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Boxwood - is there any saving it?

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  • Apr 16th, 2021 9:40 am
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[OP]
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Feb 26, 2016
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Vaughan

Boxwood - is there any saving it?

I used burlap to cover my boxwood (green velvet) the first two years. Last season, i never covered it and only some of the tips turned yellow. I figured it was mature enough so I got lazy this season again but some of the shrubs turned completely yellow after this winter. Any saving it? I just put down some fertilizer and watered it. Before the winter, i put down fertilizer spikes as well. Is the best alternative to cut the dead parts out and hope the new ones grow? or can i just leave it yellow and hope that watering and fertilizer will bring it back to life? haha.

selling the house this summer or early fall so don't want to remove it or replace it.
Last edited by otaknap on Jul 2nd, 2021 8:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
13 replies
Newbie
Nov 24, 2019
97 posts
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We had about 6 or 7 giant boxwoods in our yard, we took all but 2 out (the front yard ones) as we are redoing our backyard and didnt want them but I had never done anything for them other than trim during regular season. Never any issues. They would turn yellow like that and then come back to normal given time.
Member
Dec 17, 2009
218 posts
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otaknap wrote: I used burlap to cover my boxwood (green velvet) the first two years. Last season, i never covered it and only some of the tips turned yellow. I figured it was mature enough so I got lazy this season again but some of the shrubs turned completely yellow after this winter. Any saving it? I just put down some fertilizer and watered it. Before the winter, i put down fertilizer spikes as well. Is the best alternative to cut the dead parts out and hope the new ones grow? or can i just leave it yellow and hope that watering and fertilizer will bring it back to life? haha.

selling the house this summer or early fall so don't want to remove it or replace it.
I think you needed to use something like this...also it's best to protect them from harsh winter weather

https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/wilt ... 1992p.html
[OP]
Deal Addict
Feb 26, 2016
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Vaughan
nielboy wrote: Boxwoods are pretty hardy. Just prune out the dead stuff and any stragglers that are still green.

Then fertilize with a 20-20-20 Fertilizer that will spur on new growth.

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/c-i-l- ... 1001204408
is the yellow stuff dead though or will it turn back to greeN? If i cut out all the yellow stuff, there'll pretty much be nothing left on some of the shrubs.
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Mar 22, 2017
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West GTA
I had a similar situation - the yellow didn't come back. You can prune it out and encourage the rest to fill in, but honestly it might be better to just buy new shrubs if damage is significant.
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Jun 12, 2008
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otaknap wrote: is the yellow stuff dead though or will it turn back to greeN? If i cut out all the yellow stuff, there'll pretty much be nothing left on some of the shrubs.
Yup it's dead. It needs to go to make way for new growth,
Newbie
Jul 12, 2019
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Honestly don't know if covering would have made a difference. I've never covered a boxwood and they never die. Beyond that, they look ugly as hell covered with burlap. One of the nice things about boxwoods is they provide green, year round. Don't see the point in planting something then covering it with burlap for months at a time. Maybe that's just me though!
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MrDurka wrote: Honestly don't know if covering would have made a difference. I've never covered a boxwood and they never die. Beyond that, they look ugly as hell covered with burlap. One of the nice things about boxwoods is they provide green, year round. Don't see the point in planting something then covering it with burlap for months at a time. Maybe that's just me though!
I've never covered any of mine either. Some fair better than others through the winter....might be some are more protected from the wind than others.
Member
May 12, 2009
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Toronto
Boxwood is pretty hardy. It also depends on location. While fertilizer is good it would be even better to add 2 to 4 inches of soil around it. In the fall water them well. If boxwood don't have enough moisture in the fall they will turn brown. Same thing with evergreens. One reason evergreen trees turn brown is lack of moisture. Trees that retain foliage in the winter transpire, unlike deciduous trees that drop leaves in the fall.
[OP]
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Feb 26, 2016
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Vaughan
serbianbelle wrote: Boxwood is pretty hardy. It also depends on location. While fertilizer is good it would be even better to add 2 to 4 inches of soil around it. In the fall water them well. If boxwood don't have enough moisture in the fall they will turn brown. Same thing with evergreens. One reason evergreen trees turn brown is lack of moisture. Trees that retain foliage in the winter transpire, unlike deciduous trees that drop leaves in the fall.
do you recommend soil or mulch?
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May 12, 2009
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otaknap@ Spread some compost around and add mulch on top of it. Mulch will keep the soil from drying out and will decompose over time.
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Mar 3, 2012
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HAMILTON
Sorry for going off topic but would it be a good idea to plant boxwood trees beside my iron fence for privacy?
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Igoran4s wrote: Sorry for going off topic but would it be a good idea to plant boxwood trees beside my iron fence for privacy?
They'll grow fine there but in my mind not tall enough for privacy. You might be better off with some Hicks Yews. They are really hardy and will grow to 6ft tall with little effort. They have a better spread distance too; can be spaced 5 ft apart. If you want your privacy sooner I'd plant them closer together.

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