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Canadian Tire

Ratcheting Wrench Set, 18-pc, Metric + SAE - $65 (80% off)

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  • Jul 29th, 2020 9:44 am
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Sr. Member
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Sep 13, 2004
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**If each piece bought separately, our combined Reg price would be $325.94.

Don't know many people that would buy each piece separately but that said, still not to bad of a deal.
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Oct 12, 2007
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I've said this before - these sets are terrible. The wrenches are okay for light to medium duty work but chances are, if you're working on a modern car, you have zero need for the SAE wrenches - I do not know of a vehicle made in the last decade that has SAE bolts.
So why pay for them. Plus, CTC sets always skip important sizes on the metric ones - which are the ones you need to work on cars. So, you're going to have to buy the 9 and 11mm sizes. At least these have the very commonly required 16mm and 18mm sizes that other Maximum sets skip. So that's good. But the deal killer for me is that these are 12 point ratchets but that's consistent with these being for light duty only.

If all you're doing is light work (say, brakes on a small car or minor underhood work like hose clamps and the like), this set is fine - but you may still need to spring for a 9mm and 11mm wrench.
Newbie
Mar 29, 2017
15 posts
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Toronto, ON
Aren't all American cars SAE? Also, in my experience 9mm, 11mm, 16, and 18 are not very common, at least on Japanese cars. Common ones I've seen for metric are 8, 10, 12, 14, 17, 19. I had a BMW that used a 16.
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Oct 12, 2007
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Spirit7 wrote: Aren't all American cars SAE? Also, in my experience 9mm, 11mm, 16, and 18 are not very common, at least on Japanese cars. Common ones I've seen for metric are 8, 10, 12, 14, 17, 19. I had a BMW that used a 16.
No. American cars are metric and have been for years. The changeover from SAE began in the 90s. Heavy trucks are still SAE I believe but these tools would be pointless for heavy trucks.
Member
Dec 13, 2008
459 posts
207 upvotes
Any other alternatives that fit a low-to-mid range budget?

Looking to get my first set, preferably ratcheting.
I'm just here for the deals....
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Jul 5, 2008
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I need an 18pc set of just 10mm wrenches. LOL

This set is too small to bother with. CT is getting to be less generous with the Maximum warranty too and argue more when needing replacements.
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Oct 12, 2007
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blisterd_nuts wrote: Any other alternatives that fit a low-to-mid range budget?

Looking to get my first set, preferably ratcheting.
If you just feel you would like a set of ratcheting wrenches but have no real specific idea of what you would use them for, you can buy this set or another like it. Chances are, though, you will not use the majority of these sizes.

My advice for people starting out working on cars is to start with good sockets. Ideally, a set that is just metric, has quality ratchets (at least 72 teeth and in 3/8 and 1/2 drives), and has all metric sizes from 7mm up to 20mm or beyond in both shallow and deep sockets. Preferably 6 point sockets as well. And that's it.

In time, add a full set of 1/2" (or 3/4") drive metric impact sockets.

And then... buy the one or two better quality 6 point ratcheting wrenches that you need because you find there's no room for sockets in some applications.

One of the advantage of this minimalist approach to buying tools is that you can convert the same budget into higher quality tools. The next is that your bolt heads will thank you. Finally, your tool box or socket carrying case will be smaller and lighter.

Anyway, I am just one person and that's my advice FWIW.
Member
Jun 11, 2015
477 posts
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Vancouver, BC
CaptSmethwick wrote: If you just feel you would like a set of ratcheting wrenches but have no real specific idea of what you would use them for, you can buy this set or another like it. Chances are, though, you will not use the majority of these sizes.

My advice for people starting out working on cars is to start with good sockets. Ideally, a set that is just metric, has quality ratchets (at least 72 teeth and in 3/8 and 1/2 drives), and has all metric sizes from 7mm up to 20mm or beyond in both shallow and deep sockets. Preferably 6 point sockets as well. And that's it.

In time, add a full set of 1/2" (or 3/4") drive metric impact sockets.

And then... buy the one or two better quality 6 point ratcheting wrenches that you need because you find there's no room for sockets in some applications.

One of the advantage of this minimalist approach to buying tools is that you can convert the same budget into higher quality tools. The next is that your bolt heads will thank you. Finally, your tool box or socket carrying case will be smaller and lighter.

Anyway, I am just one person and that's my advice FWIW.
I broadly agree.

This is a good price, but I wouldn't buy. Issues:

1) I've never used my SAE ratcheting wrenches.

2) I'm uncomfortable applying high torque using 12 point heads and a ratcheting mechanism, which means I'd be using a standard 6 point box wrenches to tighten and break bolts. If I'm already using a wrench, I'd rather just keep using it and do the old flip and twist.

3) If it's a tight enough fit I can't use a socket, I'd also want a flex head wrench which these aren't.
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Dec 28, 2008
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my dad bought me this a few years ago (on sale of course) and I've used them so much when working on my cars and boat. Very handy in tight spaces, etc...
Member
Dec 13, 2008
459 posts
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Thanks this helps.

I know I wont be using the SAE wrenches all too much, therefore I am hesitant on purchasing a set of tools where it includes them. Really, I'm just looking for a set that is within this cost range without all the extra tools I wont use. For example, if there was a set with only metric wrenches at a price point of $50, I would bite.
CaptSmethwick wrote: If you just feel you would like a set of ratcheting wrenches but have no real specific idea of what you would use them for, you can buy this set or another like it. Chances are, though, you will not use the majority of these sizes.

My advice for people starting out working on cars is to start with good sockets. Ideally, a set that is just metric, has quality ratchets (at least 72 teeth and in 3/8 and 1/2 drives), and has all metric sizes from 7mm up to 20mm or beyond in both shallow and deep sockets. Preferably 6 point sockets as well. And that's it.

In time, add a full set of 1/2" (or 3/4") drive metric impact sockets.

And then... buy the one or two better quality 6 point ratcheting wrenches that you need because you find there's no room for sockets in some applications.

One of the advantage of this minimalist approach to buying tools is that you can convert the same budget into higher quality tools. The next is that your bolt heads will thank you. Finally, your tool box or socket carrying case will be smaller and lighter.

Anyway, I am just one person and that's my advice FWIW.
I'm just here for the deals....
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Feb 5, 2006
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Toronto
blisterd_nuts wrote: Thanks this helps.

I know I wont be using the SAE wrenches all too much, therefore I am hesitant on purchasing a set of tools where it includes them. Really, I'm just looking for a set that is within this cost range without all the extra tools I wont use. For example, if there was a set with only metric wrenches at a price point of $50, I would bite.
I picked up a set of metric flex-heads for $50 on sale about 5 years ago at CT. 7 wrenches from 10 to 18mm (so 2 "missing").

Very nicely finished set. Haven't used them for much heavy work so can't comment on durability. 12-point ratchet ends of course, not 6.

These are co-branded Maximum and GearWrench. Not sure if that means you can go to GearWrench for warranty too.
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Dec 19, 2010
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Spirit7 wrote: Aren't all American cars SAE? Also, in my experience 9mm, 11mm, 16, and 18 are not very common, at least on Japanese cars. Common ones I've seen for metric are 8, 10, 12, 14, 17, 19. I had a BMW that used a 16.
They might not be common on any *modern* autos, but there are tons of SAE fasteners used for all sorts things where ratcheting wrenches are extremely helpful. Missing sizes are in sets are a problem, but that's common to almost all big box store sets.
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Oct 12, 2007
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DirtyDog wrote: They might not be common on any *modern* autos, but there are tons of SAE fasteners used for all sorts things where ratcheting wrenches are extremely helpful. Missing sizes are in sets are a problem, but that's common to almost all big box store sets.
There are indeed tons of SAE fasteners - hardware stores in North America are full of them - and it's useful to have at least one set of SAE tools to deal with them - whether that's sockets or wrenches. That being said, I would bet that few people need SAE sockets and SAE ratcheting wrenches. I honestly don't want to come across as arguing that people should not buy SAE tools but am raising the point that people might want to think about what they want to do with tools before buying ones that may just end up collecting dust. I personally have waaaay too many SAE tools and I wrench a lot more frequently than the average person. I haven't touched most of my SAE tools in 15 or 20 years and I certainly won't buy new ones.

What kills me about these sets is that they have missed metric sizes but the SAE sizes are all there - in faithful 1/16" increments. Oh, and they skip metric sizes but give you a 3/4" and 19mm wrench - which undoubtedly are exactly the same wrench (as the difference between these two are often within manufacturers' tolerances, they often use the same dies for both these sizes). I also wonder if this manufacturer uses the same dies for their 5/16" and 8mm tools (also pretty well the same size = just 0.06mm difference) - regardless, both are in this set.
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2004
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LULUMON wrote: I had a good laugh at regular price. Would buy but I think i don't need more than 3 sizes for my car.
Even the sale price ain't great. You can get these way cheaper at HF when on sale plus coupon. Only problem is you can't get to one now of course :(
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Mar 23, 2004
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CaptSmethwick wrote: No. American cars are metric and have been for years. The changeover from SAE began in the 90s.
I think it's more like the 70s they started changing and by the 90s they were definitely entirely there.

No engineer likes to work in imperial I don't think. It absolutely sucks. All weird numbers, conversion factors, slugs (like wtf kind of unit is that lol), etc.
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ES_Revenge wrote: I think it's more like the 70s they started changing and by the 90s they were definitely entirely there.

No engineer likes to work in imperial I don't think. It absolutely sucks. All weird numbers, conversion factors, slugs (like wtf kind of unit is that lol), etc.
You're right. It began in the late 70s for sure but even then some cars had engines that had imperial bolts and wheel lugs too but the rest of the body fasteners were metric. By the 90s, that was mostly gone; there were still some hold-outs but not many.

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