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Convert cold room to regular storage

  • Last Updated:
  • Jul 5th, 2020 10:02 pm
[OP]
Member
Nov 22, 2007
302 posts
64 upvotes
Toronto

Convert cold room to regular storage

Hi. We moved into a new home last year and which has a cold room. We think it’s a pain to maintain with humidity and all.

We would like to get it converted to a regular storage room but we are reading lot of different stuff so wanted to ask the experts here.

What should we be telling the contractors? Believe it allready has framing (we have a finished basement) so should it be install vapour barrier and insulation before drywalling it?

Plug the air holes? Would we have to put a duct and vents? The floor is tiled so anything needed underneath? Too confused so any help would be appreciated.

Thanks folks
2 replies
Newbie
May 30, 2009
82 posts
171 upvotes
Kitchener
Here's what I did. My cold room is also under the porch and was bare concrete walls and ceiling. It is closed off from the rest of the basement with a steel door that has a rubber gasket all around. It also has two vents going to the outside.

Humidity in the summer was very high, I bought a cheap thermometer thing off Amazon and it registered around 70%

To seal it off, I purchased 2" rigid foam sheets (the type with silver backing on one side and green backing on the other) and installed them on the walls and ceiling. All seams and corners were tuck taped and any irregular gaps were sealed with expanding foam. I used dricore panels on the floor and also sealed the floor where it met the floor.

I purchase a bathroom exhaust fan and some flexible ducting and connected it to one of the vents. The idea being that the fan would pull any moisture out of the room and expel it outside while the other vent would draw in fresh air. The flexible ducting was sealed with foam and tuck tape

After day 2, the humidity measured 50% and the damp smell was practically gone. I could still kinda smell it but it was significantly diminished. A week later, the humidity is down to 42% and holding steady.

I bought a dehumidifier, the kind with the auto drain, and routed the hose to a nearby sump pump. The dehumidifier is set to 30% humidity and it does a great job of maintaining that level. It's not running all the time which leads me to think there is still some humidity, likely pulled in from one of the vents but I've never seen the humidity go past 30%

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