Sorry, this offer has expired. Set up a deal alert and get notified of future deals like this. Add a Deal Alert

Expired Hot Deals

Sorry, this offer has expired.
Set up a deal alert and get notified of future deals like this.
Set up a Deal Alert
Costco.ca

Chef'sChoice 315 XV Electric Knife Sharpener $89

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 6th, 2020 4:17 pm
Deal Expert
User avatar
Mar 6, 2003
18050 posts
10850 upvotes
Ottawa
DealCanuck wrote: How trustworthy is this brand? Never heard of them and $90 seems quite steep given that you can get a good whetstone for about $50
It's the most well known brand of automatic sharpeners. I have the Trizor XV which is the one of the top rated sharpeners.

Please update your profile to include your city. It's helpful when you post about something regional ucp.php?i=ucp_profile&mode=profile_info
Deal Addict
Nov 11, 2008
1720 posts
950 upvotes
Vancouver
Bought a few XV once at Bed Bath and Beyond / Winners for really cheap....around this price or less.

Also, you're better off doing all your knives at 15 degrees. Haven't seen any downsides compared to 20 degrees.
Member
Aug 29, 2018
340 posts
441 upvotes
shamans wrote: Also, you're better off doing all your knives at 15 degrees. Haven't seen any downsides compared to 20 degrees.
Depends on the hardness of the steel (which in turns depends a lot on composition and heat treatment). For relatively strong steel (hrc above 57-58), 15 is likely to be fine, but for softer steel, you'd have to hone really regularly, and sharpen more often.
Deal Addict
Jan 13, 2004
1346 posts
849 upvotes
Vancouver
DarkReaper wrote: As per their description:

How It Works: To sharpen Asian style knives or modern Euro/American style knives at a 15 degree angle, Stage 1 and Stage 3 are used. To sharpen 20 degree class knives, Stages 2 and 3 are used.
Not mentioned on the website, but my 1520 manual says you can sharpen at 15 degrees, then at 20 degrees, followed by polishing to create a trizor edge. So with that said, what's the difference between a 1520 and the trizor xv model other than marketing?
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Aug 27, 2014
7511 posts
3685 upvotes
Canuckland
DarkReaper wrote: As per their description:

How It Works: To sharpen Asian style knives or modern Euro/American style knives at a 15 degree angle, Stage 1 and Stage 3 are used. To sharpen 20 degree class knives, Stages 2 and 3 are used.
This is good enough for my uses then, all my knives are 15 angle
Sr. Member
Aug 13, 2011
742 posts
317 upvotes
Scarborough southwes…
How do these things work if your knife has a big bolster?
I've got some bolsterless Japanese knives but also a Wustof with a thick one.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Mar 6, 2003
18050 posts
10850 upvotes
Ottawa
turbo_slug wrote: Not mentioned on the website, but my 1520 manual says you can sharpen at 15 degrees, then at 20 degrees, followed by polishing to create a trizor edge. So with that said, what's the difference between a 1520 and the trizor xv model other than marketing?
It's confusing the models they have

They originally had a model called Trizor

But the new model does a "Trizor XV Edge", which is different from the original "Trizor" edge.
"The original Trizor® edge, an innovation from Chef’sChoice® has long been acknowledged for its superior sharpness and durability. Its uniqueness is the result of the triple bevel design of each of the two edge facets that meet to form the edge.

The Trizor® design uses multiple diamond abrasives of successively finer grits to shape the facets into a modified gothic arch to create an edge that has added strength, durability, and sharpness. In the original Trizor® edge the major edge angle is created at 20 degrees.

The new Trizor XV® edge is likewise made by a three step sharpening, honing and stropping process but the major edge angle is set at 15º (See Figure 1) for added sharpness and effortless use. "
So I assume that the 1520 is referring to the Trizor edge, not the XV edge?

The Trizor XV model does not do a 20 degree edge at all, all three stages are used for the goal of the 15 degree XV edge
Please update your profile to include your city. It's helpful when you post about something regional ucp.php?i=ucp_profile&mode=profile_info
Banned
Sep 27, 2010
109 posts
55 upvotes
Toronto
The 2 stage 315XV will do the 15deg with the 20deg edge, this from their website.

The 315XV applies a superbly sharp 15°XV™ edge for effortless cutting:

2-stages: combines the strength of the double-bevel edge with the flawless, ultra-sharp 5°XV™ edge technology
Ideal for sharpening contemporary double-bevel and traditional single-bevel Asian style knives
Advanced spring knife guides for accurate control of the sharpening angle and ease of use
100% diamond abrasives and advanced flexible stropping/polishing disks
For sharpening both straight edge and serrated blades
The 315XV is our new, budget-friendly 2-Stage edition of the critically-acclaimed 3-Stage 15 XV

I would prefer this over the 1520 due to it’s smaller size.
Deal Addict
Oct 3, 2017
1194 posts
1081 upvotes
MrMimizu wrote: How do these things work if your knife has a big bolster?
I've got some bolsterless Japanese knives but also a Wustof with a thick one.
My Zwillings have thick bolster. 1520 had no problem.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 13, 2008
3739 posts
5141 upvotes
Oakville
The OP posted 2-stage 315 XV is the budget option of the highly acclaimed 3-stage Trizor XV model.

If have Japanese blades, then getting the OP version is a no brainer (or get the Trizor XV).

Both the 315 XV and Trizor XV are far superior than the previously posted 1520 model when it comes to rejuvenating dull and distressed knives.

The 1520 is best suited for those whom:
1) have well kept knives
2) Want to maintain the 20 angle of their european/american knives

Otherwise, if you're okay with regularly sharpening your european/american knives every 2-15 days (depending on how you use it, after its converted to 15 degree) then get the Trizor XV, for $180ish.
If you are on a budget, get the Costco deal for the 315 XV for $90ish.

The 1520 is listed as 3-stage, but in reality it is equivalent to a 2 stage since you can only use stage 1 and 2 for specific angles (15 or 20).
The Trizor XV similarly is listed as 3-stage, but the first stage will only be used to repair heavily distressed 15-degree knives, or convert a 20 degree by running it down first bevel.
-ZdpZ... ;)
Deal Addict
Oct 3, 2017
1194 posts
1081 upvotes
My German knives were incredibly dull and distressed and the 1520 brought them back to life nicely.
Deal Addict
Nov 11, 2008
1720 posts
950 upvotes
Vancouver
pbeutch wrote: Depends on the hardness of the steel (which in turns depends a lot on composition and heat treatment). For relatively strong steel (hrc above 57-58), 15 is likely to be fine, but for softer steel, you'd have to hone really regularly, and sharpen more often.
In my experience, the softer steels simply are easier to crack/pit when abused....like when you accidentally try to cut through bone. I find you actually have to sharpen less at 15 degrees because it retains a level of sharpness for longer. There's the adage that blunt tools blunt faster and I find 20 degrees to blunt a little faster...the opposite of what you are proposing.
Member
Aug 29, 2018
340 posts
441 upvotes
shamans wrote: In my experience, the softer steels simply are easier to crack/pit when abused....like when you accidentally try to cut through bone. I find you actually have to sharpen less at 15 degrees because it retains a level of sharpness for longer. There's the adage that blunt tools blunt faster and I find 20 degrees to blunt a little faster...the opposite of what you are proposing.
I don't know this adage but the consensus for kitchen knives is exactly the opposite: harder steels are more likely to chip (that's why people refrain from using Japanese knives on hard things such as bones, or even some hard vegetables). On the contrary, softer steels are less likely to chip, but at the expense of sharpness lasting less long.

See for instance from here: https://www.misen.co/blogs/news/rockwell-hardness-scale
Generally, a knife with a Rockwell Hardness Scale rating of 58-62 will hold an edge better than a blade that has a lower HRC rating. Japanese-style knives tend to have HRC ratings of 60 and above.

But steel that’s too hard can make a knife blade brittle and lower its tensile strength, so the knife will be easy to damage if misused. Harder steel may also take more time and effort to sharpen, but then, of course, it will remain that way for longer periods of time.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Aug 27, 2014
7511 posts
3685 upvotes
Canuckland
Got mine today, great little machine.

Though set your expectations right, crappy knives will still remain due to steel quality.

Top

Thread Information

There is currently 1 user viewing this thread. (0 members and 1 guest)