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Ceramic Window Tint - For Home

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[OP]
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Jul 1, 2016
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Toronto

Ceramic Window Tint - For Home

Hello fellow RFDers,

A colleague recently got ceramic window tint done on his car and WOW what a difference in heat reduction...
it was only a 5% ceramic tint on a Nissan Hatchback (all 4 windows, corners and backside).
I've noticed no difference in light reduction; but the heat disappears when the windows are rolled up; very unexpected.

I've been thinking how much difference this will make in homes. From some research I've done on the internet; this seems like a great long-term passive solution to reducing in-coming heat in the summer; and reduce heat loss in the winter.
Whats the point of having windows if they're ALWAYS coved by curtains?

I still need to measure my windows to get an idea how much I'll need. Though it'll be quite a bit as I'm looking to cover most, if not all of my windows.

Not looking for anything super high end; though I'd prefer to stick to known brands - Ceramic/Carbon window tint.
If anyone has any information on where to buy in the GTA, please share here :)
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Last edited by ProjectPixelation on Aug 17th, 2020 9:43 am, edited 1 time in total.
Pixelation~
29 replies
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2013
5270 posts
3500 upvotes
ProjectPixelation wrote: Hello fellow RFDers,

A colleague recently got ceramic window tint done on his car and WOW what a difference in heat reduction...
it was only a 5% ceramic tint on a Nissan Hatchback (all 4 windows, corners and backside).
I've noticed no difference in light reduction; but the heat disappears when the windows are rolled up; very unexpected.

I've been thinking how much difference this will make in homes. From some research I've done on the internet; this seems like a great long-term passive solution to reducing in-coming heat in the summer; and reduce heat loss in the winter.
Whats the point of having windows if they're ALWAYS coved by curtains?

I still need to measure my windows to get an idea how much I'll need. Though it'll be quite a bit as I'm looking to cover most, if not all of my windows.

Not looking for anything super high end; though I'd prefer to stick to known brands - Ceramic/Carbon window tint.
If anyone has any information on where to buy in the GTA, please share here :)
to answer your question in bold : because curtains is an easy way to have the sunlight in during sunny winter days, and prevent sun heat during hot summer days.

First, financially speaking, I really doubt that it worth it. The saving you'll made will not be covered before many years IMHO. And, if you say that it will prevent heat loss during winter, it will also prevent heat from sun coming in... especially from windows facing south
Deal Guru
Feb 9, 2006
11640 posts
6197 upvotes
Brampton
if you want to DIY
Gila Titanium Heat Rejection Film.

It's something like 50% VLR. So it'll be darker but not stupid dark like Car tint films which would make your house look like a Brothel or Tug.

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/gila-4 ... 1000696001

I did it on my Sliding doors, they're they only fenestration that do not have any kind of ecoating.
[OP]
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Jul 1, 2016
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DoorCrasher wrote: to answer your question in bold : because curtains is an easy way to have the sunlight in during sunny winter days, and prevent sun heat during hot summer days.

First, financially speaking, I really doubt that it worth it. The saving you'll made will not be covered before many years IMHO. And, if you say that it will prevent heat loss during winter, it will also prevent heat from sun coming in... especially from windows facing south
I just uploaded screenshots with objective data; #number sunlight hours on average by month for major cities (Toronto included obviously) and the data sheet for one of the clear window films from 3M.

With a whopping 50-60% passive IR heat reduction in summers; this is definitely something home owners with many south facing windows should at least look at.
Not to mention the 6-8% heat loss reduction in Winter; keep in mind this is all hours of the day 24/7 vs the 2-3, maybe 4 hours of sun you get when most people are at work 5 days of the week anyways. As a Canadian; let's be honest that the majority of our winters is pretty miserable (due to lack of sunlight on most days - the data doesn't lie).

Obviously this comes down to cost; but the convenience and practicality can't be ignored.
Pixelation~
Deal Fanatic
Nov 21, 2013
5270 posts
3500 upvotes
ProjectPixelation wrote: I just uploaded some screenshots with objective data; #number sunlight hours on average by month for major cities (Toronto included obviously) and the data sheet for one of the clear window films from 3M.

With a whopping 50-60% passive IR heat reduction in summers; this is definitely something home owners with many south facing windows should at least look at.
Not to mention the 6-8% heat loss reduction in Winter; keep in mind this is all hours of the day 24/7 vs the 2-3, maybe 4 hours of sun you get when most people are at work anyways.

Obviously this comes down to cost; but the convenience and practicality can't be ignored.
well,it looks like you have made your idea. Go for it, and come for an update with objective feedback ;) Here, I rely om my Low-E windows, and blinds / curtains
Deal Guru
Feb 9, 2006
11640 posts
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Brampton
If you DIY the payback on the film will be quick (One or 2 summers especially if they've been like our last two summers in the GTA and with our electricity prices).

The best option would be the 50% / 60% IR rejection film by 3M on the outside.

Even the cheaper stuff like the Gila Titanium would make a huge difference and the pay off would be very quick due to the low cost.
Deal Expert
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Feb 11, 2007
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Oakville
It's not cost savings but also comfort improvement, especially if your AC struggles to keep temps down.
[OP]
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Jul 1, 2016
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Toronto
engineered wrote: It's not cost savings but also comfort improvement, especially if your AC struggles to keep temps down.
That's what I was thinking too; reduced wear & tear on your furnace/AC - it's difficult to quantify these costs in numbers but definitely there on top of utility savings!
Pixelation~
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
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Paris
Some of the tints will mess up your double window seals so you are forward 1 step and back 1 step.
[OP]
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Jerico wrote: Some of the tints will mess up your double window seals so you are forward 1 step and back 1 step.
Please elaborate with more details/info.
Pixelation~
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
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Paris
ProjectPixelation wrote: Please elaborate with more details/info.
Some of the window tints, when applied to the inside of your windows were they are generally applied, will build up heat in your double glazed window spacers and prematurely break the seals so you lose insulation in your windows and they fog up.
[OP]
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Jul 1, 2016
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Toronto
Jerico wrote: Some of the window tints, when applied to the inside of your windows were they are generally applied, will build up heat in your double glazed window spacers and prematurely break the seals so you lose insulation in your windows and they fog up.
Yeah, I've read about that in my research.
Comes down to:
1) The PSI tolerance and specs from the window manufacturer.
2) The incoming IR heat from the sun in your geographical area
3) The heat absorbance of the film and the amount of PSI it can generate

https://www.conveniencegroup.com/myths- ... indow-film

These are all factors to take into consideration. The reality is that seals will eventually break down.
Objectively speaking, is it more cost effective to:

1) Replace the window panels every 5-10 years
vs
1) Reapply seal to the window - interior/exterior with caulk, silicone (You can't restore the vaccum).
2) Apply Thermal-control window films
Pixelation~
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May 23, 2009
2616 posts
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Mississauga
I think you are mixing the advantages of Low-e glass vs argon gas. Both work together for ideal comfort in our climate so if you are reading articles from Texas or Florida then you are consuming incorrect information for SW Ontatio.

Your ceramic tint it equivalent to Low-e glass(Low-E 180, Low-E 272 and Low-E 366). It reflects/rejects ultraviolet rays to keep your home cooler in summer months. A window built with maximum Low-e properties will basically do a good job rejecting heat in the summer but suck in the winter when the sun can provide some indirect heating.

Argon gas more warranted for cooler climates and is put between the glass panes to create a thermal barrier in the winter months. It slows the heat transfer and basically keeps the heat inside. No thermal barrier would mean your interior window glass will be closer to the outdoor temperature and leave you with condensation on your windows.

With your ceramic window tint on the interior glass and blown window seals you'll end up with a more cooler house in the summer; but in the winter your furnace will end up working harder and the poorly insulated windows with broken seals will still leave the room feeling uncomfortable.

There are more expensive films that can be used on the exterior of the window and then that cuts on the deal of reasonable priced home window tint.
Sr. Member
Jan 7, 2013
604 posts
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Oshawa, Ontario
tebore wrote: if you want to DIY
Gila Titanium Heat Rejection Film.

It's something like 50% VLR. So it'll be darker but not stupid dark like Car tint films which would make your house look like a Brothel or Tug.

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/gila-4 ... 1000696001

I did it on my Sliding doors, they're they only fenestration that do not have any kind of ecoating.
How durable is the film? I'd like to try on my patio door but sorry it would tear
Deal Guru
Feb 9, 2006
11640 posts
6197 upvotes
Brampton
Shaidin wrote: How durable is the film? I'd like to try on my patio door but sorry it would tear
It's like any other tint. Anything sharp dragged across it will damage it.

I had it over 18 months. It's still perfect. People post online here and there around year 5 or so it starts to lose clarity in places like Arizona as the IR and UV coatings breakdown but I'll have to wait and see. There's no follow up videos online I could find.

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