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Commercial Freezer Settings (23 cu ft) - Help Please!

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[OP]
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Oct 14, 2004
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Toronto

Commercial Freezer Settings (23 cu ft) - Help Please!

Not sure if this is the right place, but we recently purchased the Eurodib 23 cu ft Commercial Freezer from Costco (similar to https://www.costco.ca/eurodib-19-cu.-ft ... 86464.html).

It has the Dixell xr60cx controller, but ice cream is coming out very soft even when we have it set to range between -14 & -17C. When it arrived, it seemed to go into a 6hr thaw everyday which certainly didn't help keep stuff frozen. It also seems to be using ~125KW of energy a month...not sure if that is good or not. The room it is in gets a bit warmer (up to maybe 28C), but we really don't have anywhere else we can put it.

Does anyone have experience configuring these for optimal settings?
6 replies
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
32607 posts
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East Gwillimbury
If it is real ice cream it should be soft.

I have a different freezer and I have my temperature set to -14º and everything is frozen. The ice cream is soft as it should be
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2001
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Out of curiosity why did you choose a commercial freezer? It's not a knock, I am just curious why you would opt for a more expensive freezer and whether it's simply better construction or more to it.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1438 posts
409 upvotes
Toronto
Gee wrote: If it is real ice cream it should be soft.

I have a different freezer and I have my temperature set to -14º and everything is frozen. The ice cream is soft as it should be
I also have it place right under the fan on the top shelf - so maybe I should move it down a shelf. Everything else in the freezer seems frozen...



TrevorK wrote: Out of curiosity why did you choose a commercial freezer? It's not a knock, I am just curious why you would opt for a more expensive freezer and whether it's simply better construction or more to it.
A few reasons really - it is in a storage area, so we thought having stainless steel would be a good idea for easy cleaning. At the time we bought it (about 1.5mths ago), Costco only had a tiny front load (4.5 cu ft), or commercial freezers. We really didn't want a chest freezer as stuff can easily get lost in it. I thought it may also have stronger shelves - the consumer grade ones didn't look like you could throw 5 bags of milk on them without issues.

I will say - it has been nice to have - we can buy big boxes of various foods at the Costco Business Center and the whole box just goes straight into the freezer (I am looking at you baguettes and $20 box of onion rings).
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Aug 2, 2001
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James_TheVirus wrote: A few reasons really - it is in a storage area, so we thought having stainless steel would be a good idea for easy cleaning. At the time we bought it (about 1.5mths ago), Costco only had a tiny front load (4.5 cu ft), or commercial freezers. We really didn't want a chest freezer as stuff can easily get lost in it. I thought it may also have stronger shelves - the consumer grade ones didn't look like you could throw 5 bags of milk on them without issues.

I will say - it has been nice to have - we can buy big boxes of various foods at the Costco Business Center and the whole box just goes straight into the freezer (I am looking at you baguettes and $20 box of onion rings).
Thanks!

We have a 40+ year old chest freezer that I am casually looking to replace since I assume it's a giant power suck, and some of the things like the seals on the lid have been twisted a bit (it's second hand and came with my house). A freezer is important to us because we buy in bulk, so I have been intrigued with the thought of a commercial freezer because I simply assumed it would be bigger and better quality.
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Mar 4, 2007
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Vancouver
Hi,

Ideal storage temperature for ice cream is -18°C or lower.
https://www.idfa.org/tips-on-storing-ha ... %20freezer.
Have you bothered to put a thermometer in the freezer to see how cold it actually is? Does your freeze have tech support? Have you called them? The big knock against upright freezers is that whenever the door is opened, all the cold air rushes out.
[OP]
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Oct 14, 2004
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Toronto
Fraser River Rat wrote: Hi,

Ideal storage temperature for ice cream is -18°C or lower.
https://www.idfa.org/tips-on-storing-ha ... %20freezer.
Have you bothered to put a thermometer in the freezer to see how cold it actually is? Does your freeze have tech support? Have you called them? The big knock against upright freezers is that whenever the door is opened, all the cold air rushes out.
Odd, Chapmans recommends -12 to -14C.
https://chapmans.ca/scoop/7-tips-to-get ... ice-cream/

We have just moved the ice cream away from the airflow in the freezer and lower, so that should help. Either way, we have it set to -14 to -17C which is basically the recommended setting. I think it is a combination of the ice cream being under the vent and being on the top shelf. The milk right beside it is completely frozen.

I will say - the commercial freezers have about 20 settings to set...so much more complicated than the residential ones. It only takes about 4 mins to get it back down to -17C after we have the door open for a few mins (it reaches maybe -1C).

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