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Career as a Lecturer (non-academic)?

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  • Apr 8th, 2016 1:11 pm
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[OP]
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Sep 20, 2014
1456 posts
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Toronto, ON, CA

Career as a Lecturer (non-academic)?

Anyone know how to get their foot into the door of being a Lecturer?

Let's say I just want to teach/mark and not do research, where would I start?

It seems like a good job as it pays more than teaching but comes with less stress because the kids are older and therefore presumably more mature.
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Apr 11, 2010
252 posts
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Do you have a PhD and did you get substantial teaching experience during your studies? Also, are you published? If you answered no to these questions you're probably SOL.
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Oct 6, 2005
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kodiaktfc wrote: Do you have a PhD and did you get substantial teaching experience during your studies? Also, are you published? If you answered no to these questions you're probably SOL.
You could teach at a community college - some positions require less experience than a PhD.
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Apr 11, 2010
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coolspot wrote: You could teach at a community college - some positions require less experience than a PhD.
In theory yes. Some schools only require a Master's degree with experience (be it teaching or professional). However, the market is dictated by supply and let me tell you, there are plenty of PhD's willing to take positions at these schools. So for someone with only a MA to supersede the PhD, this experience would need to be quite substantial (i.e, 5 years in the field). I only really know of a few select individuals who lecture with a Masters.
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Jan 27, 2004
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its competitive and unstable work. Lots of contract work. Google York disputes. Lots of people who have the exact job you're asking about that are struggling...

There are lots of people with Phd's or Masters with field experience who seek out these jobs.
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Nov 24, 2004
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Many university departments in Canada have "teaching faculty" -- they are not contract lecturers (they have their own tenure track of sorts) but are rather professors who are solely involved in teaching and not research (they don't have research groups, don't apply for grants or publish except perhaps for pedagogical research).

From what I understand the pay is reasonable, not what a full research professor would earn. There tends to be heavy competition for these positions. I would imagine a PhD would be essential for most fields, as well as higher level teaching experience (not just being a course grader or lab TA).
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Apr 19, 2008
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What about career as a trainer? For example, training call center agents or other employees to keep them informed what's going on.
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Mar 3, 2016
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2009M5 wrote: Anyone know how to get their foot into the door of being a Lecturer?

Let's say I just want to teach/mark and not do research, where would I start?

It seems like a good job as it pays more than teaching but comes with less stress because the kids are older and therefore presumably more mature.
What are you qualified to teach? Do you have real-world teaching experience? Do you have a teaching degree? Do you have a PhD? Can you conceivably teach a variety of classes?

As a recent PhD graduate, I know some people who have applied for lectureship positions. Here's what I know:

- There are jobs of this sort offered by the major research universities. In my field in the sciences, I've never come across one of these job ads where a PhD wasn't a stipulation. The work is generally contract based of 1-3 years. Junior positions are typically taken up by recent PhD students with teaching experience while senior positions are intended for people with doctoral degrees who have done this kind of work before. Tenure-type jobs that rely solely on teaching are rumoured, but I've never personally seen one in my field in a research university or have ever met someone with this kind of job.

- Tenure-type teaching jobs are more prevalent at primarily undergraduate universities (think Bishop's or Mount Allison). These jobs are incredibly competitive with many applicants being freshly-minted PhDs or postdocs with extensive teaching experience who have decided not to pursue the research path of academia. More commonly on offer are contractual lectureship jobs. I do have a friend who teaches at Bishop's and only has a master's degree. However, it's from a US Ivy League school and she has a whack-tonne of real-world experience in her field. Her gig is only part-time; teaching one class, holding office hours and doing the necessary planning/grading is not a 40 hour a week endeavour, nor is it paid as such.

- Community colleges or Quebec CEGEPs are an option where only having a master's degree is necessary for teaching. I know a few people who have gone down this route and they all seem to enjoy it. However, I've heard these jobs have become more competitive in recent years due to the influx of applicants with PhDs.

At any rate, OP, depending on your qualifications and experience, perhaps you are competitive for some of these jobs. However, if you have just a bachelor's degree and are looking for a full-time lecturing job at the University of Toronto, you may have another thing coming.
[OP]
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Sep 20, 2014
1456 posts
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Toronto, ON, CA
Tonberry wrote: What about career as a trainer? For example, training call center agents or other employees to keep them informed what's going on.
Goal is to avoid large public (read: publicly traded) companies which can give you every excuse why there were no raises this year, why you weren't considered for the role, etc, etc. Aren't professors unionized or considered a public (government) sector employee? They get inflationary raises, OT, etc; as far as I know.

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