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Chernobyl HBO miniseries based on real events. 9.7/10 IMDB

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  • Jun 29th, 2019 1:38 pm
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Chernobyl HBO miniseries based on real events. 9.7/10 IMDB

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7366338/
In April 1986, an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics becomes one of the world's worst man-made catastrophes.


PS. My dad was there after the explosion. Many were commanded to go.
Last edited by ukrainiandude on May 27th, 2019 3:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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59 replies
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Is this on Crave?
All day I dream about sports
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Jun 16, 2009
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Great series so far. Lots of star talent to carry the story that I knew only the basics of. I love how Communist this looks and feels.
c'mon get happy! :cheesygri
Deal Guru
Mar 22, 2004
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RFD
The about of walking when one should be running annoyed the heck out of me first episode so far...

And the main guy in charge is so incompetent
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It seems they did not know how fatal is radiation at that time since they don't have protective gear and just running towards the reactor to check it.
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Incredible series so far. Highly recommend. Looks like another HBO hit.
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Damn, I didn't realize that this had already started!
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scoper wrote:
May 15th, 2019 8:41 am
looks like you need to be on their $25 plan to watch this.
$19.98
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boldventure wrote:
May 15th, 2019 9:28 am
It seems they did not know how fatal is radiation at that time since they don't have protective gear and just running towards the reactor to check it.
No, they were in denial there was any danger. 'How could the roof of the reactor explode its not possible stop fearmongering' was the logic. I loved the scene where the engineer was telling them there was graphite on the ground and the head engineer was screaming at him no there isn't.
c'mon get happy! :cheesygri
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boldventure wrote:
May 15th, 2019 9:28 am
It seems they did not know how fatal is radiation at that time since they don't have protective gear and just running towards the reactor to check it.
If you're talking about the Soviet state as a whole and the knowledge of their technical experts, then of course they knew. But just like all things, experts know technical matters and plebeians don't.

Some of the primary cleanup crew who worked in the Soviet nuclear industry knew and accepted the cleanup effort was a likely death sentence for those who worked there. Some went back out to assist in the clean up effort knowing full well they were already overexposed to radiation. The firefighters and army they enlisted to clean up the site probably didn't understand all the details, other than what they are told on the job, but the main cleanup crew sure did. Most of these men were essentially 'sacrificed' for the greater good in containing the disaster.

Health implications of radiation is well known at the time. The Soviets couldn't build a working nuclear reactor without understanding the science behind it. Not only did the Soviets have working civilian nuclear reactors but they had nuclear weapons. They are not short on experts in the field. As far as the Chernobyl disaster is concerned, they had enough foresight to send crew in to wash buildings and the streets, clean up top soil, order an evacuation of the area, clean up exposed fuel rods on the roof of the power plant, send in unmanned robots to help with the clean up (all robots died) and put in a sarcophagus around the reactor structure. The experts fully understood the implications of the situation they were in and were desperately acting to mitigate problems based on that understanding.

Where they failed was in engineering things with a focus on safety. They had no containment structure around the reactor and designed a reactor with a large positive 'void coefficient', which is inherently unstable in certain conditions (Western reactors are generally designed with containment structures and negative void coefficient). They didn't have adequate PPE for the cleanup crew. This points to a culture that lacks focus on safety, rather than one that lacks understanding of science.

You couldn't even say the Soviets didn't understand the dangers of their planned test that caused the meltdown to occur. Their reactors had alarms go off, and the crew at Chernobyl manually shut them off together with manual overrides to the control rods in order to retract them further than allowed by the system. The original designers of the reactor likely knew full well the reactor will be unstable under certain configurations, but it was the bureaucrats that day who pushed for the test by overriding the safety protocols designed in place that didn't. Again, you have people who understand and people who didn't. Note that the same graphite reactor design from that Chernobyl disaster is still in use today and have not seen another disaster since, indicating if you don't mess with the safety protocols and operate the reactor as designed, it doesn't just meltdown on it's own.
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RFD
BernardRyder wrote:
May 15th, 2019 7:16 pm
No, they were in denial there was any danger. 'How could the roof of the reactor explode its not possible stop fearmongering' was the logic. I loved the scene where the engineer was telling them there was graphite on the ground and the head engineer was screaming at him no there isn't.
Spot on that idiot in charge was in pure denial. Lots of people were in denial and wanted to save their bums instead of doing to best to get to the bottom of what was going on. They'd rather pass on the mess to someone else.
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SWEET! Saw the trailer for this a while ago and thought it looked great.

Didn't know it had started already, gonna watch some tonight.

For shows like this on CRAVE, Are all episodes released right from the start, or do they release one weekly?
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fattyburger11 wrote:
May 15th, 2019 9:41 pm
If you're talking about the Soviet state as a whole and the knowledge of their technical experts, then of course they knew. But just like all things, experts know technical matters and plebeians don't.

Some of the primary cleanup crew who worked in the Soviet nuclear industry knew and accepted the cleanup effort was a likely death sentence for those who worked there. Some went back out to assist in the clean up effort knowing full well they were already overexposed to radiation. The firefighters and army they enlisted to clean up the site probably didn't understand all the details, other than what they are told on the job, but the main cleanup crew sure did. Most of these men were essentially 'sacrificed' for the greater good in containing the disaster.

Health implications of radiation is well known at the time. The Soviets couldn't build a working nuclear reactor without understanding the science behind it. Not only did the Soviets have working civilian nuclear reactors but they had nuclear weapons. They are not short on experts in the field. As far as the Chernobyl disaster is concerned, they had enough foresight to send crew in to wash buildings and the streets, clean up top soil, order an evacuation of the area, clean up exposed fuel rods on the roof of the power plant, send in unmanned robots to help with the clean up (all robots died) and put in a sarcophagus around the reactor structure. The experts fully understood the implications of the situation they were in and were desperately acting to mitigate problems based on that understanding.

Where they failed was in engineering things with a focus on safety. They had no containment structure around the reactor and designed a reactor with a large positive 'void coefficient', which is inherently unstable in certain conditions (Western reactors are generally designed with containment structures and negative void coefficient). They didn't have adequate PPE for the cleanup crew. This points to a culture that lacks focus on safety, rather than one that lacks understanding of science.

You couldn't even say the Soviets didn't understand the dangers of their planned test that caused the meltdown to occur. Their reactors had alarms go off, and the crew at Chernobyl manually shut them off together with manual overrides to the control rods in order to retract them further than allowed by the system. The original designers of the reactor likely knew full well the reactor will be unstable under certain configurations, but it was the bureaucrats that day who pushed for the test by overriding the safety protocols designed in place that didn't. Again, you have people who understand and people who didn't. Note that the same graphite reactor design from that Chernobyl disaster is still in use today and have not seen another disaster since, indicating if you don't mess with the safety protocols and operate the reactor as designed, it doesn't just meltdown on it's own.
I am just referring to those crews and their supervisor and not the experts

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