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[Canada Computers] Canada Computers Seagate 3TB USB 3.0 Expansion Drive Portable External Hard Drive $109.99

[OP]
Temp. Banned
Jan 5, 2017
262 posts
213 upvotes

[Canada Computers] Canada Computers Seagate 3TB USB 3.0 Expansion Drive Portable External Hard Drive $109.99

How much it is discounted is hard to say.
66% off of Best Buy price.
32% off of Newegg.ca price.

15% off of Canada Computer price but that may already be 25% off their normal.
13 replies
Newbie
Feb 9, 2017
5 posts
I am in the market for 3 or more TB drives for a good price (as per my previous thread) and doing a search I came across this one. I notice it's getting negative reviews. Could someone explain to me why, is it the drive itself, the seller, or should it be cheaper? Thanks!
Sr. Member
Jan 12, 2017
535 posts
192 upvotes
We've seen a spate of these drives in recent memory, and it's not like they are to be trusted. I've gone through 3 passport drives from WD and all failed. The last 2TB from Costco had a 3 year warrant and it failed in less than a year, I was pleasantly surprised when Costco took the return. (thought I'd have to go through RMA, that's one for Costco). Anyway I digress, some of these drives (WD for sure) are what is called 'frankendrives', interfaces that are melded to the drive and can be used in nothing else, and doesn't offer the option of throwing the interface aside and trying the raw drive in a desktop that has salvage tools. Top that with the fact that larger drives take larger amounts of energy and that USB ports are limited in this regard, so much so that at one point WD was offering a two plug 'Y' cable solution to users who complained the drive didn't even start-up. A lot of my friends have come by for a visit with one of these small drives (Seagate included) and the tranfer speeds are not at USB3 levels, one wonders what other issues (my friends say don't fill them up is the problem) guess they're not getting what they paid for.,

In short it's a one shot deal, Manufacturer Warranty: 1 Year, they're cute if it sits on the shelf as back-up but beyond that year.... you're gambling.

Suggestion: blow some money on a small SSD throw it into a USB portable case and it will do the job you wanted it to do. Leave mass storage to the full sized drives.
Member
Feb 15, 2015
286 posts
290 upvotes
Surrey, BC
Really good deal, but this item isn't for anyone outside of Quebec or Ontario.
Image
Deal Fanatic
Nov 15, 2013
5338 posts
3368 upvotes
Toronto
Funcypuntz wrote: I am in the market for 3 or more TB drives for a good price (as per my previous thread) and doing a search I came across this one. I notice it's getting negative reviews. Could someone explain to me why, is it the drive itself, the seller, or should it be cheaper? Thanks!
Unless you need the portable drive, I'd recommend getting a full sized drive as they tend to be more reliable.
[OP]
Temp. Banned
Jan 5, 2017
262 posts
213 upvotes
PatK621 wrote: We've seen a spate of these drives in recent memory, and it's not like they are to be trusted. I've gone through 3 passport drives from WD and all failed. The last 2TB from Costco had a 3 year warrant and it failed in less than a year, I was pleasantly surprised when Costco took the return. (thought I'd have to go through RMA, that's one for Costco). Anyway I digress, some of these drives (WD for sure) are what is called 'frankendrives', interfaces that are melded to the drive and can be used in nothing else, and doesn't offer the option of throwing the interface aside and trying the raw drive in a desktop that has salvage tools. Top that with the fact that larger drives take larger amounts of energy and that USB ports are limited in this regard, so much so that at one point WD was offering a two plug 'Y' cable solution to users who complained the drive didn't even start-up. A lot of my friends have come by for a visit with one of these small drives (Seagate included) and the tranfer speeds are not at USB3 levels, one wonders what other issues (my friends say don't fill them up is the problem) guess they're not getting what they paid for.,

In short it's a one shot deal, Manufacturer Warranty: 1 Year, they're cute if it sits on the shelf as back-up but beyond that year.... you're gambling.

Suggestion: blow some money on a small SSD throw it into a USB portable case and it will do the job you wanted it to do. Leave mass storage to the full sized drives.
I move my data around. So a full sized drive not convenient.
Newbie
Feb 9, 2017
5 posts
Jep4444 wrote: Unless you need the portable drive, I'd recommend getting a full sized drive as they tend to be more reliable.
I see, thank you.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 23, 2006
1132 posts
242 upvotes
Oshawa
Issue with these (if it is still the same drive models inside) was that they had higher than normal failure rate. I bought many of the 3TB portables (Expansion and I forget the name of the other model), plus the same 3TB internal drives and about 1/3 of them suffered from the 'click of death' sadly. There is actually a class action that is still underway. I put my name on the list, but who knows if it will ever go anywhere. I've never had a WD drive die on me yet, but that could just be shear luck more than anything. It's honestly a crap shoot with any HDD nowadays, but some models are much more prone than others.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 15, 2013
5338 posts
3368 upvotes
Toronto
venividivici wrote: Issue with these (if it is still the same drive models inside) was that they had higher than normal failure rate. I bought many of the 3TB portables (Expansion and I forget the name of the other model), plus the same 3TB internal drives and about 1/3 of them suffered from the 'click of death' sadly. There is actually a class action that is still underway. I put my name on the list, but who knows if it will ever go anywhere. I've never had a WD drive die on me yet, but that could just be shear luck more than anything. It's honestly a crap shoot with any HDD nowadays, but some models are much more prone than others.
These aren't even the same sized drives as the ones in the lawsuit and despite what people think, just having the same model number means little to nothing considering Seagate uses the 2nd part of the model number to distinguish batches and that is very relevant. More importantly, the lawsuit is based off of flawed data and user reviews from sites where every other review for every drive is a failed drive. If they get anything, considering yourself lucky.
Sr. Member
Jan 12, 2017
535 posts
192 upvotes
venividivici wrote: There is actually a class action that is still underway. I put my name on the list, but who knows if it will ever go anywhere.
Love to see a link to that action and put my name in.
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User avatar
Jan 14, 2014
2728 posts
539 upvotes
Price is good, but im still clenching my 3 year old 69.97 staples 3tb home network storage deals there was a thread that i maintained there when i was building this 30tb database. still running... seagate baracuda xt 7200rpm drives

But yeah betting on brand over another, is not wise... Every drive dies eventually..
-Staying away from known bad models using the reviews on newegg is a nice place to start.
-Dont keep a drive in 24/7 use longer than 3 years.
-I would only use higher end drives for my workspace environment. Videoediting is something i cant have a drive die, so I need WD black, not greens/blue wd's. I find with seagate i can get constallation the enterprise grade stuff quite cheap.
-Speaking of cheap I dont take risks on used drives on kijiji / craigslist .. Even when im selling a drive i post the smart info. alot of sellers dont.

Ive actaully had afew WD blacks die for friends that we keep rmaing so im not sure i think its just luck of the draw.

I trust seagate. even tho spinning rust is not the best way to hold data anymore its still the cheapest so i invest in drives regularly.

P.S I have a CC giftcard id like to turn to cash if someones going to brampton, etobicoke or vaughan location we can meet. Inbox me.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 23, 2006
1132 posts
242 upvotes
Oshawa
Jep4444 wrote: These aren't even the same sized drives as the ones in the lawsuit and despite what people think, just having the same model number means little to nothing considering Seagate uses the 2nd part of the model number to distinguish batches and that is very relevant. More importantly, the lawsuit is based off of flawed data and user reviews from sites where every other review for every drive is a failed drive. If they get anything, considering yourself lucky.
I do realize now this is a 2.5" and not the 3.5" model - I merely went off information on the Canada Computers website, which actually designates it as a 3.5" drive in the specifications. That aside I still do not see how your assertion of 'skewed data' is fully correct. More than anything you might be able to say it is a gray area due to Backblaze using the consumer drives in an enterprise setting (and this was real world usage over actual test settings). Still the data is useful on various levels and many who work within data/storage fields have argued that.

I personally have ~25 of the ST3000DM001 drives and at least 1/4 of them I know for sure have completely failed, while the rest I have not confirmed one way or the other. All this was within normal consumer usage prior to the drives ceasing to function properly. After the Thailand flooding manufacturers jacked up prices, cut down warranties and it seems Seagate produced a suspect drive. This wouldn't be the first time that something like this happened where an entire drive model was plagued by an issue causing above average failure rates.

At the time I went with price point for the drives opting for the more affordable Seagate drives. At the time there was no reason to suggest to avoid these drives. Seagate used reliability of their 1TB platters as a selling point for the drives and yet they knocked warranties down to 1 year, why? Coincidence perhaps, but honestly if consumers were reporting high failure rates I think Seagate should have deemed there was a problem and perhaps offered replacements based on say a 3 year window as a courtesy if nothing else.

For what it is worth though to anyone who might be interested by the data: https://www.backblaze.com/blog/3tb-hard-drive-failure/ and I found some of the comments here to be interesting in dissecting Backblaze's data and people who know the field saying it had some relevance still: https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/54 ... edibility/
PatK621 wrote: Love to see a link to that action and put my name in.
https://www.hbsslaw.com/cases/seagate

Seems earlier this month a judge upheld the claims after Seagate attempted to have it dismissed. I added my name last year just to see what happens. Personally I'd love to have any data recovered and functioning drives again.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 15, 2013
5338 posts
3368 upvotes
Toronto
venividivici wrote: I do realize now this is a 2.5" and not the 3.5" model - I merely went off information on the Canada Computers website, which actually designates it as a 3.5" drive in the specifications. That aside I still do not see how your assertion of 'skewed data' is fully correct. More than anything you might be able to say it is a gray area due to Backblaze using the consumer drives in an enterprise setting (and this was real world usage over actual test settings). Still the data is useful on various levels and many who work within data/storage fields have argued that.

I personally have ~25 of the ST3000DM001 drives and at least 1/4 of them I know for sure have completely failed, while the rest I have not confirmed one way or the other. All this was within normal consumer usage prior to the drives ceasing to function properly. After the Thailand flooding manufacturers jacked up prices, cut down warranties and it seems Seagate produced a suspect drive. This wouldn't be the first time that something like this happened where an entire drive model was plagued by an issue causing above average failure rates.

At the time I went with price point for the drives opting for the more affordable Seagate drives. At the time there was no reason to suggest to avoid these drives. Seagate used reliability of their 1TB platters as a selling point for the drives and yet they knocked warranties down to 1 year, why? Coincidence perhaps, but honestly if consumers were reporting high failure rates I think Seagate should have deemed there was a problem and perhaps offered replacements based on say a 3 year window as a courtesy if nothing else.

For what it is worth though to anyone who might be interested by the data: https://www.backblaze.com/blog/3tb-hard-drive-failure/ and I found some of the comments here to be interesting in dissecting Backblaze's data and people who know the field saying it had some relevance still: https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/54 ... edibility/



https://www.hbsslaw.com/cases/seagate

Seems earlier this month a judge upheld the claims after Seagate attempted to have it dismissed. I added my name last year just to see what happens. Personally I'd love to have any data recovered and functioning drives again.
See I think BB did a pretty good job of dissecting why one can not simple assume it is a byproduct of the ST3000DM001 in general. Also, because the vast majority of such drives BB used were produced in the aftermath of the floods, it's impossible to assert that there is a problem with the drive in general. Especially since they produced the drive for close to 6 years and the drive itself could not have been affected by the floods for it's entire lifespan. Moving to whether Seagate knew or not, how do we even know that one of their vendors wasn't too blame, passing them parts of varying quality, that they knew would hold up initial testing but not long term? As for the warranty part, if all manufacturers did it in response to the floods, it's reasonable to argue that it was a cost cutting measure after the cost of their operations increasing. If you want to argue they should have done something out of courtesy, go for it but it's not a valid argument in a court of law.

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