Home & Garden

Cost to change from Fuse Panel to Circuit Breaker Panel

  • Last Updated:
  • May 12th, 2021 5:42 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Feb 1, 2011
58 posts
12 upvotes
Mississauga

Cost to change from Fuse Panel to Circuit Breaker Panel

Hey all. Anyone have any idea the cost to go from fuse box panel to circuit breaker panel. Old 100amp fuse panel with aluminum wiring needs to be converted to
Circuit breaker panel in Mississauga Ontario. Also, any recommendations for trustworthy electrical contractors to do the job would be appreciated!
10 replies
Sr. Member
Nov 26, 2008
923 posts
611 upvotes
GTA
I would expect 1200-2000 and also call for a few quotes.

I used to recommend one company but I haven’t heard from him in years since I left for another department.
Jr. Member
Nov 24, 2019
104 posts
66 upvotes
I did mine a couple years ago, cost me $1600, took the, half a day. Cant remember the name, only used them for that one job.
Deal Addict
Apr 26, 2003
1750 posts
835 upvotes
GTA
There are two things you mention - changing from a fuse panel and also having aluminum wiring. You can't simply just change the panel without addressing the aluminum wiring. If you don't want to go through the expense of changing the wiring, you will have to get each outlet/switch tested to ensure that it passes safety checks or else your house insurance won't cover you if there is a fire related to the wiring.

We did both recently with our house renovations to ensure that we didn't run into issues long term.
Member
Sep 8, 2002
279 posts
106 upvotes
Toronto
exrcoupe wrote: There are two things you mention - changing from a fuse panel and also having aluminum wiring. You can't simply just change the panel without addressing the aluminum wiring. If you don't want to go through the expense of changing the wiring, you will have to get each outlet/switch tested to ensure that it passes safety checks or else your house insurance won't cover you if there is a fire related to the wiring.

We did both recently with our house renovations to ensure that we didn't run into issues long term.
That's interesting. Aluminum wiring was used in the 70's. My house has it but also has a breaker panel.
I just looked it up. https://www.thespruce.com/service-panels-changed-in-the-1900s-1152732
Breaker panels became the standard in the 60's. So how did your house end up with a fuse panel and aluminum wiring? Guess a previous home owner did some electric work in the 70's but did not upgrade to circuit breakers at that point?
Deal Addict
Apr 26, 2003
1750 posts
835 upvotes
GTA
iambored wrote: That's interesting. Aluminum wiring was used in the 70's. My house has it but also has a breaker panel.
I just looked it up. https://www.thespruce.com/service-panels-changed-in-the-1900s-1152732
Breaker panels became the standard in the 60's. So how did your house end up with a fuse panel and aluminum wiring? Guess a previous home owner did some electric work in the 70's but did not upgrade to circuit breakers at that point?
My house was built in 1970, so maybe it was just a leftover from the fuse panel days. The aluminum wiring was totally a thing in this neighbourhood.
Member
Sep 8, 2002
279 posts
106 upvotes
Toronto
exrcoupe wrote: My house was built in 1970, so maybe it was just a leftover from the fuse panel days. The aluminum wiring was totally a thing in this neighbourhood.
Interesting! I guess 1970 was right at the borderline of builders flipping over to use newer tech.
Yes, aluminum wiring is also a thing in our neighbourhood. What kills me are all of the non-standard things I found in my house built in 1973. Toilet flange distance from the wall now is 14 inches. Ours was 13. So when we replaced the older toilet, we had to get a custom 12 inch tank. Kitchen exhaust pipe diameter? 5 inches. Home depot only sells 4 and 6 now.
So maybe the building code wasn't as strict or enforced back then.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 15, 2007
5227 posts
2663 upvotes
iambored wrote: Interesting! I guess 1970 was right at the borderline of builders flipping over to use newer tech.
Yes, aluminum wiring is also a thing in our neighbourhood. What kills me are all of the non-standard things I found in my house built in 1973. Toilet flange distance from the wall now is 14 inches. Ours was 13. So when we replaced the older toilet, we had to get a custom 12 inch tank. Kitchen exhaust pipe diameter? 5 inches. Home depot only sells 4 and 6 now.
So maybe the building code wasn't as strict or enforced back then.
Not sure what measurement you’re referring to but a standard toilet rough in is 12” from the tank wall to centre of flange
Everything has been said before, but since nobody listens we have to keep going back and beginning all over again. - Andre Gide
Member
Sep 8, 2002
279 posts
106 upvotes
Toronto
Red_Army wrote: Not sure what measurement you’re referring to but a standard toilet rough in is 12” from the tank wall to centre of flange
My memory is off by 2 inches then. If standard is 12, then our hole was 11 inches from the wall. So we had to buy a slim tank meant for flanges 10 inches from the wall.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Oct 19, 2008
6880 posts
2445 upvotes
GTA
exrcoupe wrote: There are two things you mention - changing from a fuse panel and also having aluminum wiring. You can't simply just change the panel without addressing the aluminum wiring. If you don't want to go through the expense of changing the wiring, you will have to get each outlet/switch tested to ensure that it passes safety checks or else your house insurance won't cover you if there is a fire related to the wiring.
There's no requirement that I know of to do a whole home check on each receptacle & switch when changing the panel; al or cu. Did the electrician doing the panel swap tell you this?
Deal Addict
Apr 26, 2003
1750 posts
835 upvotes
GTA
Zamboni wrote: There's no requirement that I know of to do a whole home check on each receptacle & switch when changing the panel; al or cu. Did the electrician doing the panel swap tell you this?
I had a house inspection done after we moved in to know what actually needed to get done and what could wait. The inspector noted that we had aluminum wiring and said that we didn't necessarily have to change the actual wiring when we replaced the panel, but in order to be compliant and not risk our house insurer denying any claims, we'd have to get the outlets tested and signed off on. In the long term, it made sense to rewire the house to avoid any future issues. He was actually surprised when my house insurance didn't ask about the electrical wiring when I moved it from our old place. Better safe than sorry.

Top