Home & Garden

Can I use food oil on a pine surface?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 17th, 2020 12:29 am
Tags:
[OP]
Deal Expert
Dec 4, 2010
18719 posts
1937 upvotes
Quarantine Bubble

Can I use food oil on a pine surface?

https://www.ikea.com/ca/en/p/bror-work- ... mAQAvD_BwE


Picked up a ikea bror workbench with the expressed purpose of using it as a prep surface. Can I sand and treat it with vegetable oil or do I need some other type of food grade stain and oil treatment? Looking to make it a darker tone.


Is this what I need?

https://www.ikea.com/ca/en/p/stockaryd- ... -20240462/


Thanks!
16 replies
Sr. Member
Nov 6, 2014
565 posts
854 upvotes
Woodbridge, ON
I might suggest leaving it as is and resurfacing it with hardie board. When the hardie board gets dirty or worn you can replace it cheap. Hardie board is super smooth and easy to clean up. Add a couple of coats of eurothane/varithane and it'll last long time. :) Thats what I did to both of my work benches and very happy. If you stain or damage the pine which is softer than the hardie board, it won't be easy to return back to normal.
Last edited by fordmaple on Jun 5th, 2020 7:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Newbie
Mar 3, 2017
41 posts
21 upvotes
Calgary
Ikea sells the oil, I don't think it's very expensive.
If that's too expensive, use mineral oil. Vegetable oil can go rancid
[OP]
Deal Expert
Dec 4, 2010
18719 posts
1937 upvotes
Quarantine Bubble
chillguy153 wrote: Ikea sells the oil, I don't think it's very expensive.
If that's too expensive, use mineral oil. Vegetable oil can go rancid
I figured that might happen. I amended the post with the product they carry.

I think I’ll go with maples suggestion.
[OP]
Deal Expert
Dec 4, 2010
18719 posts
1937 upvotes
Quarantine Bubble
fordmaple wrote: I might suggest leaving it as is and resurfacing it with hardie board. When the hardie board gets dirty or worn you can replace it cheap. Hardie board is super smooth and easy to clean up. Add a couple of coats of eurothane/varithane and it'll last long time. :) Thats what I did to both of my work benches and very happy. If you stain or damage the pine which is softer than the hardie board, it won't be easy to return back to normal.
Is hardie board food grade safe? All the searches show exterior projects.
Sr. Member
Nov 6, 2014
565 posts
854 upvotes
Woodbridge, ON
Oh, didn't realize it's for food prep. Apologies, I use my workbench for tools and fixing stuff. I honestly don't know if its food safe. I certainly would not recommend it for food as its a paper/wood/glue product that would likely absorb liquid if untreated. And eurothane/varithane is not food safe. I incorrectly assumed your use case. Don't use it for food prep.

That said a pine top is soft and if you're using it as a cutting board, it'll get "knifed" up real quick. Don't know what to recommend for pine and food prep other than oil.

I wouldn't stain/colour anything darker for food prep unless the stain was food safe.
Deal Addict
Oct 13, 2014
1938 posts
1231 upvotes
Just Moved To Somewh…
If you wish to use an oil definitely use mineral oil or pure tung oil, they are food safe and will not go rancid. If you wish to seal the wood use shellac (mineral oil is cheaper), shellac is a natural ingredient used in the making of many types of candy and some pharmaceuticals.
“Before one can have a Clue they must first accumulate 10 Inklings. That said, all it takes is one bad post and you erase all Inklings & Clues accumulated'"
Deal Expert
User avatar
May 10, 2005
34857 posts
8828 upvotes
Ottawa
Supercooled wrote: https://www.ikea.com/ca/en/p/bror-work- ... mAQAvD_BwE


Picked up a ikea bror workbench with the expressed purpose of using it as a prep surface. Can I sand and treat it with vegetable oil or do I need some other type of food grade stain and oil treatment? Looking to make it a darker tone.


Is this what I need?

https://www.ikea.com/ca/en/p/stockaryd- ... -20240462/


Thanks!
Food oil (canola or corn or other vegetable oil) will go rancid and get sticky.
Oil for wood should be food grade if you are going to use it for food preparation. Tung oil, linseed or mineral.
These can also be used on wood workbenches. Mineral oil is the most accepted.
The Government cannot give to anybody anything that the Government does not first take from somebody else.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Dec 26, 2005
16777 posts
1679 upvotes
Thornhill
Supercooled wrote: Is hardie board food grade safe? All the searches show exterior projects.
I’m pretty sure hardie board isn’t food safe.

Sorry, can’t help on recommending an oil.

bjl
What we do in life echoes in Eternity... and in Google cache.
RFD discounts for Schluter products
[OP]
Deal Expert
Dec 4, 2010
18719 posts
1937 upvotes
Quarantine Bubble
Back for some guidance.


I started sanding with 80 and then 100 and finished it not with 120. I started in sections so I could feel the difference and each progressive grit gave better texture and after manual sanding for what I would say 15 minutes I was satisfied and gave it a wipe down. After the surface dried it felt like it was when I first started! I’m thinking the smoothness sensation was from the wood dust acting as a lubricant. There is a very slight difference but it’s still not enough imo.

How long should I be sanding this to achieve a level of smoothness where I won’t feel the wood grains when I run my hands against the grain or does that come after I stain and lacquer?

Thanks
Deal Addict
Oct 13, 2014
1938 posts
1231 upvotes
Just Moved To Somewh…
Supercooled wrote: How long should I be sanding this to achieve a level of smoothness where I won’t feel the wood grains when I run my hands against the grain or does that come after I stain and lacquer?

Thanks
Almost any type of moisture will cause the wood fibers to stand out (especially soft wood). The smoothness you want will only be achieved after stain and lacquer. Even then final smoothness will be after a couple of coats of finish, sanding between each coat.
“Before one can have a Clue they must first accumulate 10 Inklings. That said, all it takes is one bad post and you erase all Inklings & Clues accumulated'"
Deal Expert
User avatar
May 10, 2005
34857 posts
8828 upvotes
Ottawa
Supercooled wrote: Back for some guidance.


I started sanding with 80 and then 100 and finished it not with 120. I started in sections so I could feel the difference and each progressive grit gave better texture and after manual sanding for what I would say 15 minutes I was satisfied and gave it a wipe down. After the surface dried it felt like it was when I first started! I’m thinking the smoothness sensation was from the wood dust acting as a lubricant. There is a very slight difference but it’s still not enough imo.

How long should I be sanding this to achieve a level of smoothness where I won’t feel the wood grains when I run my hands against the grain or does that come after I stain and lacquer?

Thanks
Do not lacquer the cutting board. Remember that you will be cutting into the wood and the lacquer will chip off.

Here is proper way of preparing the surface https://www.hunker.com/13403815/how-to- ... ing-boards

https://ahomecrafter.com/2019/03/food-safe-wood-stain/
The Government cannot give to anybody anything that the Government does not first take from somebody else.
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
13587 posts
6516 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
How smooth do you want your cutting surface? Most of the time you won't mind a bit of grain as any smooth surface won't survive for long once you start cutting it with a nice sharp knife!

As for oils, my goto finish for cutting boards has always been mineral oil with just a bit of beeswax warmed in a double boiler so that the beeswax melts into the oil and the oil gets a thicker consistency - you don't need much beeswax as a little goes a long way here. Why beeswax? Because beeswax has been a foodsafe finish for wood for centuries, gives a nice finish, and gives a nice cutting surface. I like mixing it in with mineral oil as the oil allows the mixture to be better absorbed into the wood. Just do three to four coats until the surface basically stops absorbing the oil mixture. Once that's complete, wipe the surface dry (might take two or three good wipedowns for that to happen) then you can create a beeswax paste (once again a mixture of beeswax and mineral oil but more beeswax so that the mixture is a thick paste at room temperature) and apply a nice coat on top. Re-apply the beeswax paste to refresh the finish. As a bonus, you can use the beeswax paste to wax any wood surface including furniture!
[OP]
Deal Expert
Dec 4, 2010
18719 posts
1937 upvotes
Quarantine Bubble
I think there is a misunderstanding. I won’t be cutting into it per se as any cutting will be on a cutting board but I would like to knead dough on it and possibly use a dough scraper so that is about the only a ration it will see.

I don’t see any lacquer on ikea website. Can any lacquer do? I picked up another sanding kit from the dollar store with some 160 or 180 grit but more importantly it has a block where before I had to improvise. When sanding are you just gently gliding over the surface or using a considerable pressure to strip the wood? I used both techniques and doh d pressure obviously made it faster. I imagine the orbital sanders put quite a bit of pressure so no worries there.

Pete, I’ll have to read that link later today when I have time so apologies if it covers some of the questions I’ve asked.

I’ll have to see where I can source some beeswax. Thanks for the suggestion. Everything is very new for me.
Deal Addict
Dec 18, 2009
1704 posts
894 upvotes
Toronto
DO NOT LACQUER IT. Get yourself some mineral oil or salad bowl oil or paste. I made my own beeswax and mineral oil paste and it is great for my wood furniture and cutting boards. Works very well for dry lips and skin and have started making small bottles as gifts - men get furniture polish, women get skin balm . psssssst it's the same thing.

Top