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Canadian Tire Black Friday

Mastercraft 7.5A Impact Wrench, 1/2-in 70% off

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 2nd, 2021 8:36 am
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Member
Aug 13, 2003
485 posts
327 upvotes
Calgary
xfftwf wrote: AS WE ARE ON THE DISCUSSION OF TIRE CHANGE - please can someone help me with this. I did not have a father to learn these things from.

For two years in a row now, my tires are stuck to the hub. I tried kicking, fly kicking, smacking with rubber mallet, etc. nothing worked. The only thing that did the trick was to loosen all nuts, lower wheel to ground, could take couple tries up and down, and eventually the weight of the car 'pop' the wheel out.

It is a scary event every time.

Is there a better way of taking a stuck wheel off the hub? Is there anything I can do to prevent this?

Thank you very mucho.
What I do is what @Raimond already alluded to but in a more controlled manner. With your other loose tire (or spare tire, if that is what you are trying to put on), pick it up and swing it against the stuck tire on the left side and then the right side. You should be hitting the rubber and not the rim. Go back and forth with sometimes more force than you think for each hit. You may hear a loud crack as if you broke something but that sound is just the rusted rim and hub surface breaking free. No need to put lug nuts on loosely and let the vehicle down or drive around with loose lug nuts. No need for a 2x4 extra piece of wood or sledgehammer. With kicking, sometimes you can't generate enough force and you just end of hurting your foot. I will try with a quick back kick first but if it doesn't budge easily, just use what you already have, i.e. the other tire. Works perfectly every time for me. Just be careful you don't knock the car off the jack. And again, depending on how stuck, you might have to use more force than you would think but it works. You get a feel for it after you have done it a few times. I don't bother with anti-seize even though I could. Swinging the other tire always just works.
Last edited by DentDude on Dec 1st, 2021 1:43 pm, edited 5 times in total.
Sr. Member
Jul 23, 2012
503 posts
200 upvotes
Montreal
Uhnderated wrote: Buy a Milwaukee mid torque gen 2 18v fuel and never look back.
One of my favourite brand and tool. Have the high torque version as well which just takes things off with no effort but it's a thick boy and tough to use in tight quarters. Mid torque is more than enough, I love its size and weight and makes it incredibly easy to use in tight spots and it comes with an LED.

Another good tool from Milwaukee, their M12 tire inflator. Need to buy a separate battery for the M12 but if one has or buys the gen2 mid torque, the included charger allows for charging both the M12 and M18. Other than that, useful for infalting nearly anything, bike tires, car tires, ball, certain inflatables.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 2, 2018
1327 posts
1312 upvotes
Toronto
If you do tires in the driveway you can install a retractable electrical reel and that way you just pull and it extends to your car to plug in your impact wrench. When done just pull once more and the cord retracts.

Your point well taken however, deploying extension cords has always been a PITA.

For the gentleman with the 2x6 across the rubber tire I agree, however once I see an issue I use anti seize and eliminate the problem on that particular car moving forward. I only do three vehicles per season, got everything down to a science to get her done like a indy pitstop haha.
Youth is the gift of nature, age is a work of art.
Deal Addict
Nov 12, 2006
2338 posts
1412 upvotes
London
Magoo wrote: I got this year ago, used it for a couple of years to change tires and stopped because using an extension cord was a pain in the butt.
Ballroomblitz1 wrote: If you do tires in the driveway you can install a retractable electrical reel and that way you just pull and it extends to your car to plug in your impact wrench. When done just pull once more and the cord retracts.

Your point well taken however, deploying extension cords has always been a PITA.
What am I missing with this extension cord issue?

I have to get to my tires, which generally are buried in crap since the last change.
(Some people have them stored on elevated racks.)
Then drag out a heavy jack and chocks.
Then locate the required tools.
Grab the extension cord, plug in and unravel
Then get the air compressor out.
Do the changes, and reverse the process.

Out of all these, handling 1lb of extension cord is the pleasant part.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 3, 2007
2195 posts
627 upvotes
DentDude wrote: What I do is what @Raimond already alluded to but in a more controlled manner. With your other loose tire (or spare tire, if that is what you are trying to put on), pick it up and swing it against the stuck tire on the left side and then the right side. You should be hitting the rubber and not the rim. Go back and forth with sometimes more force than you think for each hit. You may hear a loud crack as if you broke something but that sound is just the rusted rim and hub surface breaking free. No need to put lug nuts on loosely and let the vehicle down or drive around with loose lug nuts. No need for a 2x4 extra piece of wood or sledgehammer. With kicking, sometimes you can't generate enough force and you just end of hurting your foot. I will try with a quick back kick first but if it doesn't budge easily, just use what you already have, i.e. the other tire. Works perfectly every time for me. Just be careful you don't knock the car off the jack. And again, depending on how stuck, you might have to use more force than you would think but it works. You get a feel for it after you have done it a few times. I don't bother with anti-seize even though I could. Swinging the other tire always just works.
Lol glad to hear the "technique" actually has some merit. Ya the tire being stuck on so hard like this only happened the one time, but now I know that this wasn't just a fluke.

That being said, I can't believe I cant find an actual deal for cordless impact wrench. Usually happens every year at around this time. The deals in this thread are almost regular price.
Sr. Member
Dec 15, 2017
687 posts
791 upvotes
Uhnderated wrote: Buy a Milwaukee mid torque gen 2 18v fuel and never look back.
the stubby m12 are so good I use them exclusively now. The 1/2" is good enough to take off lug nuts easily and it will do most of the bigger rusted suspension bolts too. the 3/8 with a universal is the biggest time saver. I think I got mine at $70-80 bare tool on sale.
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