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[OP]
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Mar 20, 2009
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Canning Peaches

Anyone here have any experience with canning peaches?

Am planning to give it a shot.
Likely peeled, halved, using a light syrup.
The less sugar, the better.


Just trying to figure out what is the best reasonable deal to find.
I'm in Toronto, so most likely Ontario peaches.

How much of a difference does type of peach make?

Starting Thurs, No Frills will have Farmers Market 3L Peaches for $2.77.
Are these any good for canning?

Then I see, on Thurs, Loblaws will have 7L Preserving Peaches for $12.

Seems like a steep difference in price.
Or will there be better deals in the next few weeks?
"When someone is burning a book, they are showing utter contempt for all of the thinking that produced its ideas, all of the labor that went into its words and sentences, and all of the trouble that befell the author . . .” ― Lemony Snicket
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Oct 27, 2009
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Ontario
No experience with canning peaches. Any chance you might know someone who has canned peaches for fall fair entries (as some fairs are scaled-down for 2021)?

Niagara Region used to have fruit institute. I just looked at Foodland Ontario and don't see a canning peach bulletin or tips sheet.

Found this Vermont canner's tips-avoid using white-fleshed peaches, there's an issue with canning them.
https://practicalselfreliance.com/canning-peaches/
Fall is here!😃
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May 28, 2012
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Saskatoon
You want freestone peaches and not over ripe or they will be really hard to deal with and result will be too soft. I haven't canned peaches in a while but did quite a few quarts of pears last summer (also in light syrup).

Another suggestion for you would be to make a peach jam using Pomona's Pectin. It's a citrus based pectin that uses a lot less sugar than Certo. I used four cups of mashed peaches and a little over a cup of cane sugar and it was plenty sweet and the fruit taste comes through rather than just the sugar. With this pectin, you can use any sweetener i.e. maple syrup, honey, regular sugar, etc. I could eat it straight out of the jar ;).
[OP]
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Mar 20, 2009
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Mars2012 wrote: You want freestone peaches and not over ripe or they will be really hard to deal with and result will be too soft. I haven't canned peaches in a while but did quite a few quarts of pears last summer (also in light syrup).

Another suggestion for you would be to make a peach jam using Pomona's Pectin. It's a citrus based pectin that uses a lot less sugar than Certo. I used four cups of mashed peaches and a little over a cup of cane sugar and it was plenty sweet and the fruit taste comes through rather than just the sugar. With this pectin, you can use any sweetener i.e. maple syrup, honey, regular sugar, etc. I could eat it straight out of the jar ;).
It's like you are a mind reader, lol.

A few days ago, I was gifted an unexpected box of pears.
I ended up lemon bathing, then canning these in 1L jars, cut in 1/4, skin on, using a light agave/honey/cinnamon/vanilla syrup.
The end result was pretty awesome.

I also boiled the removed cores, then strained with a jelly bag.
I also had some syrup left (where the pears were pre boiled prior to canning, to offset floaters).
Strained this, mixed it with the jelly bag juice, then froze it.
I froze it because instead of using store bought Pectin, I placed an order for a 454g bag of Pomona's, which I hope will be delivered by the end of the week.
Once it arrives, will thaw the juice, then make jelly.
I've never used it before, but have heard good things (especially for low sugar jellies).
Went with the bigger bag because my understanding is that it does not expire like other Pectins.

I canned halved peaches in a honey syrup last year for the first time.
To be honest - I wasn't too impressed with the results, though it was a learning experience.
It's not that they tasted bad - I just felt the peaches didn't have much taste.
Quite the difference when compared to the Pears I just made, where each taste is flavour country.
For several jars, I dropped in some cinnamon stick pieces prior to canning.
Rookie mistake - should have boiled into the syrup.
Some jars had way too strong of a cinnamon taste.
"When someone is burning a book, they are showing utter contempt for all of the thinking that produced its ideas, all of the labor that went into its words and sentences, and all of the trouble that befell the author . . .” ― Lemony Snicket
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May 28, 2012
11924 posts
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Saskatoon
Canned items usually sit around for a while and the flavours tend to intensify over time if you add spices like cinnamon, cloves, etc. Some people like that but if you find it too strong, it's probably best to fish it out before canning up. Same goes for savoury items when pressure canning...herbs like sage impart a bitter flavour and shouldn't be used.

The Pomona's product is very easy to use. There is a small packet included to make calcium water (mix with water and store in fridge). This goes in with the crushed fruit/lemon juice and the pectin gets mixed in with the sugar. Due to the low sugar content, you won't get the same exact consistency as full sugar jam/jelly - it will be a bit chunkier. The instructions are very basic and easy to follow.

I'm trying to remember the book I came across that featured Pomona's Pectin, I think it's Jam On: The Craft of Canning Fruit by Laena McCarthy.
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Jul 7, 2017
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Just did on the weekend. Peaches had to travel, even within province, so weren't picked ripe and weren't that sweet.
I smile when I see container ships sailing past my house laden with stuff made in China
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Sep 6, 2002
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Helpful thread, Good advice. I got out of canning a few years ago. When I moved to the country I ate a lot of peaches.

If I had my little way I’d eat peaches everyday. I’m off that now.

Thanks again for the tips
Autocorrect sucks
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Jul 7, 2017
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Not quite canned peaches but I found a few caseloads of canned apricots from RSA for $0.54/cn (700-780 ml) a few months ago. Good emergency rations and not even worth home canning at that price (not to mention no/few local apricots for the last couple of years).
I smile when I see container ships sailing past my house laden with stuff made in China
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Oct 23, 2017
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GTA West
shikotee wrote: Anyone here have any experience with canning peaches?

Am planning to give it a shot.
Likely peeled, halved, using a light syrup.
The less sugar, the better.


Just trying to figure out what is the best reasonable deal to find.
I'm in Toronto, so most likely Ontario peaches.

How much of a difference does type of peach make?

Starting Thurs, No Frills will have Farmers Market 3L Peaches for $2.77.
Are these any good for canning?

Then I see, on Thurs, Loblaws will have 7L Preserving Peaches for $12.

Seems like a steep difference in price.
Or will there be better deals in the next few weeks?
We just went down to Niagara and paid $38 for 2/3 bushel at the farm gate. I think that works out to $1.62/liter. Those were No. 1 Red Haven freestone which are our favourite for flavour. Last year was our first year to preserve and got good results. Preserved peaches are among the best tasting canned fruit, IMHO. We got lots of rave reviews from friends and people we gave them to as hostess gifts, etc. Some people like the little Baby Gold peaches that are firmer and hold up well in processing but I find those are like little rubbery balls in the jar.
[OP]
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Mar 20, 2009
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I was given another box of pears, so decided to experiment a little bit. Went to No Frills and bought their on sale 3L $2.77 peaches, and some green grapes. Had some frozen cherries (picked from my neighbours tree when they were in season).

My canner can do 7 1L jars at a time, so did some batch experimentation. For my first batch, went pears only. Made a syrup with Agave (purchased a huge jug from Costco Business Centre), cinnamon sticks, all spice, and vanilla extract. Boiled the pears (quartered - skin left on) for a few minutes, then filled up jars.

The remaining batches were different variants of fruit cocktails. First batch was pears, peaches, grapes, cherries. Second batch added blackberries (from my garden). Third batch added vanilla pods. Fourth and final batch was all above with blueberries added.

Once again, boiled the pear cores, strained in jelly bag, and froze juice. Will make jelly sometime next week. Might still get some more peaches and do them solo.

Looking forward to tasting and comparing the mixed fruits. It was exhausting, but the basement pantry shelves are stocked.

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"When someone is burning a book, they are showing utter contempt for all of the thinking that produced its ideas, all of the labor that went into its words and sentences, and all of the trouble that befell the author . . .” ― Lemony Snicket
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Oct 27, 2009
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Ontario
OP, you rock! That's amazing work. Loved reading the canning stories in this thread.
Fall is here!😃
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Sep 2, 2008
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Looks like I'm too late but...

Personally I would find out what variety is best canned. This kind of thing does matter imo since you are making big batches you want to make sure it turns out good.

I buy peaches from stands near Niagara on the lake. The two I go to are bizjak farms and quiet acres. They both have many varieties. They are all tree ripened, so good! They are much better eating than the supermarket ones you get in Toronto but I don't know how that difference translates into canning.

I haven't been, but I've heard of a peach packing barn called Olga's where you can get good prices on baskets of first or second grade peaches.

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