Wheels and Tires

can someone tell me if this is patchable?

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 18th, 2019 12:31 pm
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[OP]
Member
Jan 21, 2009
407 posts
20 upvotes

can someone tell me if this is patchable?

this hole i got on my tire is bigger than a nail so im wondering if the patch is gonna work on it .
as u can see the tires are pretty new
but im little worried about the damages on the side of the tire that rim made when the tire went flat and i was driving on the road for abit not realizing i had a flat tire.
in conclusion tires got flat i had to chance to spare tire .
sorry for not explaining percisely it at the start
thx for your input in advance
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Last edited by Smoky1818 on Oct 12th, 2019 4:38 pm, edited 3 times in total.
20 replies
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jul 30, 2007
29164 posts
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Toronto
the nail head appears to be embedded into the tread block and should not have made any puncture. The tire is believed to be patchable.
Deal Fanatic
Oct 26, 2008
6389 posts
2037 upvotes
BC
Whatever the object is, it seems to have first got lodged between tread blocks and then torqued against the one tread block during cornering.

Can't be sure if it has made one or two entry points, if any.

Presumably the tire is losing air or you wouldn't be asking. But sometimes an object like that doesn't go fully through and a patch is not needed.

If it was a nail, screw, staple etc. that fully penetrated then patchable. If it was a larger piece of sharp metal that fully penetrated then probably not.
Deal Expert
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Jul 30, 2007
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Toronto
With added pics of sidewall, you were driving the flat tire for a fair distance and resulted of excessive wear. I can’t say if the sidewall has been damaged, if you can afford a new tire, then get new one.
Member
Jun 10, 2008
466 posts
334 upvotes
Halton Hills
I would not say that tire safe. The puncture is not the problem. It's the sidewalls that are toast from driving with low/no pressure. I wouldn't be surprised if the tire is shredded inside.
Deal Addict
Sep 8, 2017
4147 posts
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GTA
That tire is done. You can tell by the damage on the sidewall that the tire was driven on with no air in it. The inner structure of the tire is damaged and cannot be repaired.

I can see TPMS sensors in the picture. The warning light would have been on, but you kept driving. How did you not realize?
Deal Fanatic
Jun 24, 2006
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Gutty96 wrote: Yup. For sure it is.
Now seeing the sidewall I change my vote. Needs to be taken off the rim for internal inspection, then you will know.
Deal Fanatic
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Dec 28, 2007
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Alberta
Safer to replace the tire instead of trying to fix it.
[OP]
Member
Jan 21, 2009
407 posts
20 upvotes
alrite thx alot guys this sucks as the tire is pretty new : '''(
gotta change it to new tire this tire is garbage now.
if only i knew i had a flat tire ? at the start . But how would i know.\
i had the tire balance sign thing on and i pumped the air into the tire and the thing was still on for few weeks until i ran into that little metal flake peice that punctured it and im guessing it made hole on the tire same day. but if i didnt hear the weird flapping sound from the tire i would not have not known and i didnt even have my stereo on at the time.
So how do u detect flat tire before u damage your tire???? seems like a impossible task unless u check ur tires everytime u get on .

and does anyone know any good tire place like simply tires but not as busy??
Deal Fanatic
Oct 26, 2008
6389 posts
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BC
Smoky1818 wrote: ....... But how would i know.
i had the tire balance sign thing on and i pumped the air into the tire and the thing was still on for few weeks until i ran into that little metal flake peice that punctured it ....
1. "the tire balance thing" is the low pressure warning from your TPMS (nothing to do with tire balancing)

2. your car probably requires you to reset the TPMS after you have adjusted pressure

3. an underinflated tire heats up more than properly inflated ones and your nose should be able to detect that

4. a different feel of the car while driving with a severely underinflated tire may be detectable to a driver with acute senses

5. investment in a pressure gauge which is used every couple of weeks or so can pay off handsomely

6. monitoring the tires while parked for signs of foreign objects is always a good idea

7. choose a tire shop that is likely to have the same model of tire as opposed to looking for the least busy ones
Deal Addict
Sep 8, 2017
4147 posts
4283 upvotes
GTA
Smoky1818 wrote: if only i knew i had a flat tire ? at the start . But how would i know.\
i had the tire balance sign thing on and i pumped the air into the tire and the thing was still on for few weeks...
So how do u detect flat tire before u damage your tire???? seems like a impossible task unless u check ur tires everytime u get on .
Oh boy. You might want to read your owner's manual to find out what that "tire balance sign thing" means.
[OP]
Member
Jan 21, 2009
407 posts
20 upvotes
called around few places for prices and went with ceo as they had the best prices and got a new tire and im good now thx all for your input have a good day guys : )
Deal Fanatic
Oct 26, 2008
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BC
Good on you for updating us.

Happy motoring.
Deal Guru
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Dec 2, 2008
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thisischris wrote: I would not say that tire safe. The puncture is not the problem. It's the sidewalls that are toast from driving with low/no pressure. I wouldn't be surprised if the tire is shredded inside.
how can u tell just from outside? i have seen inside looks mint before................ hard to call
Sr. Member
May 2, 2017
828 posts
1069 upvotes
qaz393 wrote: how can u tell just from outside? i have seen inside looks mint before................ hard to call
You can tell by the wear ring on the sidewall of the tire. It was driven for some time with no pressure, that wear ring is caused by the metal rim pushing the sidewall directly into the ground. The rim is acting as a sort of dull pizza cutter in this scenario, trying to cut through the sidewall with every revolution.
If you ever get a flat tire, pull over to the side of the road as soon as safely possible. Driving on for any significant distance will destroy the tire as in this case.
Deal Guru
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Dec 2, 2008
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TheTall wrote: You can tell by the wear ring on the sidewall of the tire. It was driven for some time with no pressure, that wear ring is caused by the metal rim pushing the sidewall directly into the ground. The rim is acting as a sort of dull pizza cutter in this scenario, trying to cut through the sidewall with every revolution.
If you ever get a flat tire, pull over to the side of the road as soon as safely possible. Driving on for any significant distance will destroy the tire as in this case.
how many tires have you pulled like this before? Face With Tears Of Joy

give op some hope
Member
Jun 10, 2008
466 posts
334 upvotes
Halton Hills
qaz393 wrote: how can u tell just from outside? i have seen inside looks mint before................ hard to call
Just from my experience it's obvious the tire was driven with low or no pressure. Even if the inside isn't shredded, I bet if you poke that worn out ring with your finger it'll be noticeably softer than the rest of the sidewall.
[OP]
Member
Jan 21, 2009
407 posts
20 upvotes
macnut wrote: 1. "the tire balance thing" is the low pressure warning from your TPMS (nothing to do with tire balancing)

2. your car probably requires you to reset the TPMS after you have adjusted pressure

3. an underinflated tire heats up more than properly inflated ones and your nose should be able to detect that

4. a different feel of the car while driving with a severely underinflated tire may be detectable to a driver with acute senses

5. investment in a pressure gauge which is used every couple of weeks or so can pay off handsomely

6. monitoring the tires while parked for signs of foreign objects is always a good idea

7. choose a tire shop that is likely to have the same model of tire as opposed to looking for the least busy ones

thx i got myself a tire pressure gauge from canadian tire at $18 nothe crappy one lol and now its all fixed.
[OP]
Member
Jan 21, 2009
407 posts
20 upvotes
macnut wrote: Good on you for updating us.

Happy motoring.
after all the help i got from people here its the least i can do brother : )
and the whole point of have a forum

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