Automotive

Buying your next car

  • Last Updated:
  • Jul 3rd, 2019 10:46 am
[OP]
Member
Nov 18, 2017
205 posts
77 upvotes

Buying your next car

When and how did you decide that your car was too old or that you needed a new car? Did you only get a new car because of a growing family/ new safety features /or your car died, or do you keep your cars until they die. Beige Corolla rfd’ers should also give their input.
71 replies
Deal Fanatic
Feb 7, 2017
9451 posts
6739 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
Once upon a time, when we were younger ... it was common for folks to buy (or lease) new cars, and then trade them in every 4 or 5 years
It’s only since the late 1980s / early 1990s that I see the average Joe (or Jane) holding onto their cars much longer
Where 6 to 10 years is about the norm (even leases now run much longer than the old 4 year standard)
And around the 8 year mark, starting to think about their next vehicle

That’s how it’s been for us the last 20+ years

It’s a matter of starting to reason when things majorly are going to go wrong
And cost significant money to fix

Way i have always looked at has been
Once the payments are done
Then the car is paid for
So cost to keep it is negligible
Just the standard, running costs

But once repairs become part of the equation
Then it’s time to start looking around for the next vehicle
And unless it’s an exceptional vehicle (would consider myself lucky if a car gets to year 10+)
That seems to be Year 8
[OP]
Member
Nov 18, 2017
205 posts
77 upvotes
PointsHubby wrote:
Jun 18th, 2019 3:03 am
Once upon a time, when we were younger ... it was common for folks to buy (or lease) new cars, and then trade them in every 4 or 5 years
It’s only since the late 1980s / early 1990s that I see the average Joe (or Jane) holding onto their cars much longer
Where 6 to 10 years is about the norm (even leases now run much longer than the old 4 year standard)
And around the 8 year mark, starting to think about their next vehicle

That’s how it’s been for us the last 20+ years

It’s a matter of starting to reason when things majorly are going to go wrong
And cost significant money to fix

Way i have always looked at has been
Once the payments are done
Then the car is paid for
So cost to keep it is negligible
Just the standard, running costs

But once repairs become part of the equation
Then it’s time to start looking around for the next vehicle
And unless it’s an exceptional vehicle (would consider myself lucky if a car gets to year 10+)
That seems to be Year 8
Good point. I have an Acura at 177k 16 years old though lol. No issues, should run to 500k but it’s slightly depressing thinking about not buying another car before having kids, but it seems like the logical decision.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jan 9, 2011
5220 posts
5110 upvotes
Vancouver
I like to buy new and keep for the long term. Bought new Mazda 3 in 2007, drove it until October 2018 when someone plowed into me and it was totalled. Replaced with a used 2014 Kia Rondo because we we needed to buy something in a hurry and got a good deal on it.
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Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
22749 posts
8458 upvotes
I ordered my dream car straight from factory 10 years ago.
I'm driving it until something blows up.

Then I'm probably gonna cry since I haven't seen and/or driven anything that'd be a good alternative.

I want a Tesla but bigger than the X but I don't want the price tag. Or even half the price tag.
My go to is Police (like) vehicles since I'm a dick but I don't like the new Tahoes as much as the old.
Not a fan of Ford.
Definitely not a fan of most foreign companies due to stupid designs.
Recently rented a Mitsubishi and I want to punch the engineer.
Same with Nissan.
Sr. Member
Jun 12, 2008
697 posts
136 upvotes
Ripley
When we outgrew it. Drove a 2 door sports car until we were pregnant with our third. Drove a big old Buick sedan until we were pregnant with our 4th. Bought a minivan that literally rusted out around us. Traded it in and it was recalled due to rust 2 days later. Bought a 2004 Toyota Sienna - still driving it. Bought a 2008 Rav 4 when we had 4 drivers in the family and needed a second vehicle. Rav is our main vehicle now that we are down to two drivers and 2 kids.

We haven't had car payments since the 2 dr car.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Jul 25, 2018
643 posts
964 upvotes
Milton, ON
For me, the main thing has been maintenance/repair cost. Once I start having to worry about what's next to go, I get rid of it while it still has some value.
Newbie
Dec 11, 2011
64 posts
107 upvotes
CALEDON
The key indicator for car replacement for me is when the power is no longer sufficient. Cars are too powerful these days. Some vans have over 300hp. Some trucks have 700hp. If I'm at a red light in the middle lane and I need to pull away quickly to hop on the right lane to get onto the highway, its not acceptable to not have enough power to accelerate more quickly then the car next to me. If and when that ever happens, it's time to move onto something else.

It haunts me on the daily that I will pull along side a P100D, because, given my rule, I might be screwed financially.

I hope that helps.
Member
Jun 18, 2018
431 posts
210 upvotes
PointsHubby wrote:
Jun 18th, 2019 3:03 am
Once upon a time, when we were younger ... it was common for folks to buy (or lease) new cars, and then trade them in every 4 or 5 years
It’s only since the late 1980s / early 1990s that I see the average Joe (or Jane) holding onto their cars much longer
Where 6 to 10 years is about the norm (even leases now run much longer than the old 4 year standard)
And around the 8 year mark, starting to think about their next vehicle

That’s how it’s been for us the last 20+ years

It’s a matter of starting to reason when things majorly are going to go wrong
And cost significant money to fix

Way i have always looked at has been
Once the payments are done
Then the car is paid for
So cost to keep it is negligible
Just the standard, running costs

But once repairs become part of the equation
Then it’s time to start looking around for the next vehicle
And unless it’s an exceptional vehicle (would consider myself lucky if a car gets to year 10+)
That seems to be Year 8
Exactly this... once repairs start kicking in, it's almost guaranteed that problems will keep coming up.. and that's the time to get rid of it and get something new.

Whether you buy used or new, that's another conversation....
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 26, 2007
4176 posts
1810 upvotes
Toronto
When it's no longer happy wife happy life.
Deal Fanatic
Jun 24, 2006
6840 posts
1605 upvotes
peteryorkuca wrote:
Jun 18th, 2019 3:32 pm
When it's no longer happy wife happy life.
Yes, but is she happier with a new car more often or with $0 per month payments......
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
28424 posts
14201 upvotes
Ottawa
Wanted more space for the family and something that can tow the boat without struggling...ended up with a MY2016 Explorer Sport.
For the wife, we had a deposit on the Model 3 last year and cancelled (waited too long), sold the MY2015 RX350 to a coworker and bought a MY2018 RX350 F Sport.
We should be good for another few years, but may re-visit the EV market again.
Newbie
Jul 30, 2012
16 posts
5 upvotes
CHESTERVILLE
I'm about to buy new because my 2006 Mazda 3 Sport has, at just shy of 400,000km, become a bit of a dodgy proposition as far as safety while driving goes. She still goes, but the frame is rotting. It's time. :( But yeah, I tend to drive them till they die. I've definitely gotten my money's worth out of her!
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2004
24594 posts
4854 upvotes
sik20fan wrote:
Jun 18th, 2019 3:03 pm
The key indicator for car replacement for me is when the power is no longer sufficient. Cars are too powerful these days. Some vans have over 300hp. Some trucks have 700hp. If I'm at a red light in the middle lane and I need to pull away quickly to hop on the right lane to get onto the highway, its not acceptable to not have enough power to accelerate more quickly then the car next to me. If and when that ever happens, it's time to move onto something else.
Not sure a Trackhawk (I assume that's what you're referring to with the 700hp bit) is really a consideration here. It's going to be extremely rare, along with a Cayenne Turbo S e-Hybrid and that Lambo whatever it's called. And these are all SUVs anyway; not sure there's any actual pickups that are 700hp+, though I could be omitting something.
sik20fan wrote:
Jun 18th, 2019 3:03 pm
It haunts me on the daily that I will pull along side a P100D, because, given my rule, I might be screwed financially.
Yeah but this doesn't really make much sense because there's pretty much always going to be something faster than you. You could get a Demon but it's mainly only good in a straight line. Might as well just get an RS3 or TT-RS, mod it up a bit and be able to gap super/turbocharged supercars.

I mean hey you can always get ahead on the P100D once it slows down after 170km/h or so, but then again you and the Tesla driver have already had your cars towed and your licences suspended by that time :lol:

In short, street's not a place for racing anyway, right? :P

Wait what was this thread about now? lol
Jr. Member
Mar 11, 2019
126 posts
51 upvotes
After I realized I could save 3 - 400 bucks a month in gas by not driving a pickup truck I didnt need.

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