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[Costco] [“Smoking” Hot] Canada Prime Brisket $9.99/kg[YMMV]

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 16th, 2019 5:11 pm
Member
Aug 8, 2007
224 posts
106 upvotes
I was just at the Toronto Business Costco looking at their AAA brisket which was $8.95/kg and there were some marked Angus which got my attention but no prime there and I have never seen prime at the Business Costco. I was tempted but was also on my way to the RCSS to get prime rib so passed. We want to smoke but are amateurs just having tried once with our traeger and it was just so so. There are smaller sizes around or under 5kg at Costco which are good for our small family but my son says these are hard to smoke as you need to separate flat and tip and after doing so the pieces may just be too small. Any tips?
Jr. Member
Oct 15, 2013
197 posts
112 upvotes
Quebec, Qc
MaxQc85 wrote:
Apr 18th, 2019 12:11 pm
I never saw any brisket in Qc city area :(
Each time I go there, I'm checking for it
I’m from Qc city area too. Maybe we can group together and ask one of our three Costco to get some? I’m pretty sure they can do special orders if we’re like 15-20 customers asking for the same product at the same time. We could try to coordinate ourselves and order 3-4 times during summer.
Newbie
Mar 24, 2017
13 posts
Are these briskets trimmed? I know brisket is usually fatty which gives the flavour.
If they aren’t trimmed, do you normally trim it yourself before cooking or just cook it as is?
Member
Dec 19, 2006
389 posts
302 upvotes
Vancouver
hystavito wrote:
Apr 18th, 2019 2:08 pm
Does the grade make a big difference with a brisket, and when you're slow cooking/smoking it over 12+ hours? I've never paid attention to grade for the briskets I've done, which are usually done in the oven for minimum 14-16 hours. Unfortunately I suck at smoking, I can't keep the fire steady, but I had a nicely smoked one a friend did and as someone else said, it was one of the best things I've ever eaten.
It does matter, because brisket requires long cook times and is a fairly lean cut of beef. The more intramuscular fat you can get, the juicier the brisket will be. AAA is probably the lowest quality you want to go for smoked brisket, and AA will just leave you with some pretty dry meat. More fat also means more flavour.
Deal Addict
Apr 10, 2009
1546 posts
595 upvotes
Hamilton
Rpdp18 wrote:
Apr 19th, 2019 7:10 am
Are these briskets trimmed? I know brisket is usually fatty which gives the flavour.
If they aren’t trimmed, do you normally trim it yourself before cooking or just cook it as is?
Look up Franklin how to trim a brisket.
Jr. Member
Feb 23, 2011
167 posts
125 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
Rpdp18 wrote:
Apr 19th, 2019 7:10 am
Are these briskets trimmed? I know brisket is usually fatty which gives the flavour.
If they aren’t trimmed, do you normally trim it yourself before cooking or just cook it as is?
Search for “Franklin bbq trim brisket” on YouTube. It’s a nice video on how to trim a brisket and explains the anatomy of the brisket.
Member
Jul 11, 2009
347 posts
167 upvotes
Toronto
EYEAM2COOL4U wrote:
Apr 18th, 2019 8:48 pm
I was just at the Toronto Business Costco looking at their AAA brisket which was $8.95/kg and there were some marked Angus which got my attention but no prime there and I have never seen prime at the Business Costco. I was tempted but was also on my way to the RCSS to get prime rib so passed. We want to smoke but are amateurs just having tried once with our traeger and it was just so so. There are smaller sizes around or under 5kg at Costco which are good for our small family but my son says these are hard to smoke as you need to separate flat and tip and after doing so the pieces may just be too small. Any tips?
i'd never separate the flat & point and i can't understand why you would do that. i assume you're trying texas style? basically get some diamond kosher salt, black peppercorns and a grinder that can grind pretty coarse. season generously and throw it on the smoker next to a bowl of water at 225°F with some oak. when the brisket reaches 160°F, wrap it in pink butcher paper (also available at Costco Business centre) and continue cooking to 195°F, no more. at that point, if you hold the brisket at one end, it should be limp and bend over on its weight. stop the heat and leave it in there to rest until it reaches 150°F, then slice 1/2" thick to order.

last year i did a 9 lb brisket. It took 4.5 hours to reach 160°F, then another 3 hours to reach 195°F, then another 2 hours to rest to 150°F, for a total of 9.5 hours.

it takes alot of trial and error. make notes each time you do it and try to correct something the next time. don't get discouraged if it doesn't come out well. the time it finally does come out, it'll be worth it.
Member
Jul 11, 2009
347 posts
167 upvotes
Toronto
Rpdp18 wrote:
Apr 19th, 2019 7:10 am
Are these briskets trimmed? I know brisket is usually fatty which gives the flavour.
If they aren’t trimmed, do you normally trim it yourself before cooking or just cook it as is?
for smoking, the typical guideline is trim to 1/4" thick. i've tried trimming it, but i found it really difficult to not to trim too much (accidentally go overboard and trim most of the fat off so there's hardly any fat left, which may make it easier to have a dry brisket). basically you're trying to get rid of the rock hard fat (cuz it won't melt or render). i think 1/2" of soft fat is ok. these day's i suck so bad at trimming that i don't bother. i cross thatch the fat down to the meat so that some seasoning & smoke can get down to the meat, but unless it's crazy thick or hard, i'd just leave it alone. i tried smoking it fat down for the first time and it came out good. i'm sticking to that for now.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Dec 4, 2008
505 posts
59 upvotes
Montreal
You guys think $10/kg for Canadian Prime Brisket is "warm"?
Are you guys on crack?
A specialized butcher charges double for Canadian AAA.

This is a really good deal.

For all those who haven't had a good smoked brisket just watch this video:
Deal Fanatic
Aug 15, 2015
7058 posts
3191 upvotes
ON
Shaner wrote:
Apr 18th, 2019 11:55 am
Agreed. Best brisket I've ever had was when I smoked it, then sous vide for 30 hours, then sear. Best thing I've ever eaten to this day.

If my local Costco gets any in, I'll be buying a couple
What would you say the cost of that thing was with all the time and effort required ?
I don't doubt it tasted amazing, but I just don't have the patience and would've been nibbling at it at every stage...there would've been nothing left to sear.
Deal Guru
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Dec 17, 2001
11171 posts
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Brossard, Quebec
I wonder if this is a Western Canada only deal?
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User avatar
Jul 5, 2004
23700 posts
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dilligafeh wrote:
Apr 19th, 2019 10:55 am
What would you say the cost of that thing was with all the time and effort required ?
I don't doubt it tasted amazing, but I just don't have the patience and would've been nibbling at it at every stage...there would've been nothing left to sear.
The cost was just the brisket. I didn't buy a smoker and sous vide just to do that one brisket. I bought those things so I can eat good food on a regular basis. So I don't include the cost of those things into the brisket. I don't include my time as a cost either. I have to cook, there's really no choice. Besides, the time it took was to season it and throw it on the smoker. That's about 10 minutes at the most. While it's on the smoker, I can go do other things. I don't have the babysit. Then I have to put it in a bag and drop it into water. That's 5 minutes. While it's in the sous vide, I go about my life, such as going to work. No babysitting required other than to top up the water once or twice. Then I remove it and quickly sear it in a hot pan. That's 10 minutes or less.

So for very little time actually spent devoted to working on it, I get the best brisket I've ever had, and I've had brisket at the best rated BBQ joints in KC and Texas. I don't do brisket regularly, but when I do, I'm going to take the time and do it right. Brisket is easy to leave alone because you just can't pick at it. Until it's ready, brisket is very tough. You won't even enjoy picking at it. Once it's cooked, you can eat it without searing, I just like having a bit of a crust on mine. It's all personal preference.
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Jul 5, 2004
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JimU wrote:
Apr 19th, 2019 10:25 am
it takes alot of trial and error. make notes each time you do it and try to correct something the next time. don't get discouraged if it doesn't come out well. the time it finally does come out, it'll be worth it.
This is so true, especially with brisket. The best chefs out there have screwed up a brisket. You can do everything right, but sometimes it just doesn't come out great. Brisket is difficult and each one is different for some odd reason. That's why i sous vide mine. You will always have a moist, tender brisket if you sous vide. I've ruined enough briskets on the smoker (but also had some amazing ones) to realize that sous vide is the way to go.
Newbie
Feb 18, 2017
24 posts
4 upvotes
Leask
Shaner wrote:
Apr 19th, 2019 3:23 pm
This is so true, especially with brisket. The best chefs out there have screwed up a brisket. You can do everything right, but sometimes it just doesn't come out great. Brisket is difficult and each one is different for some odd reason. That's why i sous vide mine. You will always have a moist, tender brisket if you sous vide. I've ruined enough briskets on the smoker (but also had some amazing ones) to realize that sous vide is the way to go.
How do you you finish your brisket from the sous vide? i'm curious about this recipe. I've been wanting to try to sous vide a brisket but been shy about it.
Sr. Member
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Dec 4, 2008
505 posts
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Montreal
ESummer wrote:
Apr 19th, 2019 4:11 pm
How do you you finish your brisket from the sous vide? i'm curious about this recipe. I've been wanting to try to sous vide a brisket but been shy about it.

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