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Buy AF-S Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G IF ED VR now or wait for new release?

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Dec 29, 2013
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Montr

Buy AF-S Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G IF ED VR now or wait for new release?

Some canadian stores are having a sale on this. However, there are rumors a new release is coming since this lens version is 10 years old.

I may need it sometime this summer.
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May 5, 2010
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I have never seen any revision or update of Nikon lenses that is significantly better than the old one. Usually, the image quality stays the same but they improve the design, VR and/or motor. So maybe you'll get 1 stop more of VR, maybe it'll look better but one thinh is sure, it's always more expansive than the old one.

If you need it now and it's on sale, get it.
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Jun 22, 2006
4170 posts
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North York
I just bought this lens used on Thursday. So far I've been really impressed with the shots I'm getting compared to my 55-200mm. I'd say go for it if you can get a good deal.
If you drive dangerously I hope you get caught and lose your license/car/dignity! :twisted: :twisted:
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Jan 27, 2006
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When Nikon updates a lens, major image quality improvements only happen if the lens did not use a lot of the new 'lens technologies' that have been available in the last 15 years. For example, when Nikon updated the classic 50mm f/1.4 or f/1.8 a few years back to include AF-S, they also included many image quality enhancements to already great lenses - much of the improvements were due to the superior coatings that just wasn't available 25 years ago when the lenses where made. Another example would be the 85mm f/1.8 or f/1.4 when they went through a similar update.

Note that when I say image quality improvements, the improvements for most users can be considered minor unless the images are seen under high magnification or know exactly what to look for. For the average user, in the vast majority of the time, you won't be able to tell the difference.
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craftsman wrote: When Nikon updates a lens, major image quality improvements only happen if the lens did not use a lot of the new 'lens technologies' that have been available in the last 15 years. For example, when Nikon updated the classic 50mm f/1.4 or f/1.8 a few years back to include AF-S, they also included many image quality enhancements to already great lenses - much of the improvements were due to the superior coatings that just wasn't available 25 years ago when the lenses where made. Another example would be the 85mm f/1.8 or f/1.4 when they went through a similar update.

Note that when I say image quality improvements, the improvements for most users can be considered minor unless the images are seen under high magnification or know exactly what to look for. For the average user, in the vast majority of the time, you won't be able to tell the difference.
For the 50mm, it's pretty much the same overall for the image quality. By Dxomark, the T-stop and distortion got a tiny bit worse (not significant at all) while vignetting and CA got a tiny bit better (also not significant at all). Sharpness even drop a bit on the D810 but not on lower MP sensor cameras. And iirc, the autofocus got slower too, but it also got a hell lot quieter and making it compatible with entry level DSLR.
http://www.dxomark.com/Lenses/Compare/S ... 63_199_963

For image quality of a lens, less elements and better glasses make a better picture, that's all. Obviously, there's more to it on a lens, but to me, it's worth 95% of decision factors when I'm shopping for a lens.
Deal Expert
Jan 27, 2006
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That's why I stated "image quality improvements, the improvements for most users can be considered minor unless the images are seen under high magnification or know exactly what to look for. For the average user, in the vast majority of the time, you won't be able to tell the difference." The slight differences in the individual categories such as Lateral chromatic aberration might be enough for someone to get one version of the lens over another.

Also, Dxomark measures the lenses based on a camera body so a different body will yield different results.
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Oct 8, 2007
1435 posts
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Bedford
Pick up a used Nikon 70-300 VR or Tamron 70-300 VC. I have owned 2 Nikon versions. Good performing lens for the money ( maybe $300 used ). Only issue is that it isn't fast aperture wise at all, and runs out of stream at dusk.

I just missed a Tamron VC model last week that went for $280.
Sr. Member
Nov 21, 2006
584 posts
362 upvotes
Not a bad lens for the price but don't expect razor sharp pictures
Even below 200mm at f8 it's pretty soft - forget 300mm

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