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Condensation "between" the glass windows - Solution?

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  • May 9th, 2019 11:24 pm
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Deal Addict
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Dec 15, 2001
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Toronto

Condensation "between" the glass windows - Solution?

I'm about to place an offer on a 10 year old house, that has this issue.

There's slight moisture between two panes of glass throughout the house. Meaning you can't feel the moisture with your hand, you just see it. I'm guessing the gas in the windows are punctured, damaged or just poorly designed windows. I see "two black rubber plugs" at the bottom of every window (between the glass panes) where I assume the window manufacture injected gas, which I suspect is the problem.

What are my options to repair these? Can I just hire someone to replace the "glass portion" of the windows, or do I need to replace the entire window?

Please chime in with your opinions! Need to adjust my offer price, base on what the solution is. Thanks!
12 replies
Deal Expert
Jan 15, 2006
15696 posts
13409 upvotes
Richmond Hill
The solution is replacing the window sadly.
Jr. Member
Feb 28, 2018
149 posts
97 upvotes
Waterloo region
you can have the sealed glass units replaced without changing the complete window...
Jr. Member
Feb 28, 2018
149 posts
97 upvotes
Waterloo region
changing the glass is a lot cheaper and easier than the complete window... can even do it yourself if your half handy...
I have changed 3 on my parents windows

Last edited by tralexus1 on May 9th, 2019 12:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Fanatic
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Oct 16, 2008
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Maple
tralexus1 wrote: you can have the sealed glass units replaced without changing the complete window...
Any suggestion of company? My existing windows has its panes like this. I would be a waste, expensive and hassle to replace whole windows.
Deal Addict
Dec 14, 2011
1598 posts
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London
I do not know if this is the case or not, but...I know a guy (classic start to a story that I don't know if it is pertinent in your case)

He has a business where he goes to your house that has broken seals and moisture inside. His contention is that the gas provides very little insulation and that you don't really need it. So he drills a couple small holes in the glass, squirts in some type of chemical that over a few days dries out the window. Then he inserts a valve plug into the holes that he drilled that lets the drying air out, but doesn't let moist air from the outside in.

Maybe the house had this done and it just hasn't dried out yet?

Like I said, I only know a guy that does this. I think it sounds like a way of getting around an expensive replacement job.
Deal Expert
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Nov 28, 2016
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Out west
tralexus1 wrote: you can have the sealed glass units replaced without changing the complete window...
Correct, unless you plan on a window upgrade to a better window, this is the cheapest solution. Have done this multiple times due to a rock flying from the lawnmower. One big window to replace was $400, a brand new window was 2K

No one could afford to replace their entire window everytime an accident happens and its cracked
Deal Addict
Jan 21, 2018
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Vancouver
Drakestar wrote: He has a business where he goes to your house that has broken seals and moisture inside. His contention is that the gas provides very little insulation and that you don't really need it. So he drills a couple small holes in the glass, squirts in some type of chemical that over a few days dries out the window. Then he inserts a valve plug into the holes that he drilled that lets the drying air out, but doesn't let moist air from the outside in.
I've seen this mentioned before, and you can probably find a local service that does it. People say that the results are effective in terms of getting rid of the moisture inside the window or glass door. Obviously the seal is already punctured somewhere and whatever superior-insulation-gas was in there has long since leaked out. This is a very common problem, so obviously the standards for double-glazed window manufacturing are pretty weak.
Deal Expert
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Nov 28, 2016
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Out west
Where did TomLafinsky's answer go. He said the only way to do this was replace the entire window.

Save face to a wrong answer?
Sr. Member
Mar 15, 2005
688 posts
540 upvotes
we found a similar issue last year as part of our home inspection after putting an offer on the house.

We put a condition on the sale that windows be fixed. The previous owner had the windows installed within the last few years, there was a manufacturing defect with the batch.
The previous owner agreed and had it fixed by the time we moved in. In our case I beleive the windows were still under warranty.
Deal Expert
Jan 15, 2006
15696 posts
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Richmond Hill
WikkiWikki wrote: Where did TomLafinsky's answer go. He said the only way to do this was replace the entire window.

Save face to a wrong answer?
Lol learned something new today.
Deal Addict
Feb 4, 2010
4143 posts
2929 upvotes
GSXXRR wrote: I'm about to place an offer on a 10 year old house, that has this issue.

There's slight moisture between two panes of glass throughout the house. Meaning you can't feel the moisture with your hand, you just see it. I'm guessing the gas in the windows are punctured, damaged or just poorly designed windows. I see "two black rubber plugs" at the bottom of every window (between the glass panes) where I assume the window manufacture injected gas, which I suspect is the problem.

What are my options to repair these? Can I just hire someone to replace the "glass portion" of the windows, or do I need to replace the entire window?

Please chime in with your opinions! Need to adjust my offer price, base on what the solution is. Thanks!
Is lowering the offer to factor in the cost of replacing windows an option?
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
9634 posts
5033 upvotes
Paris
It’s easy to replace sealed units. You do need glazing tape and a sorta specialty glass suction thing that I think you can get at Princess Auto for $60 (you will need two of those cheaper ones). We use a single suction cup thing but it’s amazing and was around $350.

All three things are easy enough to get (glazing tape from your sealed window guy). You don’t go to a window company for this, but a glass shop.

You pop the stops take the existing glass out, measure the length and width (precisely, trust me, 1/16” matters) and the depth (which means you need to remove the glass somewhat at this stage), put the stops back on. Order new sealed unit, get it, pull the old out, prep the opening with new glazing tape, small prayer and set it in place, stops back on, beer. Your first one will take 3 hours, your second 2 hours total for all steps.

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