Automotive

Is Cold Air Intake in Winter a bad idea ?

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  • Oct 11th, 2016 10:14 pm
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[OP]
Newbie
Oct 24, 2011
1 posts
Windsor, Ontario

Is Cold Air Intake in Winter a bad idea ?

Hello All,

Can anyone suggest me if cold air intake is a bad idea in winter..?

Thanks
Siva
25 replies
Newbie
Sep 3, 2010
40 posts
3 upvotes
Oshawa
siva2985 wrote: Hello All,

Can anyone suggest me if cold air intake is a bad idea in winter..?

Thanks
Siva

What do you drive? What kind of CAI do you have?
I don't think it will be a problem. Just give a good clean up and oil it in the spring.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 8, 2005
1732 posts
242 upvotes
BC
Guiceman wrote: What do you drive? What kind of CAI do you have?
I don't think it will be a problem. Just give a good clean up and oil it in the spring.

depending on
-type of CAI
-ride height
- car..

only concern is, depending on where is the CAI is located.. water may be sucked from the CAI locking your engine.. usually happens when there is lots of rain and slushy snow. for cai are usually vent out to the lower bumpers.
Deal Expert
Feb 29, 2008
29006 posts
4698 upvotes
Montreal
CAI let in air that's barely any colder than normal, and the performance gains are usually minimal. Your engine won't freeze to death. Go ahead and knock yourself out.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Dec 2, 2008
12427 posts
2145 upvotes
GTA
cold air intake could make you lose power in low end. high end gains should be normal due to the restrictive flow of stock intakes.
Sr. Member
Jun 21, 2006
856 posts
474 upvotes
Save your money
depending on what can you have, you could run in to idling issues and so on and so on
i would rather spend that money on maintance such as tires, brakes, fluids ...
Deal Fanatic
Dec 3, 2007
5925 posts
1041 upvotes
Calgary
Unless you have other mods, your gain will be minimal and your lost will be noticeable. So why?
Deal Guru
Feb 9, 2006
12750 posts
7413 upvotes
Brampton
Generally it's a bad idea. Not because of damage or anything but just for Fuel economy.

Depending on the CAI design you'll be feeding in air that's too cold. This is especially true in the morning and you're "warming up" your engine is going to stay in open loop longer. This is one of the things that car companies design for. The ability to have faster warm up at -30 and still deliver cooler air in 30.

The other issue is your cone can get soaked and freeze, yes it does happen there's a lot of vapor in the winter months when you're driving on a highway it'll flash freeze on contact with surfaces. Look at how often your windshield gets a thin layer of ice on it when the wipers aren't moving.

What I do is CAI comes off when winters go on. Use a highflow filter with the stock box for winter. CAI and summers go back on in the warmer months.
Deal Addict
Apr 14, 2007
2922 posts
412 upvotes
Montreal
You could always change your CAI for a short ram intake which I have from Corksport. It's up near the engine so it's not low like a CAI. Imagine a CAI in Edmonton winters I don't know if it would be possible to start a car with a CAI there.
Jr. Member
Mar 4, 2006
135 posts
11 upvotes
Vancouver
I've run a CAI for several years in winter and have had no issues. The filter itself was about a foot off the ground. Rain and snow are not issues, but deep puddles definitely are so avoid them at all costs.

In the rare occasion that you go through a deep puddle, the best thing to do is let off the throttle, and coast through it so that your throttle body isn't open to take in water. It's trouble though if the puddle is so big that you can't coast through it.
Member
Jun 6, 2009
285 posts
6 upvotes
Vancouver
depends on your vehicle, gm runs CAI's on their vehicles from factory.
Deal Guru
Feb 9, 2006
12750 posts
7413 upvotes
Brampton
Kami19 wrote: depends on your vehicle, gm runs CAI's on their vehicles from factory.

Enlighten me... Which ones?
Member
Jun 6, 2009
285 posts
6 upvotes
Vancouver
tebore wrote: Enlighten me... Which ones?

camros run ram air
canyons/colorados run cold air(have a resonator box to quiet them down a bit)
sierras/silvys
Deal Guru
Feb 9, 2006
12750 posts
7413 upvotes
Brampton
Kami19 wrote: camros run ram air
canyons/colorados run cold air(have a resonator box to quiet them down a bit)
sierras/silvys
Sure...

They're not exactly CAI's in the aftermarket sense. They don't have smooth tubing, they have resonators and various chambers to help divert moisture and less than optimal mounting locations. The intake length is designed to help increase low end torque without sacrficing top end HP etc...

But it drives home the point that most OEM intakes aren't as bad as people think. They are a compromise for durability and drivablity. Most of the time they are even designed to ensure a consistant air temperature that helps in +40 degree grid lock conditions and ensure start up in -40 Alberta winters.
Member
Jun 6, 2009
285 posts
6 upvotes
Vancouver
tebore wrote: Sure...

They're not exactly CAI's in the aftermarket sense. They don't have smooth tubing, they have resonators and various chambers to help divert moisture and less than optimal mounting locations. The intake length is designed to help increase low end torque without sacrficing top end HP etc...

But it drives home the point that most OEM intakes aren't as bad as people think. They are a compromise for durability and drivablity. Most of the time they are even designed to ensure a consistant air temperature that helps in +40 degree grid lock conditions and ensure start up in -40 Alberta winters.

your right, and thanks i was expecting an argument, but i would do some research and make sure a cai is actually a cai, because on my truck a k&N cai just ends up getting hotter air because it is more open to underhood temps. so inessence it ends being a hot air intake.
Banned
User avatar
Feb 15, 2008
26318 posts
3231 upvotes
Calgary
Its usually not a good idea to tinker with the intakes on cars. For instance, on some cars, hot coolant has to be pumped around the intake components/throttle body to facilitate deicing/anti-icing of the intake in certain winter conditions. Otherwise, the engine could suffer either foreign object damage when accumulated ice is liberated from intake components, *or* throttle components could be frozen in an undesirable position as the result of ice buildup. The intake system and throttle body heating is designed to minimize the chances of this happening.


Theoretically, if your modified car had an uncommanded acceleration and got into a winter accident in conditions that might cause intake icing -- you could be held liable, and I highly doubt insurance would pay a claim caused by a car that did not conform to the manufacturers' specifications. Best not to tinker with what the smart engineers designed for your car, both in terms of safety and optimal fuel consumption characteristics. Funky intakes might be good for the track, but keep that stuff off the streets please.
TodayHello wrote: ...The Banks are smarter than you - they have floors full of people whose job it is to read Mark77 posts...
Deal Guru
User avatar
Jul 12, 2003
12332 posts
4843 upvotes
Toronto
Been driving with a CAI in my car for 3 years, never have a problem. There is a plastic that protect it from sucking up water in it on my Mazdaspeed CAI.

Intake is mostly for the better sound when rev and driving, but it gives a bit of power difference on high rev on Turbo cars.
Retired Forum Moderator February 2009 - June 2015
Newbie
Oct 8, 2016
1 posts
If you're driving a turbo car, get one. Make sure you get a tune before you start your vehicle though. The MAF sensor is usually set to whatever the stock intake was, -and it could lead to running catastrophically lean.

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