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Winter tires - Michelin X-Ice Snow & Conti Viking Contact 7, best prices +10% off

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Feb 19, 2014
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Langley
warpdrive wrote: You can use tirerack's vehicle search to find out the common potential replacement sizes.

https://www.tirerack.com/tires/SelectTi ... toModClar=

entire your car here and select optional sizes.


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Hmm. Weird. So I entered my 2021 Toyota Rav 4 Hybrid XSE. Standard tire size is 18", it gives me an option to put on 16", but when I called toyota they said the smallest I could go was 17".

I would prefer the smaller tire, but I'm going with the 17" just to be safe since that's what my Toyota dealer recommends.
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Mar 6, 2003
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jellytime wrote: Hmm. Weird. So I entered my 2021 Toyota Rav 4 Hybrid XSE. Standard tire size is 18", it gives me an option to put on 16", but when I called toyota they said the smallest I could go was 17".

I would prefer the smaller tire, but I'm going with the 17" just to be safe since that's what my Toyota dealer recommends.
Dealers will be more cautious in recommending sizes as they will probably stick to sizes that are factory specified (I believe the base RAV4 comes in a 17 inch). So choosing 17 is a safe choice to play it safe.

I'd expect that TIreRack is right that a 16" would fit too.....but unless you have a specific reason to want that size, then don't try to change too much
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Sr. Member
Jun 12, 2018
576 posts
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Ontario
Anyone know if Continental has a winter tire rebate coming up?
Newbie
Dec 20, 2020
30 posts
4 upvotes
Is there any benefit for purchasing tires with a credit card that has a decent insurance. Also, do i keep that card for several years until i am using tires?

I am asking this as i do not know whether credit cards insurance provides any benefit for tires.

Thank you!
Newbie
Nov 24, 2016
10 posts
3 upvotes
kronos288 wrote: Do the cross climate 2s qualify to insurance companies as running winter tires?
I just quoted insurance from a few companies and they all accepted the cross climate 2s. As long as it has the three mountain peak snowflake certification they were ok with it.
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Jan 19, 2007
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lukezamboni wrote: I just quoted insurance from a few companies and they all accepted the cross climate 2s. As long as it has the three mountain peak snowflake certification they were ok with it.
Really? Aw! Haha I would have gone that. Oh well too late.
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Dec 27, 2012
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Canada
jellytime wrote: Hmm. Weird. So I entered my 2021 Toyota Rav 4 Hybrid XSE. Standard tire size is 18", it gives me an option to put on 16", but when I called toyota they said the smallest I could go was 17".

I would prefer the smaller tire, but I'm going with the 17" just to be safe since that's what my Toyota dealer recommends.
warpdrive wrote: Dealers will be more cautious in recommending sizes as they will probably stick to sizes that are factory specified (I believe the base RAV4 comes in a 17 inch). So choosing 17 is a safe choice to play it safe.

I'd expect that TIreRack is right that a 16" would fit too.....but unless you have a specific reason to want that size, then don't try to change too much
There is absolutely zero concern going with a 16” wheel, the wheel size is irrelevant. You want to concern yourself with overall rolling diameter of the wheel/tire combo itself. Use this to compare overall sizes. https://tiresize.com/comparison/ If you stray from the overall diameter that is where change can take affect, ie speedometer, fuel economy, and sometimes AWD function. If the overall rolling diameter of what you choose to go with is the same as OEM then you’ll notice little to no difference. If anything your overall ride may be more comfortable feeling with a more meaty tire versus the lower profile 18”.

Dealerships are not gospel, they do not always recommend what the factory suggests, but rather what will make them money. Remember a dealership makes nearly all of its profit in the service department and in the business office, not on the car itself. It’s ridiculous what my Toyota dealer was trying to “recommend”, everything was extra servicing, none of which was found on Toyota’s website or in the service manual. If you really want what Toyota recommends go to the source, Toyota itself. Dealers are in it to make money and they make agreements with tire suppliers. Of course they will recommend what they get the best deal on.
Jr. Member
Apr 24, 2012
137 posts
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Orillia
jbone14 wrote: There is absolutely zero concern going with a 16” wheel, the wheel size is irrelevant. You want to concern yourself with overall rolling diameter of the wheel/tire combo itself. Use this to compare overall sizes. https://tiresize.com/comparison/ If you stray from the overall diameter that is where change can take affect, ie speedometer, fuel economy, and sometimes AWD function. If the overall rolling diameter of what you choose to go with is the same as OEM then you’ll notice little to no difference. If anything your overall ride may be more comfortable feeling with a more meaty tire versus the lower profile 18”.

Dealerships are not gospel, they do not always recommend what the factory suggests, but rather what will make them money. Remember a dealership makes nearly all of its profit in the service department and in the business office, not on the car itself. It’s ridiculous what my Toyota dealer was trying to “recommend”, everything was extra servicing, none of which was found on Toyota’s website or in the service manual. If you really want what Toyota recommends go to the source, Toyota itself. Dealers are in it to make money and they make agreements with tire suppliers. Of course they will recommend what they get the best deal on.
And what happens when the wheel is too small and doesn't fit over the caliper? Is that irrelevant?

Always best to stick with sizes offered from factory, especially if it's under warranty.
Sr. Member
Jun 12, 2018
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Ontario
vpasla1 wrote: And what happens when the wheel is too small and doesn't fit over the caliper? Is that irrelevant?

Always best to stick with sizes offered from factory, especially if it's under warranty.
And what if it does fit over the caliper? Then there's no concern
Jr. Member
Apr 24, 2012
137 posts
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Orillia
stevo88 wrote: And what if it does fit over the caliper? Then there's no concern
My point was when the poster said wheel size is irrelevant and that diameter is the only thing worth looking at. Wheel size is absolutely relevant.

However, are you going to go with jellytime to their dealer to argue an issue if their dealer states an issue that a non factory recommended size tire caused issues with their axles, suspension or driveline and it's not covered under warranty?

Sometimes it's easier to pay an extra $200 over the life of a set of winter tires that'll last 5 years, than to deal with a stubborn dealer while under warranty.
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Mar 6, 2003
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Ottawa
It's not rocket science, either the smaller wheel fits or it doesn't. The wheel has to clear the calipers, and the offset should be the right amount that it doesn't cause the wheel to be non-centered and change the wheel tracking too much.

Dealers will only offer the sizes they know will fit but I doubt they test the combinations where you go extra small or extra large. In this case, the 16 will likely fit fine, but unless you have a wheel that you can test fit yourself, you won't know until you spent the money.

For example, on my car, the car comes with a stock 18 inch wheel. The calipers aren't that large but looking at them, you'd think that 17 would fit. However, they don't....there is one part of the caliper that sticks out just enough and 90% of 17" wheels do NOT clear the brakes.

If your car's manual has the recommended sizes of tires and wheels, going with the smallest size specified in the manual is going to be the best bet.....don't mess with trying to calculate rolling diameter yourself.
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Mar 6, 2003
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vpasla1 wrote: My point was when the poster said wheel size is irrelevant and that diameter is the only thing worth looking at. Wheel size is absolutely relevant.

However, are you going to go with jellytime to their dealer to argue an issue if their dealer states an issue that a non factory recommended size tire caused issues with their axles, suspension or driveline and it's not covered under warranty?

Sometimes it's easier to pay an extra $200 over the life of a set of winter tires that'll last 5 years, than to deal with a stubborn dealer while under warranty.
Yup....I had an issue with my tire pressure light coming on constantly. And they saw my nonstandard wheels and didn't even bother looking at it at all because they claimed that I was using a nonstandard tire size (I wasn't....it was exactly stock size. Stupid stupid dealer).

But the point is: if you don't stick with the standard sizes, they definitely will use excuses against you if they can get away with it.
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Dec 27, 2012
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Canada
vpasla1 wrote: My point was when the poster said wheel size is irrelevant and that diameter is the only thing worth looking at. Wheel size is absolutely relevant.

However, are you going to go with jellytime to their dealer to argue an issue if their dealer states an issue that a non factory recommended size tire caused issues with their axles, suspension or driveline and it's not covered under warranty?

Sometimes it's easier to pay an extra $200 over the life of a set of winter tires that'll last 5 years, than to deal with a stubborn dealer while under warranty.
stevo88 wrote: And what if it does fit over the caliper? Then there's no concern
Yes, you obviously buy wheels that are spec'd for your vehicle. Offset and width. That should be a no brainer but obviously I shouldve added that as well. If you do that, you clear the calipers which is generally not difficult to begin with as you'd have to stray pretty far. No dealership is going to blame a failed powertrain on an overall OE spec wheel/tire combination. There are laws in place allowing you to buy what you want and not have to have the dealerships monopolize and control what goes onto and into your vehicle. 16" with same rolling diameter is absolutely fine but its your vehicle and your decision. You can read about it more online rather than hearing from us nutbars.
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Feb 19, 2014
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jbone14 wrote: There is absolutely zero concern going with a 16” wheel, the wheel size is irrelevant. You want to concern yourself with overall rolling diameter of the wheel/tire combo itself. Use this to compare overall sizes. https://tiresize.com/comparison/ If you stray from the overall diameter that is where change can take affect, ie speedometer, fuel economy, and sometimes AWD function. If the overall rolling diameter of what you choose to go with is the same as OEM then you’ll notice little to no difference. If anything your overall ride may be more comfortable feeling with a more meaty tire versus the lower profile 18”.

Dealerships are not gospel, they do not always recommend what the factory suggests, but rather what will make them money. Remember a dealership makes nearly all of its profit in the service department and in the business office, not on the car itself. It’s ridiculous what my Toyota dealer was trying to “recommend”, everything was extra servicing, none of which was found on Toyota’s website or in the service manual. If you really want what Toyota recommends go to the source, Toyota itself. Dealers are in it to make money and they make agreements with tire suppliers. Of course they will recommend what they get the best deal on.
We've never had a new car before, but we just bought an XSE Hybrid RAV 4. Can you elect not to do certain service items?
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Dec 27, 2012
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jellytime wrote: We've never had a new car before, but we just bought an XSE Hybrid RAV 4. Can you elect not to do certain service items?
Your vehicle comes with an operating manual directly from Toyota typically inside your glovebox at delivery. Inside the manual there will be a maintenance guide of recommended servicing and intervals. The dealership will offer what they call "recommended servicing" (dealership recommended) which is above and beyond the recommended servicing from the factory. Its all value added from the dealership. Things like "brake servicing" where they lubricate the brake caliper pistons for $69.99 (that's a popular one at my local Toyota). Nowhere does Toyota recommend this in the service guide. Like I said, the service department and business office (extended warranties etc) is where a dealership makes the majority of its profits (not revenue as we all know cars are big ticket items). My father was in the car industry at a corporate level for nearly 30 years, I have heard it all. Just stick to what the factory themselves recommend, they are the ones that engineered and built the vehicle you're driving, not the local service advisor. That being said, if you feel comfortable accepting the dealerships added servicing or money is not of a concern then go for it!

I should add, my local dealership tried some pretty bothersome pressure tactics by adding comments to my service work orders like "refused service" for the value added items such as the brake service. It's really quite bad these days as those tactics force people to spend unnecessarily for service items that really are not required or have any true benefit. Toyota Canada will only care, that is if you ever get into the position, whether or not your vehicle was serviced based on their recommendations (ie oil change at interval, fluids etc). Not what your local dealership sold you on.
Newbie
Jan 27, 2019
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Got my tires a few weeks ago Toyo OBSERVE GSI-5 for my Honda Civic. Wasn't too thrilled about the DOT code, the tires ranged from the March-April of 2019. If my car was newer I would probably request a newer tire. However I don't expect to drive my car longer than 2-3 yrs, so I figure I shouldn't worry about it.

Overall the tires came quickly but I never received an email to confirm they were shipped. FEDEX did just stacked the tires on my front porch and didn't even ring the doorbell. Luckily nobody took the tires before I got to them. Not sure if i would order tires from there again, based on this experience. But i guess if they are cheap enough I would.
Member
Oct 20, 2012
395 posts
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kronos288 wrote: Really? Aw! Haha I would have gone that. Oh well too late.
You should call and ask yourself. Mime said explicitly all season tires do not qualified regardless 3 peak mountain symbol. They want winter tires. YMMV

If you told them straight you have winter tires, they will give you discount and won’t ask you what tires you have. But not all consider them as winter tires even though they are approved for winter driving. Michelin has never said they are. So be careful.
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Jan 26, 2003
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verybo wrote: You should call and ask yourself. Mime said explicitly all season tires do not qualified regardless 3 peak mountain symbol. They want winter tires. YMMV

If you told them straight you have winter tires, they will give you discount and won’t ask you what tires you have. But not all consider them as winter tires even though they are approved for winter driving. Michelin has never said they are. So be careful.
That's kinda bs.

the CCs are winter rated, hence they have the 3 peak snowflake designation.

But insurance companies have the gold ... and he who has the gold makes the rules ...
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Jun 9, 2011
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vpasla1 wrote: And what happens when the wheel is too small and doesn't fit over the caliper? Is that irrelevant?

Always best to stick with sizes offered from factory, especially if it's under warranty.
Lol, these service advisors are jokers, in my Venza v6, I'm rocking 17" steelies+ winter tires, my oem size was 20". Over 5 years now

Even my ford, I put on 17", oem size is 19".

I save tones of money from down sizing, and my drive is much more cushioned.

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