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bi-wiring on a Denon surround receiver

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bi-wiring on a Denon surround receiver

Hi,

I just received a Denon avr-x3600h. As of now, I only have my old JMlabs (Focal) Chorus 715 speakers. I like to bi-wiring them. Can someone help me for what connectors I should use on the receiver.

thanks
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Pourquoi pas?
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Ok that was my hypothesis (my previous receiver was a stereo Yamaha so I'm a bit lost). Am I right to suppose this setup
(speaker to receiver):
Mid-high to Front
Bass to Height2
There's picture of the rear of a speaker on my OP.

thanks
Last edited by SPARTACVS on Apr 14th, 2020 3:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Bi-wiring is different than bi-amping. Bi-amping was shown in the link to the user manual. You can definitely bi-wire your speakers using this receiver.
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Bi-wiring is simply running two speaker cables for each red and black terminals on the amp to the red and black terminals of the speaker. The two red and two black speaker cables should not be going to different channels on the speaker. Both all four cables should go to the reds and blacks on the Left and Right channels on the amp. The signals get separated internally in the speaker to high and low.

Here's a pretty good explanation of bi-wiring:


Edit: I have bi-wiring capable speakers and here's how the speaker and amp connections look:
.
20200414_142834.jpg
20200414_144420.jpg
Last edited by DiceMan on Apr 14th, 2020 2:50 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Broli's Mom wrote: You can definitely bi-wire your speakers using this receiver.
Cool thanks for the information. But the question is how to connect the wires on the Denon receiver?
I just want to make clear that I'm really talking of bi-wiring.
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DiceMan wrote:
Edit: I have bi-wiring capable speakers and here's how the speaker and amp connections look:
.
Yeah my speakers were bi-wired on my previous receiver. But like I said in a post above, I went from a Yamaha stereo receiver to a Denon home theater receiver so things are a completely different: see picture
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SPARTACVS wrote: Yeah my speakers were bi-wired on my previous receiver. But like I said in a post above, I went from a Yamaha stereo receiver to a Denon home theater receiver so things are a completely different: see picture
I may be seriously misunderstanding your question, but I don't think so. Trust me on this. Your Yamaha stereo receiver and your Denon HT receiver are no different except for the fact that your Denon is capable of driving more than two speakers. EACH of those Denon speaker labels (Front R, Front L, Center, Surround R, Surround L, Surround Back R, Surround Back L, Height 1 R, Height 1 L, Height 2 R, Height 2 L) are meant to be connected to one, unique speaker only. You can not wire terminals for two or more of these to the same speaker - DO NOT wire your Denon Fronts to the bass terminals of your speakers and the Heights to the mid/high terminals of the same speakers.

You need to wire BOTH reds and blacks of your right JMlabs (Focal) Chorus 715 speaker to the single red and black Front R of your Denon and BOTH reds and blacks of your left JMlabs (Focal) Chorus 715 speaker to the single red and black Front L of your Denon. This way, you've just set up your Denon in exactly the same way as your Yamaha stereo - with the JMlabs as your Main R & L.

Get separate speakers for the other connections as you see fit.
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DiceMan wrote: I may be seriously misunderstanding your question, but I don't think so. Trust me on this. Your Yamaha stereo receiver and your Denon HT receiver are no different except for the fact that your Denon is capable of driving more than two speakers. EACH of those Denon speaker labels (Front R, Front L, Center, Surround R, Surround L, Surround Back R, Surround Back L, Height 1 R, Height 1 L, Height 2 R, Height 2 L) are meant to be connected to one, unique speaker only. You can not wire terminals for two or more of these to the same speaker - DO NOT wire your Denon Fronts to the bass terminals of your speakers and the Heights to the mid/high terminals of the same speakers.

You need to wire BOTH reds and blacks of your right JMlabs (Focal) Chorus 715 speaker to the single red and black Front R of your Denon and BOTH reds and blacks of your left JMlabs (Focal) Chorus 715 speaker to the single red and black Front L of your Denon. This way, you've just set up your Denon in exactly the same way as your Yamaha stereo - with the JMlabs as your Main R & L.
Ok I got it. Just like your bottom left picture. Didn't get it at first because, on my Yamaha, it was different. Had L+R on speakers A +B. So all four connectors were used on the receiver. The bad news is I will need to buy some kind of connectors like the male gold ones you have for the second wire. Is it important which one (bass or mid-high) goes in the connector?

I really don't undersant why it's not explained in the user manual. Anyway...

thanks
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i just bought a set of energy rc-70s and it has 4 post just like yours but it came with 2 metal plates that spice the reds and blacks to each other what would be the point of running 2 sets of wires to it if there both coming off the same connector in the receiver.
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aaron158 wrote: i just bought a set of energy rc-70s and it has 4 post just like yours but it came with 2 metal plates that spice the reds and blacks to each other what would be the point of running 2 sets of wires to it if there both coming off the same connector in the receiver.
The purpose of the metal plate is to short the two reds and two blacks so the speaker can be connected with one speaker cable to red and one to black for a conventional setup. Usually, in this case the wires should be connected to the lower pair of terminals but it's not a big deal.

If you decide on going bi-wire, remove the metal clip.
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DiceMan wrote: The purpose of the metal plate is to short the two reds and two blacks so the speaker can be connected with one speaker cable to red and one to black for a conventional setup. Usually, in this case the wires should be connected to the lower pair of terminals but it's not a big deal.

If you decide on going bi-wire, remove the metal clip.
but what does bi wiring do for u if u are connecting both sets of wires to the L and R terminal on the receiver wouldn't that be doing the same thing the metal pate does just making it require alot more wires.
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aaron158 wrote: but what does bi wiring do for u if u are connecting both sets of wires to the L and R terminal on the receiver wouldn't that be doing the same thing the metal pate does just making it require alot more wires.
There's internal speaker circuitry/wiring apart from the crossover that sends that one signal to which speaker drivers its supposed to go to. In a way, it's almost like bypassing the crossover. And in theory, if you have speaker cables that excel in the highs, you would connect them to the upper speaker terminals. If you have another set of cables (perhaps a different brand) that do well with bass, then you'd use that on the lower terminals.

Watch the video I posted. It does a much better job of explaining than I can.
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DiceMan wrote: There's internal speaker circuitry/wiring apart from the crossover that sends that one signal to which speaker drivers its supposed to go to. In a way, it's almost like bypassing the crossover. And in theory, if you have speaker cables that excel in the highs, you would connect them to the upper speaker terminals. If you have another set of cables (perhaps a different brand) that do well with bass, then you'd use that on the lower terminals.

Watch the video I posted. It does a much better job of explaining than I can.
ok ya that makes more since. in his second example of using 2 dif amps to get dif types of sound makes there sound like there's kinda of a point to but in his first example of just using 2 dif types wires to the same amp that sounds like some monster cable type snake oil i need to buy a special cable tuned just for a tweeter and woofer to get the best sound out of my speakers lol.

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