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CBS All Access "Star Trek: Strange New Worlds" Pike Spock series ordered

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  • Jun 4th, 2020 10:30 pm
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Well this is exciting, especially if the series is less dark, and more optimistic.
No doubt, I would expect the adventures of Dwight Schrute in space to continue as well....
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Another prequel series? Well, I really hope the show runner learns from the mistakes from Discovery and goes retro with the technology. Despite Anthony Rapp and the writers insisting that Disco was in the Prime timeline, it felt totally off with its super-advanced tech.

Whoever is making this new series needs to watch TOS and stick with that as the design model. It doesn't have to feel as dated as the TOS does now, but I think something along the lines of what BSG did with its tech would work very nicely. The technology in that show was obviously upgraded from the 1978 series but still very recognizable as being inspired by the old show.
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PlainDealer wrote: Another prequel series? Well, I really hope the show runner learns from the mistakes from Discovery and goes retro with the technology.
This show is a spin off from Discovery so no reconceptualizing the aesthetics ... sorry
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jenviea wrote: This show is a spin off from Discovery so no reconceptualizing the aesthetics ... sorry
The goal of the series is to attract as many viewers as possible, and not just placate hardcore fans.
Continuity is a straight jacket.
(Good) Sci-Fi should always push the boundries from a storytelling perspective.

Discovery took various interesting risks with their approach - some were failures, both others were very good.
I felt they did an excellent job with how Enterprise was depicted in S2 of Discovery, and I would expect this to continue with this series.
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Bring in some old faces from Enterprise. We need some Andorians on the crew instead of strange aliens we have never seen before.
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Anson Mount mentioned right at the end that the show was going to Star Treks roots "hope and optimism" so lets hope it sticks with Gene Roddenburys original theme. I also hope this show gets better script writing and directing. Picard was alright but the script writing was lousy.
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brandonly wrote: Anson Mount mentioned right at the end that the show was going to Star Treks roots "hope and optimism" so lets hope it sticks with Gene Roddenburys original theme. I also hope this show gets better script writing and directing. Picard was alright but the script writing was lousy.
When Trek fans complain about lousy script writing and feel nostalgia for Gene's vision, I feel its very important to remind them that Gene Roddenberry was a terrible script writer (and, apparently, a terrible human being), and that much of Trek's success was due to the creative vision and efforts of other writers (prior and after death).

My Trek fandom started with Khan, which I experienced as a 7 year old.
The death of Spock impacted me tremendously - so very excited for Search For Spock.
Biggest childhood disappointment - when my family got a VCR, and watched Motion picture for first time.
That memory of dissatisfaction haunts me to this day, and I have not been able to watch it in its entirety since.
My childhood mind could not grasp how such a monstrosity was possible.

Never forget how badly Roddenberry infamously failed with the first movie, how he was turfed from the 2nd movie (where he selfishly leaked the death of Spock), and that it was Nicholas Meyer who deserves full credit for saving the franchise, not only by directing, but by writing the script in 12 days (for which he took zero pay and zero writing credit).

Great read here, from which I'll quote the concluding paragraphs:
https://www.nationalreview.com/2016/09/ ... stic-hack/
Roddenberry died in 1991. You could argue that the franchise he created has been more successful in the 25 years following his death than it had been in the 25 years before. In 2009, Star Trek was reincarnated on the big screen, this time under the direction of J. J. Abrams. Two sequels followed and another is in the works. Meanwhile Star Trek: Discovery is being prepped for CBS. So omnipresent has Star Trek become that longtime fans are complaining, as fans tend to do. A recent op-ed in the New York Times asked, “Who Stole My ‘Star Trek’?”

But Star Trek is not something you can steal. Star Trek is whoever is writing it at a given moment. Roddenberry, like many great innovators, fused two elements — Westerns and the aspirations of the New Frontier — to create something that in retrospect appears absolutely necessary and obvious. Star Trek: The Next Generation writer-producer Burton Armus, whose credits include NYPD Blue, says, “Look, Roddenberry can’t write very well. He came out with a concept that suddenly got hot, so he moved his house into this spaceship and he lived on it for the rest of his life.”

It was the brilliance of the idea, and the psychological need it satisfies in audiences, that allowed Roddenberry to get away with being, in most respects, an incredible, insufferable jerk to his family, friends, and peers. After reading The Fifty-Year Mission, I know why Gene Roddenberry stuck so fiercely to his notion of a future where human nature has been transformed into pure good. It’s because he knew more than anybody how truly awful we can be.
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"I’m not quite sure why Hollywood is stuck in an “infinite loop” of reboots and prequels for the last 20 years or so. It’s almost like they’re so afraid to fail, no one will pitch an idea not based on 60s, 70s or 80s nostalgia.

Star Trek is awesome, but let’s see new branches in the Star Trek universe, and let the iconic characters live on as they were originally cast and portrayed. I for one miss the original optimistic and idealistic portrayal of a bright future for mankind. These “dark and dirty” conflict and subterfuge ridden modern “Trek” romps are not the vision of Gene Roddenberry."
- via Engadget comments
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Fuelhandler wrote: "I’m not quite sure why Hollywood is stuck in an “infinite loop” of reboots and prequels for the last 20 years or so. It’s almost like they’re so afraid to fail, no one will pitch an idea not based on 60s, 70s or 80s nostalgia....
Direct reply also on Engadget
"Discovery is set 950 years in the future. So no longer a prequel and Picard is set 20 years after Insurrection. None of these are reboots."
Fuelhandler wrote: Star Trek is awesome, but let’s see new branches in the Star Trek universe,...
Direct reply also on Engadget
"So you say you want change, but really you just want 1000 versions of TOS."

Instead of cut and pasting some random and anonymous comment from a different board, show us some of the originality "true" Trek fans like Fuelhandler claim they crave by writing your own (or same) complaints but in your own words

Variety has a fresh article with some comments from Akiva Goldsman and Ethan Peck

https://variety.com/2020/tv/news/star-t ... 234608181/
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PlainDealer wrote: Another prequel series? Well, I really hope the show runner learns from the mistakes from Discovery and goes retro with the technology. Despite Anthony Rapp and the writers insisting that Disco was in the Prime timeline, it felt totally off with its super-advanced tech.

Whoever is making this new series needs to watch TOS and stick with that as the design model. It doesn't have to feel as dated as the TOS does now, but I think something along the lines of what BSG did with its tech would work very nicely. The technology in that show was obviously upgraded from the 1978 series but still very recognizable as being inspired by the old show.
I disagree. The original ST was in the 60s and what was what the future looked like in the 60s. The entire bridge looks like it has lower tech than our current society. I think there is wiggle room in the interpretation to adjust for the fact it was filmed in the 60s. The only real gripe I had with discovery was the spore drive. I guess you can story that away. The rest of the tech seemed fine.

I'm really stoked about this sequel. Aside from the early start of Discovery I thought it was pretty good. I'm really looking forward to this captain pike series.
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zod wrote: I disagree. The original ST was in the 60s and what was what the future looked like in the 60s. The entire bridge looks like it has lower tech than our current society. I think there is wiggle room in the interpretation to adjust for the fact it was filmed in the 60s. The only real gripe I had with discovery was the spore drive. I guess you can story that away. The rest of the tech seemed fine.
I'm aware that a lot of Discovery fans are able to tilt their heads enough to accept that its bright and shiny toys are pre-TOS tech, and to that, I say to each his own.

I cited BSG as a great example of a show that understands what retro means--corded telephone-like comm, the use of physical paper for reports and books, analogue controls, etc. In other words, if you want to exercise discipline and pull back on the tech, you totally can. In the case of Star Trek, you just have to have a measure of self control, keep in mind what the TOS series and feature films looked like, and not go nuts with all the cutting edge effects the way Disco did.

If the show runners had set Discovery in after Voyager or in a timeline other than Prime where technological development occurred at a faster rate, then sure, by all means go gaga with the CGI and super advanced tech. By insisting that Disco in its existing form is a Prime-set prequel to TOS is just insulting.

And this is just the designs we're talking about. You've already mentioned the Spore Drive, so I won't flog that particular horse. But other things, such as the Disco crew figuring out how to detect cloaked Birds of Prey--what happened to that tech? Did someone just forget to pass that along, leaving Starfleet at a huge disadvantage in their encounters with the Klingons and Romulans during TOS? Sorry, but there's just no way Disco syncs up with TOS as a prequel. I choose to treat it as non-Prime Trek, and anyone else is free to view it in whatever manner they choose.

I have no doubt that Strange New Worlds is going to hold nothing back when it comes to upping the ante in the tech arms race. It'll just be another alternate timeline show for me.
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PlainDealer wrote: I'm aware that a lot of Discovery fans are able to tilt their heads enough to accept that its bright and shiny toys are pre-TOS tech, and to that, I say to each his own.

I cited BSG as a great example of a show that understands what retro means--corded telephone-like comm, the use of physical paper for reports and books, analogue controls, etc. In other words, if you want to exercise discipline and pull back on the tech, you totally can. In the case of Star Trek, you just have to have a measure of self control, keep in mind what the TOS series and feature films looked like, and not go nuts with all the cutting edge effects the way Disco did.

If the show runners had set Discovery in after Voyager or in a timeline other than Prime where technological development occurred at a faster rate, then sure, by all means go gaga with the CGI and super advanced tech. By insisting that Disco in its existing form is a Prime-set prequel to TOS is just insulting.

And this is just the designs we're talking about. You've already mentioned the Spore Drive, so I won't flog that particular horse. But other things, such as the Disco crew figuring out how to detect cloaked Birds of Prey--what happened to that tech? Did someone just forget to pass that along, leaving Starfleet at a huge disadvantage in their encounters with the Klingons and Romulans during TOS? Sorry, but there's just no way Disco syncs up with TOS as a prequel. I choose to treat it as non-Prime Trek, and anyone else is free to view it in whatever manner they choose.

I have no doubt that Strange New Worlds is going to hold nothing back when it comes to upping the ante in the tech arms race. It'll just be another alternate timeline show for me.
The retro designs in BSG were a plot device as the Cylons could only affect the newer ships and tech. But it was a good plot device for once...
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DougO wrote: The retro designs in BSG were a plot device as the Cylons could only affect the newer ships and tech. But it was a good plot device for once...
Which I also find applies to our modern culture. With everything being hackable, and the Battlestar surviving because it wasn't networked, I can't believe we don't have more offline solutions in the 21st century to prevent things from being hackable via the internet.
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DougO wrote: The retro designs in BSG were a plot device as the Cylons could only affect the newer ships and tech. But it was a good plot device for once...
True, the unnetworked Battlestar and Vipers were a plot a device. But the fact that workplace fashions (e.g., Roslin, Billy, the Quorum) are identifiable to 21st century audiences, that the crew uses mirrors in shapes familiar to us, that their stationery is what you can find at Staples, etc. are all conscious choices by the production designers that have nothing to do with hackability. These are all aesthetics that help us connect to the characters by making them similar to us. By keeping the snazzy effects and futuristic toys out of the way, they allow the audience to focus on the drama.

But getting back to the original point, I'm very happy to report that my ballpoint pen and shirt and tie haven't been hacked yet.
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