Food & Drink

Canadian localized food not found outside of canada

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  • Apr 5th, 2018 2:13 pm
[OP]
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Jan 27, 2004
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Canadian localized food not found outside of canada

Can anyone think of localized canadian food? Or even just a type of preparation that is very localized to a part of Canada? It only qualifies if you can't reallt find it outside of Canada.

I'll shoot...

1. Hotdog stands with bacon bits and dozens of condiments. I noticed that its a Toronto thing to have hot dog stands with a dozen sometimes even 50 different type of condiments. Some even hide cheese and fried onions in the back (even though its illegal).
Just ask. As long as you dont look like a public health narc

2. Sriracha and hoisin sauce on vietnamese pho.
This is more of a vietnamese north-american thing. They do it in the states. I'm not sure about other countries with vietnamese immigrant populations like australia. But in vietnam, they don't have sriracha and dont eat pho like we do in north america.
It seems to be a way of eating vietnamese food thats been created by viet immigrants to north america.
I blame the great success of huy fong foods for creating sriracha sauce in the 70's
48 replies
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May 28, 2012
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Saskatoon
I can only think of snack foods, like Cheezies, ketchup chips, Hickory Sticks. Maybe some chocolate bars. I know the chocolate tastes different in the States.
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Jun 21, 2016
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although they don't have sriracha in Vietnam they have chilli sauce, which is the same, just not the brand sriracha

as mars said, chocolate bars like coffee crisp

id guess maple cookies (the maple leaf shaped ones) are a Canadian thing, maple syrup lollipops, maybe even pure maple syrup

probably moose burgers, although not sure

I haven't really seen anyone talk about beaver tails (the pastry) outside of canada but it may have been picked up elsewhere
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Oct 3, 2004
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toronto19850 wrote:
I haven't really seen anyone talk about beaver tails (the pastry) outside of canada but it may have been picked up elsewhere
Beaver Tails are nothing original, they're also known by other names such as elephant ears
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Apr 9, 2008
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Toronto
"Sriracha and hoisin sauce on vietnamese pho."

definitely sounds very canadian
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Dec 28, 2008
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Halifax-style donair

Ginger beef, apparently

I'm going to assume Saskatoon berries aren't available outside Canada
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Mar 14, 2006
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Toronto
Ketchup flavored chips not avail in US
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Jun 21, 2016
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swales wrote: Beaver Tails are nothing original, they're also known by other names such as elephant ears
eh I googled it, doesn't really look the same but I guess they're both fried dough pastries
but then I guess nothing is original, you can get a hotdog in America, just not the hotdog with what the OP said, applies to everything in the thread really.
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Oct 3, 2004
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toronto19850 wrote: eh I googled it, doesn't really look the same but I guess they're both fried dough pastries
but then I guess nothing is original, you can get a hotdog in America, just not the hotdog with what the OP said, applies to everything in the thread really.
Beaver Tails now add a ton of stuff to theirs but the original Beaver Tail and an Elephant Ear are the exact same thing. Many Americans consider the Beaver Tail a total copy.
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Dec 3, 2009
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Toronto
Saskatchewan and Manitoba use honey dill sauce to dip fries and chicken strips into more commonly than plum sauce. I don't think I've seen a jar of honey dill sauce in Ontario.
Remember to be an RFD-er and NOT a degenerate.
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swales wrote: Beaver Tails now add a ton of stuff to theirs but the original Beaver Tail and an Elephant Ear are the exact same thing. Many Americans consider the Beaver Tail a total copy.
well I mean that's like saying poutine is a copy of French fries
and ketchup chips are a copy of regular potato chips

and in that case this thread would be pointless, no?
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Oct 3, 2004
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toronto19850 wrote: well I mean that's like saying poutine is a copy of French fries
and ketchup chips are a copy of regular potato chips

and in that case this thread would be pointless, no?
Not at all, it's the EXACT same thing but with a different name so your examples are not applicable. Many say the Beaver Tail is a total knockoff as they took the exact same product and just called it something different.
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Jun 21, 2016
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swales wrote: Not at all, it's the EXACT same thing but with a different name so your examples are not applicable. Many say the Beaver Tail is a total knockoff as they took the exact same product and just called it something different.
You're right, I was imagining things, exact same product

Image

Image
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Sep 23, 2007
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I struggle to come up with anything. When you talk about "hot dogs" with condiments you know there is nothing really special in Canada lol. Things like ketchup chips is nothing special. Even the famous Canadian poutine...I don't think it's that hard to replicate.

What I love about Canada is the abundance of variety in major cities like Toronto and Vancouver. Nowhere else in the world can you find such a diverse range of authentic ethnic food. There's Indian, Middle Eastern, Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Italian etc etc. Over the weekend I had Chinese for lunch, Iranian for dinner, and French lunch the day after. If you put the effort to plan (and have the $$$), you can eat something different every single meal for over a year.
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Dec 27, 2009
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Victoria, BC
Canada has lots of great foods, but I think many have migrated south of the border now. Many, many examples, but here's a few:

butter tarts
poutine
nanaimo bars
tourtiere
ginger beef
cheese curds
coffee crisp
eat more bars
caramilk
crunchie
wunderbar
crispy crunch
aero
big turk
Mr Big
Mars bar
smarties (chocolate version)
ketchup chips
dill pickle chips

hickory sticks
Deal Guru
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May 9, 2006
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Sriracha was popularized in the US by a man who immigrated from Vietnam and started selling the rooster sauce variation. That version of sriracha is very much a US product found in many Vietnamese restaurants across California where the trend spread across US and Canada and expanded to many different types of restaurants (not just Asian). Nothing uniquely Canadian about that.
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Aug 17, 2008
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Sask.
No Frills wrote: Saskatchewan and Manitoba use honey dill sauce to dip fries and chicken strips into more commonly than plum sauce. I don't think I've seen a jar of honey dill sauce in Ontario.
I just had honey dill sauce with chicken strips for the first time last week, have never even seen it offered before. It was good!

Other CDN treat is Ganong chicken bones.
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Jan 10, 2009
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Toronto
Chickinvic wrote: Canada has lots of great foods, but I think many have migrated south of the border now. Many, many examples, but here's a few:

cheese curds
crunchie
aero
Mars bar
smarties (chocolate version)
ketchup chips
Cheese curds can be found all over the world, though I will admit that Canadians and Wisconsonites take them to a new level.

Crunchie, Aero, Mars Bars and Smarties are all English chocolates, nothing Canadian about them. Just remade here with slightly worse chocolate.

Ketchup chips are easily found in the UK, though the vast array of other flavours means they're far from the most popular. I believe it's commonly considered that they are a Canadian invention though, but I'd be surprised if they weren't available in the UK prior due to the flavour profile and the range of flavours over there, however I have zero evidence or references.

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