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Cat5e Wiring Help for New house

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[OP]
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Nov 28, 2008
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Toronto

Cat5e Wiring Help for New house

Im trying to crimp an ethernet wiring at. Mew. House I moved to. When i open up the cover to see the ethernet wire I see two ethernet net wires, the blue amd blue/white of both wires are. Connected. This is the came for two of the rooms. Other two rooms already have ethernet cable set up, and when i opened those i only see one wire. How do i set this up to connect to my computer?

Any one?
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Apr 16, 2001
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Two wires connected....might be already in use for a phone line.
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[OP]
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Nov 28, 2008
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Should i cut it and use it for ethernet connection?
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I agree that could be phone line. Builders will use the same CAT5-type cable for phone and ethernet. What does the jack look like, and can you take a photo of it?

I'd make sure you know where that cable is going on both ends, and that you don't need it as a phone line before cutting anything. Once you're sure, you can probably convert it to an ethernet cable if you like. Don't expect gigabit speeds is all.

If you go through with it, get a CAT5 keystone and follow the diagram they usually come with to match the colours up, less hassle. But don't forget the other end, it also needs to be wired properly with a jack or keystone.
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A new build and still using Cat5e?
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mrweather wrote: A new build and still using Cat5e?
I'm not sure it's a new house, or just new to the OP?
My house is a bit over 10 years old now and they used CAT5. I think I had to pay more for CAT6 but I said nah and just paid for the conduit pipe so I could do my own CAT6 cabling. Much cheaper overall and more flexibility to put cables where I wanted.
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[OP]
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Nov 28, 2008
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Toronto
I did post a picture of the cable. Theres no jack as of now, i have to put the ends and use crimping tool. I did see one ethernet cable on the basement connecting to a phone adapto, but im not sure where the other ends of the two cables in both rooms are going to. I guess I'll cut it and put ethernet ends amd test it out.
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Jun 24, 2015
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that wire is wired up for phone, its also daisy chained to other rooms so you can NOT use it for ethernet network, think of it as one LONG wire going thru all the jacks in your house. for ethernet you need MULTIPLE wires going to each room, not possible , sorry man, welp unless yo u want just one ethernet run
Hi
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mrweather wrote: A new build and still using Cat5e?
Its because its used as a phone line instead for internet.
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GoodFellaz wrote: that wire is wired up for phone, its also daisy chained to other rooms so you can NOT use it for ethernet network, think of it as one LONG wire going thru all the jacks in your house. for ethernet you need MULTIPLE wires going to each room, not possible , sorry man, welp unless yo u want just one ethernet run
This could be correct by the looks of the picture. So you'd get ethernet to the one room, but lose phone and potential ethernet to other rooms down the wire. Also consider that if it is Daisy chained like that prior to the room in your picture, the ethernet will not work in that room. If you want to experiment, then go for it.
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Ethernet cable contains 4 pairs (8 wires).

1000 base-T Ethernet jacks requires all 4 pairs.

10/100 base-T Ethernet jacks requires 2 pairs

A telephone jack requires 1 pair

Fortunately the blue/white pair which you currently have in use for your phone lines, is not one of the two required pairs for Ethernet 10/100.

If you only wire the orange/white and green/white to a keystone jack, then those jacks will be capable of carrying 10/100 Ethernet. You would need to place 2 keystone jacks in each location, one connected to each cable.

The phone line comes into your house from a demarcation box on the outside wall of your house. From there a CAT5 cable will go to a jack in the closest room,for example the kitchen, and the phone line will be carried on the blue/white pair. In the kitchen, the blue/white wires will connect to the wall jack, and also to the blue/white wires of a second cable which will run to the next closest room, perhaps the master bedroom.

This process of connecting one pair of wires to the same pair in the next cable is called daisy chaining. The phone jack in the master bedroom might then be daisy chained to another bedroom. This daisy chaining continues until telephone jacks appear in all the desired rooms.

Although you can carry Ethernet on these cables, daisy chained connections don't offer much use for home Ethernet. A properly wired home will have the Ethernet cable in each room all run to a central point. A router located at the central point can then distribute Ethernet to all the rooms.

The best you can do with daisy chained connections would be to place a router in one room, and connect to devices in the two adjacent rooms which are daisy chained. It could also be useful for example if the router was connected to the jack in the kitchen and a remote Wi-Fi access point was placed in the master bedroom on the 2nd floor, it that happens to be the two rooms connected by cable.
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Rick007 wrote: Ethernet cable contains 4 pairs (8 wires).

1000 base-T Ethernet jacks requires all 4 pairs.

10/100 base-T Ethernet jacks requires 2 pairs

A telephone jack requires 1 pair

Fortunately the blue/white pair which you currently have in use for your phone lines, is not one of the two required pairs for Ethernet 10/100.

If you only wire the orange/white and green/white to a keystone jack, then those jacks will be capable of carrying 10/100 Ethernet. You would need to place 2 keystone jacks in each location, one connected to each cable.
Sorry to hijack-
I've never realized this about 10/100 ethernet cable, that you only need 2 pairs. Or maybe I knew and I forgot, I'm used to wiring for gigabit now.
Theoretically, could you then take 1 CAT5 cable and create 2 jacks in the same room side by side? So 2 pairs on one keystone, 2 on another keystone? I have a situation where I have only one CAT5 outlet and would like to avoid running another cable there to make another. CAT5 would be an adequate speed in this scenario.
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BernardRyder wrote: Sorry to hijack-
I've never realized this about 10/100 ethernet cable, that you only need 2 pairs. Or maybe I knew and I forgot, I'm used to wiring for gigabit now.
Theoretically, could you then take 1 CAT5 cable and create 2 jacks in the same room side by side? So 2 pairs on one keystone, 2 on another keystone? I have a situation where I have only one CAT5 outlet and would like to avoid running another cable there to make another. CAT5 would be an adequate speed in this scenario.
You could, but why not use a switch?
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BernardRyder wrote: Sorry to hijack-
I've never realized this about 10/100 ethernet cable, that you only need 2 pairs. Or maybe I knew and I forgot, I'm used to wiring for gigabit now.
Theoretically, could you then take 1 CAT5 cable and create 2 jacks in the same room side by side? So 2 pairs on one keystone, 2 on another keystone? I have a situation where I have only one CAT5 outlet and would like to avoid running another cable there to make another. CAT5 would be an adequate speed in this scenario.
Why on earth would you want to do that? Yes, you can split the pairs and run two jacks at 10/100. But there will be two problems. One, you expose extra wire to accommodate the two jacks, which can cause data leaks. Two, it is 10/100

You’re better off getting a small 5 port gigabit switch for 20$
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Kasakato wrote: You could, but why not use a switch?
Yes obviously a switch would be easy. This is more hypothetical and to learn something. It would be cool if it could be done.
hobbes778 wrote: Something like these:
https://www.amazon.ca/Poyiccot-Splitter ... 07746RN5W/

Never used them, but was considering it one time.

I agree with above, a switch is a better option.
That looks interesting, but I don't think I'd purchase that. Would probably use a switch, yes.
Gee wrote: Why on earth would you want to do that? Yes, you can split the pairs and run two jacks at 10/100. But there will be two problems. One, you expose extra wire to accommodate the two jacks, which can cause data leaks. Two, it is 10/100

You’re better off getting a small 5 port gigabit switch for 20$
I'm pretty sure if done within reason, there won't be any noticeable data leaks by doing this with a regular 10/100 ethernet cable. What could it be, 6-8 inches exposed on each end at the most? 10/100 isn't that delicate.
Also as I said, 10/100 speed is useful in many scenarios. And if it's a 10/100 cable, a 5-port gigabit switch is overkill when I can spend about half that on an appropriate 10/100 switch.

The question wasn't an "I need to do this", more of a "Can it be done". Knowledge is power
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BernardRyder wrote: Yes obviously a switch would be easy. This is more hypothetical and to learn something. It would be cool if it could be done.



That looks interesting, but I don't think I'd purchase that. Would probably use a switch, yes.



I'm pretty sure if done within reason, there won't be any noticeable data leaks by doing this with a regular 10/100 ethernet cable. What could it be, 6-8 inches exposed on each end at the most? 10/100 isn't that delicate.
Also as I said, 10/100 speed is useful in many scenarios. And if it's a 10/100 cable, a 5-port gigabit switch is overkill when I can spend about half that on an appropriate 10/100 switch.

The question wasn't an "I need to do this", more of a "Can it be done". Knowledge is power
At one point Base10 plus a CAT3 phone connection was somewhat common too. I suppose making use of whats available never hurts, until you need those extra pairs.
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Kasakato wrote: At one point Base10 plus a CAT3 phone connection was somewhat common too. I suppose making use of whats available never hurts, until you need those extra pairs.
Good point. In my home our phone line is just CAT5 cable. We got rid of our landlines years ago. It would be nice to switch a few of them to ethernet since it is available. I can't see us ever going back, but it's not really a necessity to convert to ethernet. Not now at least.
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