Travel

canned drinks in checked baggage

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  • Jul 12th, 2022 4:07 pm
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Member
Jul 13, 2019
294 posts
91 upvotes

canned drinks in checked baggage

is canned juice, V8 ,etc ok?
21 replies
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2007
1160 posts
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Toronto
yes. Has never exploded on me, but pad it well anyway. Not a bad idea to put in ziploc bags in case it does explode. V8? Just get plastic bottles: less risk.
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
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Eastern Ontario
With the changes in temperatures & pressure … not to mention the aggressive tossing of bags by baggage handlers I’d think twice about packing anything carbonated which is more prone to explode than just break

But flat stuff … sure
Just cushion it extremely well
And double Ziploc it too
In case the worst does happen

We’ve had good luck with these for wine in the past
https://www.amazon.ca/UPGRADED-PROTECTI ... 07VRMQ5KB/
Deal Addict
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Aug 3, 2006
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Yes. I've done it numerous times over the past 15+ years bringing back cans of pop from Europe and Asia that isn't available in Canada. Usually I'll put them in a tied up plastic bag just in case but I've never had an exploded can.

Baggage holds on planes are pressurized. Any rough handling of baggage isn't any more rough than tossing a can of pop/beer to someone.
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May 9, 2009
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Montreal
Same, I've packed cans of energy drinks many times without issue. Tie em up in a plastic bag and pad them with clothes.
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Nov 22, 2015
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PointsHubby wrote: With the changes in temperatures & pressure … not to mention the aggressive tossing of bags by baggage handlers I’d think twice about packing anything carbonated which is more prone to explode than just break

But flat stuff … sure
Just cushion it extremely well
And double Ziploc it too
In case the worst does happen

We’ve had good luck with these for wine in the past
https://www.amazon.ca/UPGRADED-PROTECTI ... 07VRMQ5KB/
I hope you didn't pay $53 for some bubble wrap
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Jan 12, 2017
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So I can take lots of energy drinks with me? I meant carryon?
*SIG: Ryzen R5 2600 cpu w/ ASrock B450M OCd to [email protected] stock cooler 16gb ram win10 pro w/radeon rx460 rogers Gigabit<< xb1 gamertag: mikka2017 >>
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
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Eastern Ontario
mikka2017 wrote: So I can take lots of energy drinks with me? I meant carryon?
CARRY ON … Not unless you buy those Energy Drinks AIRSIDE (after Security) at the Airport
Last edited by PointsHubby on Jun 24th, 2022 6:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
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Eastern Ontario
KanataKG wrote: I hope you didn't pay $53 for some bubble wrap
It’s a bit more than just bubble wrap
The ones we use are …
Double bagged, sealable
And REUSABLE
So they are cost effective over time

Cost is relative too
It’s a small price to pay for multiple units / uses
If they are going to protect a $ 25+ bottle of wine
And keep your clothes from turning red wine in colour & ruined
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2001
17795 posts
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I have brought cases of pop back in my checked bag before and never had an issue. I think I once had a heavily dented can, but I don't think there was ever any spillage. Just watch the weight, I keep thinking it was about 10 pounds for a 12 pack.
Deal Addict
Jul 16, 2019
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Place it in a ziploc and then in a empty shoebox to protect it while in checked bags. Thats what I do with all liquids or delicate stuff without adding much packing weight.
Deal Guru
May 9, 2007
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Vancouver Island, BC
joyceetal wrote: is canned juice, V8 ,etc ok?
People put alcohol beverages in checked luggage all the time. You cannot have it as carryon unless it is bought at a duty-free store.
Global warming will be exceeded during the 21st century unless deep reductions in carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gas emissions occur (United Nations IPCC Report 2021)

Every disaster film starts with scientists being ignored
Member
Jul 7, 2019
460 posts
561 upvotes
Oilers Country
We bring alcohol in glass back from overseas all the time. What we do is toss a few winter woolens inside our checked bags before leaving home--no matter if we're traveling in July! Before flying home, we will then slip the bottle in a Ziploc and wrap a fluffy scarf around it or (with the small bottles) slip inside a woolen glove. Everything is perfectly soft and cushioned. I suppose you could use shirts or something, but we've found winter woolies work best because of the thick padding. It's worth it for the piece of mind against breakage. We've been doing this for years now and have treated family and friends to unique beverages from unusual places.

The same should work for any beverages you want to bring back--pad them well in something soft after using Ziplocs. (Although we've never once had a break or even a leak in all our years of flying.)
Member
Jul 7, 2019
460 posts
561 upvotes
Oilers Country
PointsHubby wrote: With the changes in temperatures & pressure … not to mention the aggressive tossing of bags by baggage handlers I’d think twice about packing anything carbonated which is more prone to explode than just break

But flat stuff … sure
Just cushion it extremely well
And double Ziploc it too
In case the worst does happen

We’ve had good luck with these for wine in the past
https://www.amazon.ca/UPGRADED-PROTECTI ... 07VRMQ5KB/
Good point--I wouldn't risk it with carbonated drinks, but non-carbonated beverages are fine to fly. And where possible, plastic is vastly preferred over glass, although some interesting drinks that you want to bring home may only come in glass bottles.

I remember once tucking a plastic bottled drink in my suitcase before the ride to the airport in Vienna, intending to get it out on arrival. However, the airport was busy and it wasn't until my bag had disappeared down the belt into the blackness that I realized I still had a loose beverage rolling around. I feared the worst until I landed back in Canada and checked--safe and sound, despite having no protection inside the suitcase!
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Feb 9, 2003
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Just be very careful not to open a ground pop in the air. The cans on airplanes are specially pressurized to be safely opened at altitude. Same with the bags of chips. You don't want to take someone's eye out with exploded chips, or pierce the airframe with shards from an exploded ground pop.
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Dec 18, 2007
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I've done it plenty of times. Beer and sparkling wines and never had any issues.
I used wine skins (https://www.wineskin.net/) and just use my own tape after for multiple uses. Usually are about $2-3 but I've seen them as high at $5-6 at some places.
For beers/can, I wrap them in a bag and then wrap in laundry. The extra wrap is just in case there is a spill/breakage.
Deal Guru
May 9, 2007
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Vancouver Island, BC
i6s1 wrote: Just be very careful not to open a ground pop in the air. The cans on airplanes are specially pressurized to be safely opened at altitude. Same with the bags of chips. You don't want to take someone's eye out with exploded chips, or pierce the airframe with shards from an exploded ground pop.
I suggest this is an urban myth. The cabins and cargo holds in airplanes have been pressurized since the 1940s. Typically, plane air pressure is comparable to being at 6,000 - 7,000 feet altitude.

https://aerospace.honeywell.com/us/en/l ... surization

That is lower than the elevation of the highway at Highwood Pass in Alberta.
Highwood Pass is a high mountain pass at an elevation of 2.217m (7,273ft) above the sea level, located in Kananaskis Country, in Alberta province of Western Canada.
https://www.dangerousroads.org/north-am ... -pass.html


Significant places in Mexico are at that elevation.
Elevations of 5,000 to 7,000 feet above sea level are not unusual for cities in Mexico’s colonial heartland as well as those in the southern states of Oaxaca and Chiapas. Mexico City and Guadalajara are also cities situated at elevation. Mexico City, for example, is not only 7,200 feet above sea level (that’s about a mile and-a-half up in the sky), it’s situated in a valley surrounded by mountains and flanked by two volcanoes.
https://www.mexperience.com/breathing-h ... in-mexico/

I frequently take snacks in factory sealed bags as my own snacks on planes. I have never experienced anything dangerous opening them.

I never died from low air pressure in a plane. My pets never died from low air pressure when in cargo. (I confess to sometimes being short of breath in Mexico City.)
Global warming will be exceeded during the 21st century unless deep reductions in carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gas emissions occur (United Nations IPCC Report 2021)

Every disaster film starts with scientists being ignored
Deal Addict
Jan 10, 2009
1484 posts
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Toronto
Yeah I never understood where this myth that cargo holds are not pressurized came from. The design of the pressure vessel of something like an airplane requires it to be pressurized with the rest of the vessel, otherwise it would be weakened and would require more complex design elsewhere. (Pressure vessels nearly always have a circular cross section as this is the most resistant to pressure, submarines, airplanes, spacecraft etc.) Additionally cargo holds are heated, as no one has ever gotten to their destination and wondered why their toiletries are all frozen solid. The only decision that can be made is how much heating and ventilation to give the cargo hold, if there are animals in there they will crank it up a bit.
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Feb 9, 2003
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MexiCanuck wrote: I suggest this is an urban myth. The cabins and cargo holds in airplanes have been pressurized since the 1940s. Typically, plane air pressure is comparable to being at 6,000 - 7,000 feet altitude.

https://aerospace.honeywell.com/us/en/l ... surization

That is lower than the elevation of the highway at Highwood Pass in Alberta.

https://www.dangerousroads.org/north-am ... -pass.html

Significant places in Mexico are at that elevation.

https://www.mexperience.com/breathing-h ... in-mexico/

I frequently take snacks in factory sealed bags as my own snacks on planes. I have never experienced anything dangerous opening them.

I never died from low air pressure in a plane. My pets never died from low air pressure when in cargo. (I confess to sometimes being short of breath in Mexico City.)
You are spreading dangerous misinformation. I've seen documentaries like "Airplane!", "Airplane II: The Sequel" and "Snakes on a Plane" so I'm very familiar with aircraft safety. I suggest you do not question me again.

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