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Costco

120 Watt Solar Panel Kit - $200

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  • Jan 29th, 2022 12:39 pm
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Mar 3, 2017
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Woodstock
liquidnails wrote: Code is willprowse I didn't get charged tax either.
Thanks - I actually found that code online, used it, didn’t get charged tax or shipping either and then deleted my post (which you clearly saw lol). Thanks, though - should be useful for others!
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Apr 9, 2008
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Bby
Glad to help! The lithium batteries they have on sale are a game changer if portability is at all a concern. That was my last purchase
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Dec 10, 2008
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Quentin5 wrote: Pole or ground mounted solar may be a better option if you have space for it.
How much did it cost for the powerwall installed?
Do you have one or multiple?
Thanks, that's what I've been thinking about lately. We don't have a huge yard so we'd have to get creative with placement.

The Powerwall was free! Part of a pilot program with our utility to test grid load and at the end of it we were transferred ownership. They paid full install and hardware, so about $15K in value probably. But now I stare at it and think awesome backup when the power goes, but solar seems like an obvious next step
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Woodstock
liquidnails wrote: Glad to help! The lithium batteries they have on sale are a game changer if portability is at all a concern. That was my last purchase
Which one did you get / what do you use it for? Camping? I know there is some laughs had in here re: Tesla’s, but I have a Model 3 arriving in the next few weeks and I actually am looking into what it would take to supplement at home charging with solar (or to have a portable solution to get me out of a pickle if need be, regardless of it being ‘trickle’ charging)
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Nov 15, 2020
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is there a way to feed this power back into your personal grid to lower the cost (reverse) charged to you by your hydro provider?
[OP]
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Jul 19, 2021
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Zarkey wrote: Nice exaggerations. Germany isn't a "failure", theyre ahead of the curve in many categories vs other nations. The main issue is the housing, commercial sector that can't use renewables because theyre run on gas and oil.

and for every "oh look at Solyndra guyz" there's a Tesla (it's not just a car company) that also got massive loans/subsidies. Elon and his minions would never retell this.
tesla is a far bigger tax hog than solyndra could ever hope to be, where do you think his money comes from?

germany is an abject failure to anyone who is objective and looks at the true costs to society (i.e. the people working to pay for it)
even complicit rags like forbes admit it was, and is, a horrible disaster that the taxpayers still are bleeding from
Germany's Green Energy Disaster: A Cautionary Tale For World Leaders - forbes
Renewables Threaten German Economy & Energy Supply, McKinsey Warns In New Report - forbes

pincher creek's abject disaster:
Oldest commercial wind farm in Canada headed for scrapyard after 23 years
(try to imagine the ecological costs associated with the materials. construction, dismantling, disposal, etc. compared to the energy produced and actual watts delivered to anybody, let alone the tens of thousand of birds killed)

so no, i was not exaggerating
the only honestly economically and socially feasible way forward is to offer individual households incentives for non grid-tied renewables
anything else is a recipe for further subjugation, as history has proven over and over (i like the optimism that those in power are decent, but it is not true)

i'll ask one final question of anyone who wants to lay down (once again) and let the govt offer solutions by stealing from the people (once again):
how long have you lived off-grid to understand what it takes to work on a small scale?
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aptar wrote: Thanks, that's what I've been thinking about lately. We don't have a huge yard so we'd have to get creative with placement.

The Powerwall was free! Part of a pilot program with our utility to test grid load and at the end of it we were transferred ownership. They paid full install and hardware, so about $15K in value probably. But now I stare at it and think awesome backup when the power goes, but solar seems like an obvious next step
Very nice, you won a small lottery there!

As for adding solar the Powerwall likely makes it easier than if you just bought some batteries in bulk becasue the powerwall is an entire ecosystem on its own.

But its not likely fully plug and play, i would expect some setup, also you need to make sure if you use it during a power outage that its not energizing the grid which would kill utility workers restoring power.

One would think if the utility set it up that will be the case right now but make sure. And then if you add solar you need to make sure of this as well. I expect some extra cost from all this but the bulk of the cost is already paid, you have the powerwall installed and integrated. In Florida some found their solar power was useless when the grid died during a hurricane because the inverter was not designed to allow homeowner use.

First thing is that you want to make sure you have backup power during an outage. Did the utility set it up this way or not? They may have actually set it up so it shuts down during an outage. Or they may have it feeding the neighbourhood which could be islanded, or providing neighbourhood frequency services when there is no outage. I have no idea how its set up which is something you need to determine.

As for adding solar if its just for emergencies you might consider a few ~100-300W panels on poles you put up (or lay on the ground if there is no shade) when you want them in your small yard in an emergency if you decide not to go with roof installation then plug into your powerwall?
In fact in Rand McNally they wear hats on their feet and hamburgers eat people
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Dec 10, 2008
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Appreciate your feedback. Yes, it's fully set up to power our house when the power goes off (it has a dedicated breaker things were moved to), or manage energy distribution during the day if they introduce tiered rates in BC, or feed back to the grid if we are ever producing an excess, with all the appropriate equipment and signage to let workers know how it's setup. So for now, it's just a really nice backup generator.
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aptar wrote: Appreciate your feedback. Yes, it's fully set up to power our house when the power goes off (it has a dedicated breaker things were moved to), or manage energy distribution during the day if they introduce tiered rates in BC, or feed back to the grid if we are ever producing an excess, with all the appropriate equipment and signage to let workers know how it's setup. So for now, it's just a really nice backup generator.
Nice.
Does it stay fully charged, and/or does it cut your peak usage rate now?
In NH(iirc) they use them for grid peaks/stabilization and give the homeowners about 50% to play with.
Ideally it does not stay fully charged 24/7 (set it at about 75% ideally) and Tesla has software that fully charges Powerwalls when inclement weather is coming.
Do you have the Powerwall app?

You should be able to connect solar to it but you should figure out how, connect some panel(s) and do a trial run or even connect them permanently.
In fact in Rand McNally they wear hats on their feet and hamburgers eat people
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evilYoda wrote: is there a way to feed this power back into your personal grid to lower the cost (reverse) charged to you by your hydro provider?
Did you know that CRA would like to charge you taxes on you selling the electricity back to the grid and then charge the grid as well? So if the amount of electricity going both ways cancels out to zero, you both end up still owing to the CRA. This is complete insanity. This is in addition to all the set-up fees for net metering.
Last edited by elfion on Jan 21st, 2022 10:59 am, edited 1 time in total.
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travellerw wrote: 12V @ 98Ah (means you can draw 98A for an hour or 1A for 98h or anything in between)
Except there is also a limit on how much power you can draw from a given battery. Some 98Ah batteries can give you 98A, some can't.
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Dec 27, 2011
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elfion wrote: Except there is also a limit on how much power you can draw from a given battery. Some 98Ah batteries can give you 98A, some can't.
It was just an example to help understand the connection between A and AH (yes many people don't understand that!)
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Jul 23, 2015
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Konowl wrote: Debating grabbing a couple to throw on my powerless shed just for some lights etc.

How easy are these to mount (roof or wall).
If your goal is JUST to power some lights and you don't want to buy some LED (AA battery powered) lights from dollar store, then I would suggest something like these instead, costs less, less hassle to set up, no need to get individual components (ie SLA battery, cables), smaller footprint:

https://www.amazon.ca/Light%EF%BC%8CHan ... 59&sr=8-18

https://www.amazon.ca/Pendant-Outdoor-I ... 659&sr=8-9

You can buy something similar to this in the dollar store, but may not be as bright:

https://www.costco.ca/feit-led-work-lig ... 46824.html
Last edited by StaynorManor on Jan 21st, 2022 12:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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zoso454 wrote: Actually a panel this size is capable of charging 2 RV deep cycle batteries from 50% to full in a day. 90% of people who buy these will probably use them for an RV, that's why it's under RV accessories on the Costco website.
If you are buying these to charge batteries in your RV then you don't need the crappy near-useless inverter though. You're just wasting money. You'd be better off just buying a panel and charge controller separately and keeping the other $50 in your pocket.

Also, as another poster pointed out, 120w is not enough to do anything with really, it is not even going to keep the battery charged as you use it. You would want at least 2 of these panels on an RV and if you plan on running anything off an inverter you would probably want 4. Which means you're wasting a lot of money on crappy inverters and charge controllers that you aren't even going to use. The kit as-is-structured, doesn't make any sense. Now, if the kit had TWO panels (240w), and an inverter, and a charge controller, for say $300, now that would make more sense.
To be nobody but yourself - in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else - means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting. -- E. E. Cummings
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Dec 10, 2008
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Quentin5 wrote: Nice.
Does it stay fully charged, and/or does it cut your peak usage rate now?
In NH(iirc) they use them for grid peaks/stabilization and give the homeowners about 50% to play with.
Ideally it does not stay fully charged 24/7 (set it at about 75% ideally) and Tesla has software that fully charges Powerwalls when inclement weather is coming.
Do you have the Powerwall app?

You should be able to connect solar to it but you should figure out how, connect some panel(s) and do a trial run or even connect them permanently.
We have full control over ours from the Tesla app (I have an Model 3 as well). We don't have peak usage rates but they will come at some point, and at that time, we can use it to manage our usage. We try to keep it fairly full because a lot of power outages aren't triggered by weather, but I agree, makes sense for battery longevity.
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aptar wrote: We have full control over ours from the Tesla app (I have an Model 3 as well). We don't have peak usage rates but they will come at some point, and at that time, we can use it to manage our usage. We try to keep it fairly full because a lot of power outages aren't triggered by weather, but I agree, makes sense for battery longevity.
Your pretty set then.
I would aim for 80% max except when bad weather is coming. Get many more years out of the powerwall.

So what you need to know then is if during an outage you are able to use its energy and how to connect your own solar to it and to make sure its safe for utility workers if you do.
In fact in Rand McNally they wear hats on their feet and hamburgers eat people
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1226 wrote: Always wanted to do that too but I don't think it's realistic.
The fact that someone even had to say this as a reply

LOL
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danascully wrote: The fact that someone even had to say this as a reply

LOL
Charging a Tesla with solar power is not only realistic, its common.
I had read an article a while back about a survey that found that those who owned Teslas were more likely than the average population to have solar.
In fact in Rand McNally they wear hats on their feet and hamburgers eat people
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brunes wrote: If you are buying these to charge batteries in your RV then you don't need the crappy near-useless inverter though. You're just wasting money. You'd be better off just buying a panel and charge controller separately and keeping the other $50 in your pocket.
You could save $50 by buying just a panel and charge controller but by time you buy/make a panel stand and buy wire/connectors you don't really save any money at all. I got a smaller Coleman panel and it took about 1 minute setup new from the box....plug wires together clip connectors to battery and point panel at the sun.
Also, as another poster pointed out, 120w is not enough to do anything with really, it is not even going to keep the battery charged as you use it. You would want at least 2 of these panels on an RV and if you plan on running anything off an inverter you would probably want 4. Which means you're wasting a lot of money on crappy inverters and charge controllers that you aren't even going to use. The kit as-is-structured, doesn't make any sense. Now, if the kit had TWO panels (240w), and an inverter, and a charge controller, for say $300, now that would make more sense.
For the past 7 years my travel trailer has spent most of summers parked in the middle of nowhere with only 100 watts solar connected to two group 24 rv batteries. Often the batteries have low voltage like 12.4 in the morning but are charged and in float mode by the evening using only 100 watts of solar. In my trailer only 3 things draw any significant amount of power, the water pump, lights (all led) and controls to run the fridge on propane. There is plenty of power leftover to charge small electronics via usb plugs and run my 12 volt TV for an hour or 2 at night...no need to use an inverter.
.
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Quentin5 wrote: Charging a Tesla with solar power is not only realistic, its common.
I had read an article a while back about a survey that found that those who owned Teslas were more likely than the average population to have solar.
Er...

The model 3 has a 75 Kwh battery.

Charging 50% of the range with a 120w solar panel would take you 52 days assuming 12 hours of sunshine. Or 104 days for a full charge.

That's assuming 100% efficiency, which you won't have anywhere near close to.

This is exactly why Elon laughs off the ideas of putting solar panels on cars. The economics make no sense. You can completely cover a car in solar and sit it out all day in the Texas sun and only get a few miles of range. Solar needs square meters. It makes sense on a home or utility scale, or off grid camping with low electrical needs. It makes no sense to directly charge vehicles.
Last edited by brunes on Jan 22nd, 2022 5:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
To be nobody but yourself - in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else - means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting. -- E. E. Cummings

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