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[Canadian Tire] Battery Tender $39.99 & $74.99 (20% off)

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Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
14527 posts
7428 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
Riffer wrote: Like others have said this won't bring back a battery from the dead like the old black one but it is okay if you are just below what the car needs to start.
Actually, it will as long as the battery was low and not fully sulfated. It will just take longer.
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
14527 posts
7428 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
number17 wrote: I am looking for a battery tender / mantainer as I'll be storing my car for the winter for the first time (thanks to COVID lockdown)

I'm looking at NOCO Genuis 1 vs Gooloo Smart battery charger ... anyone knows which is better?

And any reason to go to the more expensive Battery tender ? Are they better?
I would stick with either the NOCO or the Battery Tender and pass on the Gooloo as both NOCO and Battery Tender are established brands that you will be plugging in for hours in the Winter. The more expensive Battery Tender puts out a bit more power and is a lot bulkier but otherwise not too much different.

A better bet right now the Motormaster Precision 1.5A charger on for a $1 less than the Battery Tender Jr. It charges faster, has a battery meter which is important to see how much you have to go, repair mode which is great for older batteries, and the wires are made for low temperatures so that they will remain flexible in the cold.
Deal Addict
Jul 7, 2009
1046 posts
552 upvotes
craftsman wrote: I would stick with either the NOCO or the Battery Tender and pass on the Gooloo as both NOCO and Battery Tender are established brands that you will be plugging in for hours in the Winter. The more expensive Battery Tender puts out a bit more power and is a lot bulkier but otherwise not too much different.

A better bet right now the Motormaster Precision 1.5A charger on for a $1 less than the Battery Tender Jr. It charges faster, has a battery meter which is important to see how much you have to go, repair mode which is great for older batteries, and the wires are made for low temperatures so that they will remain flexible in the cold.
Reason I ask is I've heard horrible reviews where Battery tender jr has killed the battery by overcharging or caused a fire when plugged in 7/24, and if you look at the battery tender Jr it does look pretty ... cheap.

I've tried to stay away from Motormaster products for a long time, but if this charger is good I'll sure take a look. It is at the right price at least.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Dec 23, 2003
14395 posts
2898 upvotes
Toronto
Have a look at my Battery FAQ as I talked about my choices for battery chargers. I have reposted that section here for the benefit of others:

Battery Charger Suggestions:

Common questions that come up when talking about chargers are: What is a good battery charger for my vehicle? What additional benefits do I get from buying a $35 charger vs. a $70 or $100 charger?

To help answer these questions, here are my picks for battery chargers:

Good Basic Charger: Schumacher SC1279 8A 12V Rapid Charger: https://www.amazon.ca/Schumacher-SC1279 ... 07DM22XTN/

Features:

- Easy to use. Press one button and the charger tops the batteries and fixes any issues it may detect.
- Charges Standard, AGM, Gel, and deep-cycle batteries


Mid-grade charger: BatteryMINDer Model 1500: https://www.amazon.ca/BatteryMINDer-150 ... B00D7HZ6FC

Additional benefits from the basic charger:

- Temperature sensor to adjust the voltage in hot and cold environments. Prevents overcharging in hot weather.


NOCO GENIUS 2: https://www.amazon.ca/NOCO-GENIUS2-Full ... B07W6B987F

Additional benefits over the other 2 chargers:

- Dedicated modes for Flooded, AGM, Lithium batteries so that you can correctly set the battery yourself vs. the charger deciding for you.
- Charging of 6 Volt Batteries
- Force mode setting to help charge severely discharged batteries (i.e. sends a max Amp charge to the battery for a short period to "give it some juice" and then revert to a smart charger to get the battery fully charged.)


High-End model: NOCO GENIUS 5

What you gain here over the other 3 chargers is a dedicated repair feature for 12 Volt. This feature will help to remove any desulfation on the battery and work to get the max power out of the battery. I would run this feature every 6 months so that the desulfation is kept to a minimum and to prevent any internal shorts in the battery due to excessive buildup. Please note that to get the most out of this feature, you should do the following:

- Fully charge the battery with the regular mode depending on your battery type (i.e. flooded or AGM)
- After it has been fully charged, turn the charger off, disconnect the cables, and wait about 1 hour to let both the charger and battery rest.
- Connect the cables back to the battery and enable the recondition/repair mode. This will let the charger do what it can to remove the desulfation from the battery.
Car Batteries - FAQ, General Information, Tips & Tricks

Car Buying Tips & Tricks

My Cell Phone Providers: Koodo Mobile and Zoomer Wireless
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
14527 posts
7428 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
number17 wrote: Reason I ask is I've heard horrible reviews where Battery tender jr has killed the battery by overcharging or caused a fire when plugged in 7/24, and if you look at the battery tender Jr it does look pretty ... cheap.
Hence my suggestion about using these things in conjunction with a light/appliance timer! BTW> It's not just Battery Tenders that have done that in the past but lots of brands have also had reports of the charger overcharging the battery when they were left charging for months. I feel that a light/appliance timer is cheap insurance! You just need to be sure that the battery is fully charged to start with and you set the timer for enough time for it to top off the battery but nothing more.

I know what you mean about MotorMaster but the reviews on this one seem to be good especially when you compare it to the 4A model which doesn't seem to have as many glowing reviews. But this is a new line for CT so who knows what will happen in the longer term.
Jr. Member
Aug 21, 2011
119 posts
133 upvotes
Montreal
number17 wrote: Reason I ask is I've heard horrible reviews where Battery tender jr has killed the battery by overcharging or caused a fire when plugged in 7/24, and if you look at the battery tender Jr it does look pretty ... cheap.

I've tried to stay away from Motormaster products for a long time, but if this charger is good I'll sure take a look. It is at the right price at least.
Been using my battery tender jr since 2016 and it's plugged in 3-5 months at times, through winter and/or summer. Here's hoping my car/garage doesn't burn down someday :D

Also, seems like they updated the battery tender. Mine looks bulkier
Deal Addict
Jul 7, 2009
1046 posts
552 upvotes
craftsman wrote: Hence my suggestion about using these things in conjunction with a light/appliance timer! BTW> It's not just Battery Tenders that have done that in the past but lots of brands have also had reports of the charger overcharging the battery when they were left charging for months. I feel that a light/appliance timer is cheap insurance! You just need to be sure that the battery is fully charged to start with and you set the timer for enough time for it to top off the battery but nothing more.
Just to be clear, you are suggesting to put a timer on the tender, so that the tender is on for say, 12 hours a day every day (50% of the times) to avoid overheating?

Yeah that makes sense, and can be easily done. All these batty mantainer say they don't overheat but better to be safe than sorry.
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
14527 posts
7428 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
number17 wrote: Just to be clear, you are suggesting to put a timer on the tender, so that the tender is on for say, 12 hours a day every day (50% of the times) to avoid overheating?

Yeah that makes sense, and can be easily done. All these batty mantainer say they don't overheat but better to be safe than sorry.
I'm actually suggesting a lot less "on" time. Another RFD'er I've been talking to has their Battery Tender running 3 hours a week - yep, 3 hours per week - after they initially charged the battery using the same Battery Tender for 2 days straight. Your time for your battery might be different as that 3 hours was based on observations - ie charge the battery fully, wait a week without use and charge the battery again while checking how long before the Battery Tender stated the battery was fully charged. In their case, that was 2 hours but we added an extra hour just in case.
Deal Addict
Jul 7, 2009
1046 posts
552 upvotes
craftsman wrote: I'm actually suggesting a lot less "on" time. Another RFD'er I've been talking to has their Battery Tender running 3 hours a week - yep, 3 hours per week - after they initially charged the battery using the same Battery Tender for 2 days straight. Your time for your battery might be different as that 3 hours was based on observations - ie charge the battery fully, wait a week without use and charge the battery again while checking how long before the Battery Tender stated the battery was fully charged. In their case, that was 2 hours but we added an extra hour just in case.
Oh in that case I would have to be the 'timer' myself and manually plug / unplug the tender ... lol :)

My timers are not that smart ... I can turn it on / off for certain hours every day but I can't schedule it to turn on /off for specific days in a week.
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
14527 posts
7428 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
number17 wrote: Oh in that case I would have to be the 'timer' myself and manually plug / unplug the tender ... lol :)

My timers are not that smart ... I can turn it on / off for certain hours every day but I can't schedule it to turn on /off for specific days in a week.
You can always just do 3 hours or so a day as well.
Deal Addict
Jun 8, 2004
1469 posts
387 upvotes
Oakville
craftsman wrote:
Straight float chargers like this are old school and have been known to cook batteries over long periods of time as it doesn't shut off ever but just keeps pumping 0.5 A into the battery whether it is full or not. You can make it safer for the battery by putting it on a light timer so that it spends most of its time OFF.
craftsman wrote:
Hence my suggestion about using these things in conjunction with a light/appliance timer! BTW> It's not just Battery Tenders that have done that in the past but lots of brands have also had reports of the charger overcharging the battery when they were left charging for months. I feel that a light/appliance timer is cheap insurance! You just need to be sure that the battery is fully charged to start with and you set the timer for enough time for it to top off the battery but nothing more.

I know what you mean about MotorMaster but the reviews on this one seem to be good especially when you compare it to the 4A model which doesn't seem to have as many glowing reviews. But this is a new line for CT so who knows what will happen in the longer term.
craftsman wrote: You can always just do 3 hours or so a day as well.
I don't understand.

You say don't buy the $6.88 float charger (with automatic shutoff) as it doesn't have automatic shutoff and should be used with a timer, which implied you recommended buying the $39.99 battery tender instead (which you confirmed to buy instead of the Gooloo).

But, then you say don't use the $39.99 battery tender unless you use a timer with it as well.

So, why should one buy the $40 battery tender over the $6.88 float charger if you are going to use it with the same 3hr timer?

ps. I had the $6.88 float charger attached to a 12v SLA (UPS) replacement battery when my original UPS died (assumed it was the battery but the UPS died so I had a spare UPS battery until my other UPS needed a replacement battery), so I kept it topped up with the float charger (until my FIL's car battery died due to non-use during Covid). While the red light stays on all the time, the green light only stays on when float charging and turns off when the UPS battery was sufficiently charged. The green light would turn back on whenever the charge dropped sufficiently to float charge the UPS battery again. To me, this doesn't sound like a dumb 0.1C charger, but a basic float charger that uses a transistor circuit for the cutoff circuit (probably something similar to https://circuitdigest.com/electronic-ci ... la-battery). With my FIL's car battery, the green light has always been on when I go over every week and hasn't been off, presumably because the battery can't reach a high enough "full" charge any more (for the cutoff circuit to trip), plus the clock and other electronics continue to slowly drain the battery?
Sr. Member
Sep 24, 2004
718 posts
312 upvotes
Scarborough
number17 wrote: Oh in that case I would have to be the 'timer' myself and manually plug / unplug the tender ... lol :)

My timers are not that smart ... I can turn it on / off for certain hours every day but I can't schedule it to turn on /off for specific days in a week.
You could get a smart plug and use that. That may be an easier option to use in the long run.
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
14527 posts
7428 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
cba123 wrote: I don't understand.

You say don't buy the $6.88 float charger (with automatic shutoff) as it doesn't have automatic shutoff and should be used with a timer, which implied you recommended buying the $39.99 battery tender instead (which you confirmed to buy instead of the Gooloo).
It's all about these two units work. The $6.88 float charger puts out 13.5V (spelled out in the specifications) which is normal for a float charger (ie the float voltage should be about 13.5V) and always outputs 13.5V where the Battery Tender is a multi-stage charger (a low current one) which basically starts off trying to get to 14.4V (the standard charging voltage for standard lead-acid battery) as the voltage increases until it gets to about 80%, then it switches to a constant 14.4V for the remaining 20%. Once it gets to 100%, the multi-stage chargers move to a maintenance mode where the older ones basically become float chargers and change their output to 13.5V and stay there but the newer smarter ones will only stay there at 13.5V for a short period of time and then stop and switch over to monitoring the voltage on the battery and will only charge if the charger detects a significant voltage drop on the battery and then it will start charging again. The Battery Tender is a smart multistage charger while the float charger is not.

The float charger does say that it has an emergency auto-shut-off which implies that the 'auto-shut-off' doesn't happen in a normal course of it working but rather only in emergencies hence the float charger will apply power to the battery whether it needs it or not.
cba123 wrote: But, then you say don't use the $39.99 battery tender unless you use a timer with it as well.

So, why should one buy the $40 battery tender over the $6.88 float charger if you are going to use it with the same 3hr timer?
The timer is recommended for any charger but for different reasons. The float charger is needed because it will overcharge the battery if left connected and that's been well document across the 'net and the primary reason why the newer multi-stage chargers have all gone to monitor and charge once the charge is completed rather than the older float mode. The multi-stage chargers should have it as there have been documented cases where the charger never moves to monitor and charge and stays in float mode but they are few and far between compared to just float chargers so a timer is more of an insurance policy as the multi-stage chargers should shut off by itself.

cba123 wrote: ps. I had the $6.88 float charger attached to a 12v SLA (UPS) replacement battery when my original UPS died (assumed it was the battery but the UPS died so I had a spare UPS battery until my other UPS needed a replacement battery), so I kept it topped up with the float charger (until my FIL's car battery died due to non-use during Covid). While the red light stays on all the time, the green light only stays on when float charging and turns off when the UPS battery was sufficiently charged. The green light would turn back on whenever the charge dropped sufficiently to float charge the UPS battery again. To me, this doesn't sound like a dumb 0.1C charger, but a basic float charger that uses a transistor circuit for the cutoff circuit (probably something similar to https://circuitdigest.com/electronic-ci ... la-battery). With my FIL's car battery, the green light has always been on when I go over every week and hasn't been off, presumably because the battery can't reach a high enough "full" charge any more (for the cutoff circuit to trip), plus the clock and other electronics continue to slowly drain the battery?
The problem is that 13.5V isn't enough to properly charge a lead-acid battery to 100% of the battery's capacity. A charger needs to output 14.4V in order to charge a battery to 100%. The LED seems to be indicating that the battery got to 13.5V which is pretty simple to do but the battery isn't full as it can't be regardless of how long the float charger is connected to the battery as that's not what a float charger does.

The difference between your 12V SLA battery and the standard car battery is size and capacity - a car battery is much larger for both. As such, the float charger just can't output enough power to get the car's battery over the finish line. Now some people will say but the Battery Tender Jr outputs only a bit more power so won't the Battery Tender Jr have the same result? No because the Battery Tender Jr charges at 14.4V while the float charger only outputs at 13.5V. Even if the float charger outputted 10A, the float charger will never be able to charge a car battery.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Aug 16, 2011
928 posts
827 upvotes
NORTH YORK
This is a great battery tender. Used this exact one for 7 years and gave it to the new owner of my motorcycle when I sold it. You can also keep your battery healthy and charged if your car is stored in the winter etc.

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