year of age), is tender and to me tastes like a cross between beef and lamb. I actually prefer it to lamb. When you start taking animals that are older and not castrated, especially over 2 years, you will get bucks where the meat can be pungent! The muskiness and hormones the bucks use during breeding is extremely aromatic and will pass through to the meat. This applies to many animal species when males are not castrated, the meat become very strong and can be tough. If this is the only experience people have had with goat meat, chances are they will be left with a negative memory.
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
22855 posts
21706 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
earthygoat wrote: I raise goats, so I'll try to explain the differences between lamb and goat. Lamb is meat from a sheep under a year old, whereas mutton comes from sheep over a year of age. The older the sheep, the more intense flavour and "toughness" of the meat, much will depend on the method of cooking. I find lamb more gamey than goat.

Unfortunately, people very rarely differentiate goat meat between young vs old. Young kid (under a year of age), is tender and to me tastes like a cross between beef and lamb. I actually prefer it to lamb. When you start taking animals that are older and not castrated, especially over 2 years, you will get bucks where the meat can be pungent! The muskiness and hormones the bucks use during breeding is extremely aromatic and will pass through to the meat. This applies to many animal species when males are not castrated, the meat become very strong and can be tough. If this is the only experience people have had with goat meat, chances are they will be left with a negative memory.
This

Good explanation

Indeed Sheep and Goats are 2 different species.

And so the meats from them similar but different … kind of like Cows & Bison, or Ducks & Geese
Chicken & Turkey, or Crab & Lobster etc

So depending on what you are cooking / going for … they may or may not be interchangeable
Deal Addict
Oct 23, 2017
2639 posts
2193 upvotes
GTA West
dealsfish wrote: Hello All,


I am planning to make goat curry ( boneless), can someone suggest a good decent place to buy goat(boneless). Also what is the usual cost of goat with bone and boneless.
Also, what is the difference between goat and lamb.

in past I have bought goat once from Fresh Value in Etobicoke.

Please drop in suggestions with estimates of prices to get an idea.


Other posters have explained the difference between lamb and goat, and lamb vs mutton. But in India they use the term "mutton" for goat meat, so that can be confusing! They have lots of goats which is the source of their red meat.

You get goat meat in markets that cater to ethnic groups that love goat, e.g. Caribbean and South Asian.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 7, 2017
8389 posts
4080 upvotes
SW corner of the cou…
RCS has goat meat in the frozen section, even in my relatively white-bread part of B.C.
Dealmaker1945 wrote: Other posters have explained the difference between lamb and goat, and lamb vs mutton. But in India they use the term "mutton" for goat meat, so that can be confusing! They have lots of goats which is the source of their red meat.
Seems to have spread anywhere there's an Indian population. SE Asia (Malaysia, Singapore) for another 2. One of my favorite dishes is sop kambing which doesn't seem to have the flavour if made with sheep.
I smile when I see container ships sailing past my house laden with stuff made in China
Deal Expert
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Jan 27, 2004
50006 posts
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ONTARIO
Oh i learned a lot today.
I love that pungent lamb/goat taste.
Although it does have to accompany strong spices and flavour.
My top 3 lamb/goat dishes

#3 west indies style curry goat. I miss how TJ’s used to have boneless goat roti :(

#2 east indian Rogan josh

#1 Chinese Uyghur/xinjiang lamb skewers. Has to be grilled over coals for that smokey taste. Always great with its dusting of cumin, chili & fennel. Perfect skewer to wash down with some ice cold beers.

honorable mention... Chinese goat stew. I only put it here because I only eat it in the winter time. A bit of old skool thinking... But I feel I get too hot and sweaty if I eat lamb stew in the spring/summer. lol.
Its usually just goat cubes stewed with 5 spices blend (in a cheese cloth bag), fermented tofu, tofu skin, baby bamboo shoots.
Last edited by UrbanPoet on Sep 2nd, 2021 11:41 am, edited 3 times in total.
Newbie
User avatar
Dec 1, 2009
83 posts
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Toronto
earthygoat wrote: I raise goats, so I'll try to explain the differences between lamb and goat. Lamb is meat from a sheep under a year old, whereas mutton comes from sheep over a year of age. The older the sheep, the more intense flavour and "toughness" of the meat, much will depend on the method of cooking. I find lamb more gamey than goat.

Unfortunately, people very rarely differentiate goat meat between young vs old. Young kid (under a year of age), is tender and to me tastes like a cross between beef and lamb. I actually prefer it to lamb. When you start taking animals that are older and not castrated, especially over 2 years, you will get bucks where the meat can be pungent! The muskiness and hormones the bucks use during breeding is extremely aromatic and will pass through to the meat. This applies to many animal species when males are not castrated, the meat become very strong and can be tough. If this is the only experience people have had with goat meat, chances are they will be left with a negative memory.
Wow! Great info. Thanks, I've also learned a lot. If I go to the butcher, how would I ask for 'young goat'. I'm intrigued by your 'a cross between beef and lamb' comment. I love lamb, and the flavour that comes from the lamb fat, but I'd love to try young goat.
If you're happy, and they're unhappy....it was a good deal.
Deal Expert
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Jan 27, 2004
50006 posts
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ONTARIO
earthygoat wrote:
earthygoat

I raise goats, so I'll try to explain the differences between lamb and goat. Lamb is meat from a sheep under a year old, whereas mutton comes from sheep over a year of age. The older the sheep, the more intense flavour and "toughness" of the meat, much will depend on the method of cooking. I find lamb more gamey than goat.

Unfortunately, people very rarely differentiate goat meat between young vs old. Young kid (under a year of age), is tender and to me tastes like a cross between beef and lamb. I actually prefer it to lamb. When you start taking animals that are older and not castrated, especially over 2 years, you will get bucks where the meat can be pungent! The muskiness and hormones the bucks use during breeding is extremely aromatic and will pass through to the meat. This applies to many animal species when males are not castrated, the meat become very strong and can be tough. If this is the only experience people have had with goat meat, chances are they will be left with a negative memory.
Name checks out
Jr. Member
Oct 17, 2013
179 posts
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Ontario
safxyz wrote: Wow! Great info. Thanks, I've also learned a lot. If I go to the butcher, how would I ask for 'young goat'. I'm intrigued by your 'a cross between beef and lamb' comment. I love lamb, and the flavour that comes from the lamb fat, but I'd love to try young goat.
Because there are so many names used to describe goat meat (chevon, kid, cabrito, etc), and different cultures prefer different ages and flavour intensities, when buying goat meat, I would ask according to the flavour profile you are looking for. Forget about asking based on a name. Around Easter, you will more likely find very young, milk fed kids, probably under 4 months old, and it will be tender and mild. Between 4 months and a year old, you will get the young goat kid that is still probably nursing milk a bit and out on pasture as well, and the flavour is the lamb/beef cross I mentioned. A good butcher should be able to get you what you describe, just make sure to tell them you are not interested in an old, stinky buck if that's not what you want. Not my thing, but some cultures prefer that very intense meat that you can get from only an old buck.
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Jan 27, 2004
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earthygoat wrote: Because there are so many names used to describe goat meat (chevon, kid, cabrito, etc), and different cultures prefer different ages and flavour intensities, when buying goat meat, I would ask according to the flavour profile you are looking for. Forget about asking based on a name. Around Easter, you will more likely find very young, milk fed kids, probably under 4 months old, and it will be tender and mild. Between 4 months and a year old, you will get the young goat kid that is still probably nursing milk a bit and out on pasture as well, and the flavour is the lamb/beef cross I mentioned. A good butcher should be able to get you what you describe, just make sure to tell them you are not interested in an old, stinky buck if that's not what you want. Not my thing, but some cultures prefer that very intense meat that you can get from only an old buck.
Where i buy my goat cubes (Chinese supermarket), they don’t really describe where its from. I assume old now because its strong.

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