Food & Drink

Burger King is planning to test reusable containers starting next year as part of its efforts to reduce waste

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 4th, 2020 5:12 pm
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Burger King is planning to test reusable containers starting next year as part of its efforts to reduce waste

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Nov 28, 2019
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Seems like Tim Hortons will be doing this as well (guess it makes sense, since BK owns them)

https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/tim-h ... soc_trk=ma

They should offer a discount on your next meal when you return the containers and not charging a deposit. This seems like such a hassle and I doubt most people will opt in for this, if they would make it mandatory I can see people just throwing these away and creating more waste. The whole point of Fast food, is for people who are to lazy to cook and don't want to do dishes.

Now they think people will start collecting these and return them?

Soon everywhere you go you will have to bring the house along, going to need to bring your reusable bags everywhere, your mask everywhere, your metal straws, your utensils and now your returns to the restaurant you visited the week before.
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I thought their waste reduction strategy was making food progressively worse to scare away customers or generate more green leftovers.
Autocorrect sucks
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jimbob12341 wrote: Seems like Tim Hortons will be doing this as well (guess it makes sense, since BK owns them)
Will we see the same @ Popeye's next? (all three are under the same parent company)
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playnicee1 wrote: Will we see the same @ Popeye's next? (all three are under the same parent company)
hmm, I am not sure maybe for their chicken burgers and stuff but imagine for boned chicken, I can see people dining in and eating and leaving all the bones in and stuff and returning it.
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jimbob12341 wrote:

Now they think people will start collecting these and return them?
Not sure what hood you live in, you clearly haven’t seen people lining up outside liquor stores every morning eager to return cart loads of beer cans and bottles.

If the containers can hold up for a few re-uses and RBI commits to the program, they will have a reliable return supply chain.
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The Tim Horton's article says the cups and food containers would then be cleaned, sanitized and used again.

How durable are these things? What are they made of?

I see how beer and wine bottles can be returned and reused. How are they going to do this?
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Mar 22, 2005
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I'm all for this so long as it's easy to do.

I'm generally a pretty environmentally conscious person where waste is concerned. Fast food is terrible for the environment.
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Can people actually trust these min wage workers to now handle this additional workload in addition to making their food?
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Etch my initials into the containers for fun.
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GangStarr wrote: I thought their waste reduction strategy was making food progressively worse to scare away customers or generate more green leftovers.
They tried that first with Tim Hortons, but they realized no matter how terrible their products are, people are still too lazy to make a cup of coffee at home, and would rather drink the sewer water from Tims.
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Shaner wrote: They tried that first with Tim Hortons, but they realized no matter how terrible their products are, people are still too lazy to make a cup of coffee at home, and would rather drink the sewer water from Tims.
Scary enough, the coffee @ Burger King IS far worse than the coffee @ Tim Horton's, so is IS possible to sell something far worse.
Believe it or not, it would actually be an improvement if BK were to stop selling their coffee and instead go with "Now selling Tim Horton's Coffee" as their selling point for Coffee.
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playnicee1 wrote: Scary enough, the coffee @ Burger King IS far worse than the coffee @ Tim Horton's, so is IS possible to sell something far worse.
Believe it or not, it would actually be an improvement if BK were to stop selling their coffee and instead go with "Now selling Tim Horton's Coffee" as their selling point for Coffee.
That makes a lot of sense. Get timmys buyers into Bk but that would in general cause worries about confusing brands or quality. Since neither have quality anything you’d think it’s moot.

I wonder why they don’t cross sell.
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GangStarr wrote: That makes a lot of sense. Get timmys buyers into Bk but that would in general cause worries about confusing brands or quality. Since neither have quality anything you’d think it’s moot.

I wonder why they don’t cross sell.
An example of cross sell is the A&W inside the Bloor Food court (near Bloor subway station)
They replaced the usual A&W coffee (Van Houtte?) with Countrystyle coffee. (I have no idea why? Nobody's complaining about the usual A&W coffee)
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GangStarr wrote: That makes a lot of sense. Get timmys buyers into Bk but that would in general cause worries about confusing brands or quality. Since neither have quality anything you’d think it’s moot.
Burger King's breakfast business would grow 20X overnight if they served Tim Hortons Coffee.

Unfortunately I think there would be a Tim Hortons franchisee revolt of epic proportions if they did that.

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