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Choosing school for engineering

[OP]
Newbie
Jul 14, 2015
6 posts
2 upvotes

Choosing school for engineering

Hi, All,
I am graduated from NAIT with electrical engineering tech diploma and thinking to get a degree after working 1 year now?
Do you guys have some good advice?
So far I have heard about lakehead and for another 2 years, But other good eng school like u of a, UBC, uoft need 4 years and i am not even sure if would be able to get an admission.

Welcome any advice and suggestion.
Thanks
22 replies
Deal Fanatic
Dec 6, 2006
5608 posts
1809 upvotes
Toronto
No need to wonder about admission. Just apply. What's the worst that can happen?

But applying as "mature" student is usually easier, especially when you have previous post-secondary education.
Newbie
Jan 27, 2012
44 posts
2 upvotes
MISSISSAUGA
boyohboy wrote: No need to wonder about admission. Just apply. What's the worst that can happen?

But applying as "mature" student is usually easier, especially when you have previous post-secondary education.
Agreed with Boyohboy. Just apply and you never know. And why go for Lakehead if you can get into better universities. If the engineering degree is truly what you are after for, don't worry about extra 2 years since it will pay off for the rest of your life. Honestly speaking though, Lakehead is a low tier school. Imagine people from UofC or UofA still got laid off in Calgary/Edmonton due to the oil market, what are the chances for Lakehead?
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Nov 12, 2013
927 posts
208 upvotes
Iceland
DrXenon wrote: ^ Nobody cares where you went to school. Get out of school as fast as you can and get work experience. We have several engineering managers who upgraded tech diplomas at Lakehead, all making $100k+ now.
+1 Very few people will care where you go your degree, and if they do its likely because they're an alumni.
"Between my salary and the office supplies I pilfer, I'm making 6 figures."
Medicine1T4 wrote: oh that's just a username............... im in grade 12
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 8, 2007
5400 posts
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People care.

Middle managers may not care. But people care.

As the other guy said - Apply to them all. Nothing to bruise but your ego (oh no!). Someone will accept you and at that point who cares - you're in.
Hydropwnics wrote:"TodayHello is a certified hustler and original gangster."
Member
Aug 12, 2009
319 posts
63 upvotes
UAlberta grad here haha (although not engineering). Go for lakehead as a last resort, try to get into a top tier school first.

Out of curiosity, what do you do for a career as of currently? Do you work in a utility company?
Jr. Member
Jul 15, 2009
161 posts
66 upvotes
Edmonton
OP graduated from NAIT. In Edmonton (Alberta in general), people don't really care which university you graduated. People only care if you have good references and if you can do a good job. If you must choose a school (canadian university), people here have a lot of respect for University of Alberta and Toronto's engineering programs.
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Feb 2, 2014
1426 posts
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The 6
Should you want to live in Toronto once you settle down, only go in for engineering if you want to be unemployed. The exception is civil and environmental.
Deal Addict
Mar 18, 2015
3140 posts
3010 upvotes
Antarctica
DrunkenStupor wrote: Should you want to live in Toronto once you settle down, only go in for engineering if you want to be unemployed. The exception is civil and environmental.
Or move to US. One of my family friends was unable to find a job here but applied to companies in US and got an offer from 3 of them. He works at national instruments in Texas and is happy staying there (electrical engineer).

Don't kill your passion just for the sake of living in a familiar place forever. Go where you can get hired instead.
[OP]
Newbie
Jul 14, 2015
6 posts
2 upvotes
Field service
crazi wrote: UAlberta grad here haha (although not engineering). Go for lakehead as a last resort, try to get into a top tier school first.

Out of curiosity, what do you do for a career as of currently? Do you work in a utility company?
[OP]
Newbie
Jul 14, 2015
6 posts
2 upvotes
Where should electrical engineer go then? Dont U of T have a good reputation in other places as well?
Thx
DrunkenStupor wrote: Should you want to live in Toronto once you settle down, only go in for engineering if you want to be unemployed. The exception is civil and environmental.
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Nov 12, 2013
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Iceland
Respectfly wrote: Where should electrical engineer go then? Dont U of T have a good reputation in other places as well?
Thx
UofT is fine. So is Ryerson. So is Lakehead.

What will matter afterwards is how good you are at communicating and getting along with people, and obviously doing a good job.

Sure UofT may be seen as marginally better in terms of helping you land your first job, but it won't be much. It'll come down to you for the most part.
"Between my salary and the office supplies I pilfer, I'm making 6 figures."
Medicine1T4 wrote: oh that's just a username............... im in grade 12
Sr. Member
Feb 10, 2015
607 posts
228 upvotes
Respectfly wrote: Hi, All,
I am graduated from NAIT with electrical engineering tech diploma and thinking to get a degree after working 1 year now?
Do you guys have some good advice?
So far I have heard about lakehead and for another 2 years, But other good eng school like u of a, UBC, uoft need 4 years and i am not even sure if would be able to get an admission.

Welcome any advice and suggestion.
Thanks
Camosun college in Victoria has a 6 month bridge program that transitions to either UVic or Lakehead.
Newbie
Jul 13, 2015
46 posts
22 upvotes
Montreal, Quebec
I would suggest that you go somewhere that has a reliable co-op program with high/100% placement rates that you can get into. Even if it takes you 5 years to finish the program instead of 2, you'll make a decent amount of money during the co-op period, and will be infinitely more employable because of your experience, and you'll have connections in all of the places you've worked. That is easily worth the extra 3 years.

I work in aerospace, and we often hire students with mediocre grades from Concordia (a very average but probably underrated school) over much better schools because of all of the co-op placements they have with Montreal aerospace companies. Experience and connections are more important than school.
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Mar 24, 2004
8683 posts
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Lakehead program looks good cos it's accredited and only 2 years plus a bridging program. There's also Mohawk/McMaster B.Tech degree completion program which can be done part time. It's not fully accredited but depending on the stream you might only need to write 4 of the technical exams.

Portfolio/experience means far more than branding. Make industry connections early and often, work on as many projects as you can, you'll do awesome.

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