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[Canadian Tire] Battery Tender $39.99 & $74.99 (20% off)

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 19th, 2020 7:27 pm
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[OP]
Newbie
Mar 7, 2011
38 posts
37 upvotes
craftsman wrote: You can do that but the main reason for one of these is to keep the battery in a condition where you can just start up and go. If you aren't planning to be able to just start up and go (hence the parking insurance), I would suggest the following:

1. Disconnect the battery.
2. Do some preventative maintenance on the battery - remove the battery, clean the exterior of the battery, if the battery fluid can be checked and filled, do it, and then charge the battery with an external charger and leave it disconnected once charged. Then charge the battery every month or so for a few hours (yep that's all it will take a few hours). When you want to use the car again, just coat the terminals with a thin coat of electric grease, and reinstall. You'll use a whole lot less electricity by only charging the battery a few hours a month than leaving it plugged in AND reduce the risk of fire. While not at all common, these types of chargers, in general, have been known to malfunction and end up overcharging the battery or may even short out.

Alternatively, if you don't want to disconnect the battery, you can plug the Battery Tender into a weekly appliance/light timer and set it to run for a few hours per week while being off for the rest of the week.
My purpose of this battery tender is for a motorcycle.
Would the suggestion you've noted above work for a motorcycle battery too?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Feb 1, 2009
3411 posts
2207 upvotes
Toronto
craftsman wrote: You can do that but the main reason for one of these is to keep the battery in a condition where you can just start up and go. If you aren't planning to be able to just start up and go (hence the parking insurance), I would suggest the following:

1. Disconnect the battery.
2. Do some preventative maintenance on the battery - remove the battery, clean the exterior of the battery, if the battery fluid can be checked and filled, do it, and then charge the battery with an external charger and leave it disconnected once charged. Then charge the battery every month or so for a few hours (yep that's all it will take a few hours). When you want to use the car again, just coat the terminals with a thin coat of electric grease, and reinstall. You'll use a whole lot less electricity by only charging the battery a few hours a month than leaving it plugged in AND reduce the risk of fire. While not at all common, these types of chargers, in general, have been known to malfunction and end up overcharging the battery or may even short out.

Alternatively, if you don't want to disconnect the battery, you can plug the Battery Tender into a weekly appliance/light timer and set it to run for a few hours per week while being off for the rest of the week.
Appreciate the thorough response!
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
14547 posts
7444 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
Temujin1 wrote: Charge your battery from dead in the winter and tell then tell me how much you like your 0.75A trickle charger.

I’m just saying that if you can afford it buy a higher A rating. It doesn’t have to be a Noco.
The point is for these things is not to charge your battery from dead in the middle of Winter but to charge your battery throughout Winter so that it doesn't have to start from dead.
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
14547 posts
7444 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
rikeelau wrote: My purpose of this battery tender is for a motorcycle.
Would the suggestion you've noted above work for a motorcycle battery too?
A flooded lead-acid battery is a flooded lead-acid battery. The only difference between a motorcycle battery and a car battery is typically the size which will result in more reserve capacity and cranking power. So, yes I do. Besides, by removing the battery from the motorcycle/car, you get the opportunity to inspect the battery and vehicle for damage - ie there might be some battery acid that spilled onto the vehicle which you can't see because the battery was in the way or that the plastic battery tray needs to be replaced....
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
14547 posts
7444 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
ssjlancer wrote: Im not convinced these canadian tire or even costco brands are any better than the chinese brands on amazon.
My gooloo works likes a champ.
https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07WF7 ... UTF8&psc=1
You can use them but like anything that is powered which may not have been properly tested, there will be some risk. Also, check out some of the threads here on RFD about how some no-name chargers (even some name brand ones) had their cable's insulation break down/crack in the cold Canadian Winters.
Jr. Member
Jun 10, 2020
166 posts
109 upvotes
Temujin1 wrote: Charge your battery from dead in the winter and tell then tell me how much you like your 0.75A trickle charger.

I’m just saying that if you can afford it buy a higher A rating. It doesn’t have to be a Noco.
This is a TRICKLE CHARGER, not a Battery Charger nor a Battery Booster. It's not designed for that purpose. It's for maintaining a battery and preventing sulfonation/preventing the slow death of an otherwise perfectly normal/useable battery (which HAS happened to quite a few people I know).

Get the right equipment for the right use purpose. 0.75A is BY DESIGN because it doesn't wreck the battery and can be constantly on. Those other charger/booster combos cannot do such a low trickle-charge and can wreck the battery in extended use scenarios. These can stay on a battery over the entire winter.
Member
Nov 13, 2013
426 posts
222 upvotes
Quebec
I bought the Battery Tender 4A Charger for approx. 39.99$ at Costco (in store) last year, don't know if they still have them but it might worth a visit.

Right now you can buy the Energizer Automatic Smart Battery Charger at costco.ca
8 Amp for 55.99$
4 Amp for 42.99$

Auto detect 6V or 12V batteries
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Deal Expert
Jan 15, 2006
15050 posts
12375 upvotes
Richmond Hill
Temujin1 wrote: Charge your battery from dead in the winter and tell then tell me how much you like your 0.75A trickle charger.

I’m just saying that if you can afford it buy a higher A rating. It doesn’t have to be a Noco.
Maybe you missed the thread title. Keyword here is tender, not charger.
Newbie
Jul 18, 2019
81 posts
46 upvotes
JP3ll3ti3r wrote: I bought the Battery Tender 4A Charger for approx. 39.99$ at Costco (in store) last year, don't know if they still have them but it might worth a visit.
They unfortunately do not carry them anymore. I went in last week specifically looking to buy one and they were not there
Deal Addict
Jul 7, 2009
1046 posts
552 upvotes
I am looking for a battery tender / mantainer as I'll be storing my car for the winter for the first time (thanks to COVID lockdown)

I'm looking at NOCO Genuis 1 vs Gooloo Smart battery charger ... anyone knows which is better?

And any reason to go to the more expensive Battery tender ? Are they better?
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
14547 posts
7444 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
DasHip wrote: This is a TRICKLE CHARGER, not a Battery Charger nor a Battery Booster. It's not designed for that purpose. It's for maintaining a battery and preventing sulfonation/preventing the slow death of an otherwise perfectly normal/useable battery (which HAS happened to quite a few people I know).

Get the right equipment for the right use purpose. 0.75A is BY DESIGN because it doesn't wreck the battery and can be constantly on. Those other charger/booster combos cannot do such a low trickle-charge and can wreck the battery in extended use scenarios. These can stay on a battery over the entire winter.
Actually, many of those other multi-stage smart chargers CAN be used for prolonged battery storage situations as well as they (like the Battery Tender) will turn itself off when the charging cycle is completed and start monitoring the battery. Once the battery drops below a certain voltage, the charger will turn back on and apply enough charge to get the voltage over the mark again. In other words, both, in theory, won't be constantly on... only on when needed.

However, the benefit of something like a lower current charger is not only the price but the fact that if something does go wrong, it will max out at a much lower current than something like a higher current charger which in turn may not end up overcharging the battery. But like I said before, if you are going to connect the unit to the battery for extended periods of time (ie several months), I would use it in conjunction with a light/appliance timer and only run it for a few hours every week once the initial charge is done.
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
14547 posts
7444 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
cba123 wrote: Princess Auto has their 12v float charger (0.5amp) on sale for $6.88, until Sep 28.
https://www.princessauto.com/en/detail/ ... -p8729188e

I've been using this on my FIL's car since the start of Covid to keep his battery topped up since it is only driven once a week for 12km.
Straight float chargers like this are old school and have been known to cook batteries over long periods of time as it doesn't shut off ever but just keeps pumping 0.5 A into the battery whether it is full or not. You can make it safer for the battery by putting it on a light timer so that it spends most of its time OFF.

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