Computers & Electronics

Computer Power Supply Broken?

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  • May 7th, 2020 6:59 pm
[OP]
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Jun 15, 2006
1267 posts
145 upvotes

Computer Power Supply Broken?

My Corsair power supply provides power (my motherboard light comes on) and the CPU fan spins up for 2-3 seconds and then stops. The computer doesn't post and won't boot. I changed to another power supply and the computer works fine, so I know it's my Corsair that is problematic. Is this something that is fixable or is the power supply dead? It's obviously supply some power with the motherboard light turning on and staying on, and the CPU fan spinning the first 2-3 seconds. Does anyone have any suggestions?
10 replies
Deal Guru
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Oct 24, 2012
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Montreal
Check if there is any damaged cable or pins, an electrical short would cause the PSU to turn on and off right away.

Otherwise, it would be an internal component. I wouldn't dare try to fix a PSU. It would mean figuring out which capacitor needs to be replaced and risking getting a huge electrical shock fiddling around in that box.

If it's out of warranty, toss it in the garbage and buy another one.
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Mar 31, 2017
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nothing you can fix in there, and as mentioned the shock from the PSU can stop your heart. So dont waste time with a sub $100 item. If it is modular, throw out the modular cables as well since the cabling wiring sequence isnt universal for modular systems.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 1, 2006
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Toronto
If you know what you're doing, a power supply is usually an easy repair. However, given their prices in the new and used markets, it's usually cheaper and faster to buy a replacement unit.
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Aug 23, 2019
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Corsairs warranty is pretty decent from what ive seen. so if yours still applies i wouldnt hesitate and get it replaced even if its something minor.
[OP]
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Jun 15, 2006
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Ok thanks guys, I guess I'll ditch it. It's a little frustrating because it is definitely supply power to the motherboard, but it appears something else must be wrong to prevent it from booting the computer. Unfortunately, I didn't keep the receipt to go the warranty route and prices of PC components are all higher these days from the weaker Canadian dollar and I presume supply chain disruptions.
Deal Expert
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Oct 26, 2003
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I had psu go dead on me so it is entirely possible, although it only happened to a no name brand psu before and no longer an issue once I switched over to name brand. That said, if you have warranty, use it, otherwise it is another piece of tech trash.
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May 9, 2006
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enigma54 wrote: Ok thanks guys, I guess I'll ditch it. It's a little frustrating because it is definitely supply power to the motherboard, but it appears something else must be wrong to prevent it from booting the computer. Unfortunately, I didn't keep the receipt to go the warranty route and prices of PC components are all higher these days from the weaker Canadian dollar and I presume supply chain disruptions.
It sucks when components break, but be thankful whatever is wrong with the PSU, that it didn't end up frying your system.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 7, 2017
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SW corner of the cou…
If you are up to the challenge, after the PSU has powered down (keep it grounded but no power going to it) and the capacitors have discharged, you can take off the cover and look at it. Look at the capacitors and see if there are any (hopefully just one) that are bulging or leaking. If you see such and it is easy to solder out and install a new one, get the capacitor value (voltage and capacitance) and order a new one if it is not expensive (you can get a higher voltage one but capacitance must be the same).

Had a pre-amp that I paid around a grand for over 30 years ago. Sent it for rebuild didn't use it until quite a few years later. Ran for a few minutes before something went. Didn't look at it for over 15 years. Friend came over and told me what it might be. Opened it up and there was a capacitor (IC or Illinois Capacitor from the early '90s) leaking away. Cut it off soldered a new (German) one to replace it and it worked beautifully. Replaced the other 4 or so power caps and the unit works wonderfully. I'd change the signal capacitors with new, better ones if the circuit board wasn't so difficult to remove.
Cream rises to the top. So does scum.
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Oct 24, 2012
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enigma54 wrote: Ok thanks guys, I guess I'll ditch it. It's a little frustrating because it is definitely supply power to the motherboard, but it appears something else must be wrong to prevent it from booting the computer.
Power supplies deliver 5v and 12v direct current. When a PSU fails, 99% of the time it's the 12v that's broken.


When your motherboard's LED is on, that's the 5v supply. When you boot it up, the 12v kicks in, but in your case it fails almost instantly, so it is obviously broken.


enigma54 wrote: Unfortunately, I didn't keep the receipt to go the warranty route and prices of PC components are all higher these days from the weaker Canadian dollar and I presume supply chain disruptions.
Call Corsair's customer support, maybe they can track the age of the PSU using the serial number.

Otherwise, look up on Kijiji for some gamer who is upgrading his PSU. I got a good Thermaltake 650W for $60 before.
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Mar 31, 2017
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Ever heard of the one-handed electrician method? If you must be stupid then do that. But there is nothing to be fixed inside, unless you have a background in fixing electronics and can desolder and replace (and find parts in a pandemic btw nothing is shipping from aliexpress china) the parts.

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