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Maximum 7.25" Circular Saw with E-Brake (Corded) - $110

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 19th, 2022 12:41 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
Nov 21, 2014
2925 posts
5003 upvotes
Atlantic

[Canadian Tire] Maximum 7.25" Circular Saw with E-Brake (Corded) - $110

7.25" Circular Saw with E-Brake for $110
Sale from Dec 15-24

Combine with some triangle offers if possible
Last edited by EasyCompany251 on Dec 18th, 2022 7:11 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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49 replies
Member
Nov 13, 2019
248 posts
648 upvotes
Corded?? What year is it?

Many years ago I bought the maximum impact wrench. One stubborn bolt and it fried itself. I bought an Milwaukee M18 Fuel impact wrench next tire season. My point.... I bought two impact wrenches instead of just buying the good one first.
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Feb 25, 2004
1570 posts
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Longueuil
Dealliker314159 wrote: Corded?? What year is it?

Many years ago I bought the maximum impact wrench. One stubborn bolt and it fried itself. I bought an Milwaukee M18 Fuel impact wrench next tire season. My point.... I bought two impact wrenches instead of just buying the good one first.
It is a matter of preference. I am probably in the minority but I'll always take corded over battery without hesitation. I am a DIY, I don't use the tools everyday. I prefer to have corded knowing it'll be ready whenever I need it without waiting for it to recharge. And since I don't use them everyday, the battery would die long before the tool. I also like not to be locked with a specific company, I have tools from a bunch of different companies.

In 2022 I also use pneumatic nailers (with a air hose) because they fire fast and they are dirt cheap compared to battery nailers. I have a Ridgid compressor with LSA so I am good for a long time.

Milwaukee is a top brand, no doubt it is better than Maximum but it is not the same price. Still, I have been using a Mastercraft impact wrench (not even Maximum) for the last 17 years on my 2005 car without issues (the one of my father in fact that he also uses for his 2 cars).
Try not! Do or do not, there is no try...
[OP]
Deal Addict
Nov 21, 2014
2925 posts
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Atlantic
Dealliker314159 wrote: Corded?? What year is it?
Personally, I would prefer a corded tool when it comes to tools that require a lot of power or need to be operated continuously.
Sr. Member
Nov 10, 2003
916 posts
354 upvotes
EasyCompany251 wrote: Personally, I would prefer a corded tool when it comes to tools that require a lot of power or need to be operated continuously.
For continuous cuts, nothing beats a corded tool, which is why I still have my corded Hitachi 7.25".
Dealliker314159 wrote: Many years ago I bought the maximum impact wrench. One stubborn bolt and it fried itself.
Did you try and get it exchanged at Canadian Tire? I had a two year old Maximum wrench die driving a number of lags for a deck build and when I brought it back to Canadian Tire, they exchanged it for me with a brand new one off the shelf. Of course, YMMV but, in my case, Canadian Tire has been pretty good about honouring their warranty on their Maximum line.
Sr. Member
Sep 19, 2012
614 posts
349 upvotes
Kitchener
JEDI Force wrote: It is a matter of preference. I am probably in the minority but I'll always take corded over battery without hesitation. I am a DIY, I don't use the tools everyday. I prefer to have corded knowing it'll be ready whenever I need it without waiting for it to recharge. And since I don't use them everyday, the battery would die long before the tool. I also like not to be locked with a specific company, I have tools from a bunch of different companies.

In 2022 I also use pneumatic nailers (with a air hose) because they fire fast and they are dirt cheap compared to battery nailers. I have a Ridgid compressor with LSA so I am good for a long time.

Milwaukee is a top brand, no doubt it is better than Maximum but it is not the same price. Still, I have been using a Mastercraft impact wrench (not even Maximum) for the last 17 years on my 2005 car without issues (the one of my father in fact that he also uses for his 2 cars).
Lol if you charge the batteries when you're done they will always be ready to go for you as well...
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Feb 14, 2006
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Hammonds
EasyCompany251 wrote: Personally, I would prefer a corded tool when it comes to tools that require a lot of power or need to be operated continuously.
Or a rarely used tool. Nothing like fresh dead batteries to replace.
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Feb 25, 2004
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Tumdace wrote: Lol if you charge the batteries when you're done they will always be ready to go for you as well...
Yeah I guess it is very funny...

You do know that storing fully charged batteries will shorten their lifespan? And you know that batteries slowly lose their charge even when not in use?

But yeah, it is very funny... :facepalm:
Try not! Do or do not, there is no try...
Member
Nov 13, 2019
248 posts
648 upvotes
DC5R wrote: For continuous cuts, nothing beats a corded tool, which is why I still have my corded Hitachi 7.25".


Did you try and get it exchanged at Canadian Tire? I had a two year old Maximum wrench die driving a number of lags for a deck build and when I brought it back to Canadian Tire, they exchanged it for me with a brand new one off the shelf. Of course, YMMV but, in my case, Canadian Tire has been pretty good about honouring their warranty on their Maximum line.
I did not try and get it exchanged. I guess I could try but I'd rather in-store credit or cash back. It's definitely older than 2 years.
Deal Addict
Jan 13, 2009
1898 posts
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Ruciz wrote: Or a rarely used tool. Nothing like fresh dead batteries to replace.
this is why you should limit the number of ecosystems. Have one or two battery types and keep them all charged. How used or not used the tools are is irrelevant.
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Feb 14, 2006
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Hammonds
elfion wrote: this is why you should limit the number of ecosystems. Have one or two battery types and keep them all charged. How used or not used the tools are is irrelevant.
I am limiting it to one which is a wall cord. Unless I use it frequently it doesn't need a battery to replace.
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2001
18112 posts
9171 upvotes
Seoulkid wrote: Whats an e brake?
Electronic brake.

I assume you have used a circular saw. When you take your finger off the trigger do you notice that it takes quite some time to stop? It kind of just stops when it stops, nothing stops it from spinning. Typically not a problem when the blade guard closes properly as it protects the blade. However, there are circumstances where it doesn't always close on the blade and creates a potential danger.

So the electric brake works by simply reversing the flow of electricity to slow it down. It does wear out over time (and you can replace the parts yourself) but it should be years and years of use. It's not a complicated system at all, it's very simply. It really cuts down on the time it takes for the blade to stop, which removes that potential danger. I think it's about a second or so for the blade to stop with the brake.
Jr. Member
Dec 21, 2017
188 posts
385 upvotes
EasyCompany251 wrote: Personally, I would prefer a corded tool when it comes to tools that require a lot of power or need to be operated continuously.
I used to feel that way, but not anymore. Don't like dragging cords around and making sure they are out of the cutting path. If I need to operate a hand held circular saw for a long time, I'd pull out the mitre or table saw. Good cordless these days are almost as powerful as corded for most uses.
Deal Addict
Jan 13, 2009
1898 posts
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Ruciz wrote: I am limiting it to one which is a wall cord. Unless I use it frequently it doesn't need a battery to replace.
sure :) some people don't have any tools at all. can't make them :) can't make you convert to battery either. but believe me, if you are using any tools with any reasonable regularity, it makes a ton of sense to have at least one ecosystem. and if I could pick one for a homeowner it will 100% be Ryobi 18V. I have a crapload of batteries but I mostly use 4 x 4Ah + 2 x 1.5Ah and a 6 port supercharger. And I use them a lot, a few hours every single day.
Newbie
Nov 21, 2021
15 posts
14 upvotes
Ottawa
Dealliker314159 wrote: Corded?? What year is it?

Many years ago I bought the maximum impact wrench. One stubborn bolt and it fried itself. I bought an Milwaukee M18 Fuel impact wrench next tire season. My point.... I bought two impact wrenches instead of just buying the good one first.
If your usage was every tire change and you bought a Fuel, you drank so much kool aid your piss is now red Face With Tears Of Joy
Sr. Member
Nov 26, 2003
641 posts
557 upvotes
GTA
Dealliker314159 wrote: Corded?? What year is it?

Many years ago I bought the maximum impact wrench. One stubborn bolt and it fried itself. I bought an Milwaukee M18 Fuel impact wrench next tire season. My point.... I bought two impact wrenches instead of just buying the good one first.
1970?

I still use my dad's fifty year old circular saw.

I wonder where today's battery powered circular saws will be in half a century?
Sr. Member
Mar 20, 2016
566 posts
535 upvotes
Vancouver


Weight looks to be similar as a cordless (5kg), as corded the motor is heavier but it has no battery.
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Feb 25, 2004
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If you want to see a comparison of corded vs cordless tools, you can watch

Basically, if you compare expensive newer cordless tools (not the same story for older cordless tools) to cheaper corded tools, surprisingly performance is getting very similar and cordless usually has more features.

But if you compare for a specific price, the performance of corded tools destroys cordless tools. Look at the Milwaukee $200 corded vs $200 cordless M18 fuel sawzall
Corded: 5 seconds to make the cut
Cordless: 17 seconds to make the same cut! (funny that it says on the box that it cuts faster than corded)

I'll keep my corded tools. They are cheaper (and people get rid of great corded tools for crazy low prices on kijiji/fb to replace them with cordless) and will outlast any battery.

I have way too many brands to keep track of all those batteries anyway (Craftsman/Craftsman Professional, Black and Decker, Ridgid, Makita, Dewalt, Skil, Ryobi...)
Try not! Do or do not, there is no try...

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