Food & Drink

Copper mixing bowl?

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  • Jul 31st, 2020 7:48 pm
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[OP]
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Copper mixing bowl?

Was looking to buy a copper mixing bowl since egg whites are always hit or miss with my current equipment.

But these things are so expensive. The cheapest I could find so far are these ones: https://www.bedbathandbeyond.ca/store/p ... per-mixing and they do not look like they'd work in a stand mixer.

Searched RFD for historic deals, but most of the deals were for copper plated bowls from 2017/2018.

Have I been lied to by youtube cooking channels? Is there actually no market for these things?
22 replies
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May 30, 2010
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Copper has no additional advantage over a good heavy gauge stainless steel, or a glass bowl for egg whites. You need them clean and cool or cold. The same as when making whipped cream. And the heat distribution of a stainless steel bowl is sufficient for a Swiss meringue, due to low heat over a longer time frame.

I follow Stella Park from SeriousEats, she is a baker and talks a lot about realistic techniques for various baking tasks. Here is a recipe where she talks about making Swiss meringue:
https://www.seriouseats.com/2016/11/how ... ingue.html

Now, copper cooking pot, that's another story altogether.
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Aug 22, 2006
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my0gr81 wrote: Copper has no additional advantage over a good heavy gauge stainless steel, or a glass bowl for egg whites.
Really? I was always taught that it did.
The ions or something in copper basically did what cream of tartar did. This is less necessary with cream of tartar though.
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death_hawk wrote: Really? I was always taught that it did.
The ions or something in copper basically did what cream of tartar did. This is less necessary with cream of tartar though.
Copper by itself is not food safe, copper pots and bowls are usually lined with another non- reactive metal, like tin. Any contact of the food is then with top layer, not the copper. Copper has excellent heat distribution,

https://www.finecooking.com/article/cop ... -or-poison
https://www.marlinwire.com/blog/food-sa ... wire-forms

Besides, if there was molecular transfer between the surface and the food, it wouldn't be FDA approved in the states and HC approved here.

Cream of tartar acts as stabilizer for the little amounts of protein in the whites, and helps when whipping manually. Use a mixer, keep everything clean and cold and you shouldn't need it.
Last edited by Gr8irlbot on Jul 24th, 2020 7:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Aug 22, 2006
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my0gr81 wrote: Copper by itself is not good safe,
Wait. What?
Not that copper is used often now, but a lot of plumbing is copper.
copper pots and bowls are usually lined with another non- reactive metal, like tin. Any contact of the food is then with top layer, not the copper.
While some cookware is usually lined, I'm pretty sure bowls aren't.
There's also some specialty cookware (ie candy making kettles) that also aren't lined.
Cream of tartar acts as stabilizer for the little amounts of protein in the whites, and helps when whipping manually.
This was what I thought the point of copper was, especially before cream of tartar was invented.
Use a mixer, keep everything clean and cold and you shouldn't need it.
I mean... my original comment was basically for before electricity was invented let alone mixers lol.
Today... yeah I'm using a mixer.
Do you not have anything else to do rather than argue with strangers on the internet
Nope. That's why I'm on the internet arguing with strangers. If I had anything better to do I'd probably be doing it.
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death_hawk wrote: Wait. What?
Not that copper is used often now, but a lot of plumbing is copper.


While some cookware is usually lined, I'm pretty sure bowls aren't.
There's also some specialty cookware (ie candy making kettles) that also aren't lined.


This was what I thought the point of copper was, especially before cream of tartar was invented.


I mean... my original comment was basically for before electricity was invented let alone mixers lol.
Today... yeah I'm using a mixer.
Yeah, I edited my original with more references. It's temperature or acidity related. Boiling water and anything with a Ph higher than 6 will not react. Also clarified that reaction between food and cooking surface is marketing.

If OP wants copper bowls, Mauviel has whole line of them:
https://www.amazon.ca/Mauviel-MPassion- ... B0002L5GH4
Last edited by Gr8irlbot on Jul 24th, 2020 7:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Aug 22, 2006
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my0gr81 wrote:
Yeah, I edited my original with more references. It's temperature or acidity related. Boiling water and anything with a Ph higher than 6 will not react.
Gonna recomment instead of editing.
I mean... that backs me more than it does you.
The amount of copper you're losing to cooking something is minuscule.
(Going at face value of that article) you need 1-2mg of copper a day.
They even state that a 10lb pot losing 1 GRAM of copper would wear down by 10%.
Now... I've never weighed (a copper) pot so I don't know how much it actually loses, but it's not like chunks are coming off.
The interaction with something like egg whites I'd be surprised if it was even 1mg.
This is again for cookware in general.
That article mentions beer production in copper.
So it's only unsafe for acidic foods, which egg whites aren't.
Besides, if there was molecular transfer between the surface and the food, it wouldn't be FDA approved in the states and HC approved here.
Again going by your link, as long as it's above a certain pH, it's fine.
If it was wide spread unsafe, we wouldn't have copper plumbing.
Do you not have anything else to do rather than argue with strangers on the internet
Nope. That's why I'm on the internet arguing with strangers. If I had anything better to do I'd probably be doing it.
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death_hawk wrote: Gonna recomment instead of editing.



I mean... that backs me more than it does you.
The amount of copper you're losing to cooking something is minuscule.
(Going at face value of that article) you need 1-2mg of copper a day.
They even state that a 10lb pot losing 1 GRAM of copper would wear down by 10%.
Now... I've never weighed (a copper) pot so I don't know how much it actually loses, but it's not like chunks are coming off.
The interaction with something like egg whites I'd be surprised if it was even 1mg.


This is again for cookware in general.
That article mentions beer production in copper.
So it's only unsafe for acidic foods, which egg whites aren't.


Again going by your link, as long as it's above a certain pH, it's fine.
If it was wide spread unsafe, we wouldn't have copper plumbing.
So the point is egg whites don't react with copper, hence copper bowls and pots have no advantages over a good stainless steel or glass bowl. Which then dispels the marketing of copper bowls as having an effect on egg whites. Their main advantage being even temperature distribution, which can be achieved by keeping everything cold to beging with, whatever the mixing vessel.
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Aug 22, 2006
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my0gr81 wrote: So the point is egg whites don't react with copper, hence copper bowls and pots have no advantages over a good stainless steel or glass bowl. Which then dispels the marketing of copper bowls as having an effect on egg whites.
That's the thing. Egg whites do react with copper. That's why you typically need an acid like cream of tartar when using stainless steel or glass.
It's not marketing.
Marketing today may well bring back the use of copper, but it was historically used back in the day for this specific reason.
Nowadays we have stuff like electricity, mixers, etc which do a better job, but back when these things didn't exist, copper made a better product than something that wasn't copper.
Do you not have anything else to do rather than argue with strangers on the internet
Nope. That's why I'm on the internet arguing with strangers. If I had anything better to do I'd probably be doing it.
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my0gr81 wrote: Copper has no additional advantage over a good heavy gauge stainless steel, or a glass bowl for egg whites.
So I decided to do more research into this because I was curious.
Copper 100% has an effect.
It creates a better sulfur bond with the egg white proteins, something stainless or glass can't do.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egg_white#Copper_bowl
https://cooking.stackexchange.com/quest ... egg-whites
https://culinarylore.com/food-science:w ... gg-whites/
You need them clean and cool or cold.
So I was thinking about this too, and this is also incorrect.
Egg whites should be room temperature, not cold. Whip cream should definitely be cold, but egg whites should be warm.
Your swiss meringue recipe also reflects this.
Do you not have anything else to do rather than argue with strangers on the internet
Nope. That's why I'm on the internet arguing with strangers. If I had anything better to do I'd probably be doing it.
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Make sure the bowl, beater, and egg white is absolutely dry (free of water - albumen .NE. water). So if you wash your hands and eggs and any equipment before you crack the eggs, make sure everything is dry.
I smile when I see container ships sailing past my house laden with stuff made in China
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I've heard it's not about the equipment but the motion in the Ocean.:)
[OP]
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my0gr81 wrote: Copper has no additional advantage over a good heavy gauge stainless steel, or a glass bowl for egg whites. You need them clean and cool or cold. The same as when making whipped cream. And the heat distribution of a stainless steel bowl is sufficient for a Swiss meringue, due to low heat over a longer time frame.

I follow Stella Park from SeriousEats, she is a baker and talks a lot about realistic techniques for various baking tasks. Here is a recipe where she talks about making Swiss meringue:
https://www.seriouseats.com/2016/11/how ... ingue.html

Now, copper cooking pot, that's another story altogether.
death_hawk wrote: Really? I was always taught that it did.
The ions or something in copper basically did what cream of tartar did. This is less necessary with cream of tartar though.
my0gr81 wrote: Yeah, I edited my original with more references. It's temperature or acidity related. Boiling water and anything with a Ph higher than 6 will not react. Also clarified that reaction between food and cooking surface is marketing.

If OP wants copper bowls, Mauviel has whole line of them:
https://www.amazon.ca/Mauviel-MPassion- ... B0002L5GH4
death_hawk wrote: So I decided to do more research into this because I was curious.
Copper 100% has an effect.
It creates a better sulfur bond with the egg white proteins, something stainless or glass can't do.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egg_white#Copper_bowl
https://cooking.stackexchange.com/quest ... egg-whites
https://culinarylore.com/food-science:w ... gg-whites/
So I was thinking about this too, and this is also incorrect.
Egg whites should be room temperature, not cold. Whip cream should definitely be cold, but egg whites should be warm.
Your swiss meringue recipe also reflects this.
gh05t wrote: I've heard it's not about the equipment but the motion in the Ocean.:)
There was a point in my life where I was making fuwa fuwa pancakes every morning for breakfast, and I swear it didn't matter what I did, sometimes the egg whites didn't whip.

I've tried both glass and stainless steel mixing bowls, and I always put the seperated egg whites and the bowl in the freezer for 20 mins before whipping.

Sometimes I got perfectly whipped eggs other times I'm whipping for 10+ minutes on max speed with no luck, and I'm forced to eat flat pancakes.

At a 130$ a bowl, I think copper bowls will stay or if my reach for a bit longer. I'll try whipping at room temperature next time.
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gh05t wrote: I've heard it's not about the equipment but the motion in the Ocean.:)
In this case it's for sure the equipment.
But you still have to have the motion of the ocean. But since some people (not OP, I mean generally) can't get that motion, they need a "motor assist" Face With Tears Of JoyAstonished Face
PerformingAzura wrote:








There was a point in my life where I was making fuwa fuwa pancakes every morning for breakfast, and I swear it didn't matter what I did, sometimes the egg whites didn't whip.

I've tried both glass and stainless steel mixing bowls, and I always put the seperated egg whites and the bowl in the freezer for 20 mins before whipping.
The one thing about egg whites is that it has to be perfectly clean. Any sort of fat will screw you. This is probably where the unwhippable whites are.

Sometimes I got perfectly whipped eggs other times I'm whipping for 10+ minutes on max speed with no luck, and I'm forced to eat flat pancakes.
Is this via hand mixer or stand mixer? Don't tell me it was by hand... That's far too much work for a morning.
At a 130$ a bowl, I think copper bowls will stay or if my reach for a bit longer. I'll try whipping at room temperature next time.
Before you buy (assuming you haven't already) I assume you cream of tartar too? Perfectly clean equipment with room temp egg whites.
If that doesn't get you going, I'm not sure copper will either.
Besides... unless they make a copper insert for my stand mixer I'm not sure I'd invest because I don't want to whip that by hand or buy a hand mixer.
Do you not have anything else to do rather than argue with strangers on the internet
Nope. That's why I'm on the internet arguing with strangers. If I had anything better to do I'd probably be doing it.
[OP]
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death_hawk wrote: The one thing about egg whites is that it has to be perfectly clean. Any sort of fat will screw you. This is probably where the unwhippable whites are.

Is this via hand mixer or stand mixer? Don't tell me it was by hand... That's far too much work for a morning.

Before you buy (assuming you haven't already) I assume you cream of tartar too? Perfectly clean equipment with room temp egg whites.
If that doesn't get you going, I'm not sure copper will either.
Besides... unless they make a copper insert for my stand mixer I'm not sure I'd invest because I don't want to whip that by hand or buy a hand mixer.
I got an old Sunbeam mixer that's detachable. I definitely would not bother whipping egg whites by hand. I've never used cream of tartar before, will need to pick some up next time I'm at the store.
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Aug 22, 2006
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PerformingAzura wrote: I've never used cream of tartar before
Definitely try this before buying copper.
Copper is technically better apparently but even you eating those pancakes every day might not offset the cost of cream of tartar.
Do you not have anything else to do rather than argue with strangers on the internet
Nope. That's why I'm on the internet arguing with strangers. If I had anything better to do I'd probably be doing it.
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Aug 7, 2016
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death_hawk wrote: ………………….
Besides... unless they make a copper insert for my stand mixer I'm not sure I'd invest because I don't want to whip that by hand or buy a hand mixer.
I wrap a piece of copper wire around my whisk in such a fashion that it strikes the bowl.
Doing this provides the same effect as using a copper bowl and a stainless whisk, and the wire is easier to clean than a bowl.
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You don't need cream of tartar. Lemon juice is a good substitute. Also make sure you wipe the bowl with lemon juice beforehand to remove any
potential grease/oil.
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Tceight wrote: I wrap a piece of copper wire around my whisk in such a fashion that it strikes the bowl.
I'm sorry but that's DUCKING GENIUS.
I'm stealing that.
Do you not have anything else to do rather than argue with strangers on the internet
Nope. That's why I'm on the internet arguing with strangers. If I had anything better to do I'd probably be doing it.

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