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[Costco] COSTCO: 3M - Filtrete Furnace Filters, 6-pack 79.99 delivered

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 29th, 2019 11:03 pm
[OP]
Member
Nov 16, 2015
243 posts
426 upvotes
Toronto, ON

[Costco] COSTCO: 3M - Filtrete Furnace Filters, 6-pack 79.99 delivered

The warehouse only carries 16 x 25 x 1 so it's good price for these filters especially if you need another size
21 replies
Sr. Member
Sep 13, 2012
608 posts
270 upvotes
Vaughan, ON
These particular Filtrete filters with a 1500 MPR are great for the winter months but I wouldn't attempt to run these with the air conditioning on - you'll work the unit to death trying to push denser cold air through one of these as opposed to when the heater is working. I like to run Filtrete 600 MPR in the summer months and they work great.
Jr. Member
May 10, 2015
179 posts
75 upvotes
Orillia, ON
I've been told by multiple furnace installers, service, etc, to not run these dense filters. Just use the cheap fibreglass ones, they don't take much out of the air however you're not gonna burn out your vac system by using them. How do I know? Well, my previous furnace died because I ran super dense filters and it worked so hard and burned out.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
27418 posts
13353 upvotes
Ottawa
ryawesome wrote:
Apr 29th, 2019 3:54 pm
I've been told by multiple furnace installers, service, etc, to not run these dense filters. Just use the cheap fibreglass ones, they don't take much out of the air however you're not gonna burn out your vac system by using them. How do I know? Well, my previous furnace died because I ran super dense filters and it worked so hard and burned out.
What particular component in the furnace died?
Member
Apr 17, 2015
238 posts
124 upvotes
Toronto, ON
$34 for a 3 pack in store. Chances are, they'll put their higher rated Kirkland brand on sale afterwards.
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Newbie
Nov 25, 2015
68 posts
47 upvotes
Arva, ON
100Pacer wrote:
Apr 29th, 2019 3:19 pm
These particular Filtrete filters with a 1500 MPR are great for the winter months but I wouldn't attempt to run these with the air conditioning on - you'll work the unit to death trying to push denser cold air through one of these as opposed to when the heater is working. I like to run Filtrete 600 MPR in the summer months and they work great.
Wouldn't it be the other way around? The filter is on the inlet side, before the furnace or A/C does its thing. So if you're like most people and set the thermostat at about 23 in the summer and 21 in the winter, and let's say the thermostat has to swing half a degree before it kicks on ... then in the summer the returning air going through the filter is 23-23.5°, and in the winter it's 20.5-21°. Therefore the air going through the filter is cooler and denser in the winter.

Having said all that, I highly doubt a 3 degree difference in air temperature will make any kind of noticeable difference to the air density or the filter's ability to pass it.
Jr. Member
May 10, 2015
179 posts
75 upvotes
Orillia, ON
vkizzle wrote:
Apr 29th, 2019 4:35 pm
What particular component in the furnace died?
Sorry, I don't know the specifics. Just that they told me to never use dense filters like that again. If you want an air filtration system use something separate that doesn't impede proper function of the furnace.
Sr. Member
Sep 13, 2012
608 posts
270 upvotes
Vaughan, ON
6200cc wrote:
Apr 29th, 2019 5:26 pm
Wouldn't it be the other way around? The filter is on the inlet side, before the furnace or A/C does its thing. So if you're like most people and set the thermostat at about 23 in the summer and 21 in the winter, and let's say the thermostat has to swing half a degree before it kicks on ... then in the summer the returning air going through the filter is 23-23.5°, and in the winter it's 20.5-21°. Therefore the air going through the filter is cooler and denser in the winter.

Having said all that, I highly doubt a 3 degree difference in air temperature will make any kind of noticeable difference to the air density or the filter's ability to pass it.
The heat from the air is exhausted out the top of the air conditioning unit outside before the cold air is forced back into the house where it passes through the filter before being vented into the house. Unless my understanding is off? So if less cold air is able to easily pass through a pleated filter that has a higher MPR rating wouldn’t it take more time, effort, and energy to cool the house?
Newbie
Nov 25, 2015
68 posts
47 upvotes
Arva, ON
100Pacer wrote:
Apr 29th, 2019 5:42 pm
The heat from the air is exhausted out the top of the air conditioning unit outside before the cold air is forced back into the house where it passes through the filter before being vented into the house. Unless my understanding is off? So if less cold air is able to easily pass through a pleated filter that has a higher MPR rating wouldn’t it take more time, effort, and energy to cool the house?
Inside and outside are completely different air circuits. Outside, ambient air passes through the condensor, which has carried heat outside of the house via the coolant, cooling the coolant to go back in and absorb some more heat.

Inside, the furnace sucks air from inside the house (through the return vents). It first goes through the filter, then through the furnace and air conditioner A-coil (which, when the A/C is running, is very chilly due to the coolant being allowed to turn to a vapour). So the filter is always dealing with the inside ambient air temperature of the house.
Deal Addict
Sep 1, 2004
3038 posts
1800 upvotes
With the latest high efficiency furnace, higher MERV value to make components run overtime and burn them out.

So unless you are running a 20 year old furnance, just get 500 and call it a day.

If you must have 1500, just switch it out monthly in winter months and switch 500 in summer months.
Newbie
Apr 4, 2019
3 posts
100Pacer wrote:
Apr 29th, 2019 5:42 pm
The heat from the air is exhausted out the top of the air conditioning unit outside before the cold air is forced back into the house where it passes through the filter before being vented into the house. Unless my understanding is off? So if less cold air is able to easily pass through a pleated filter that has a higher MPR rating wouldn’t it take more time, effort, and energy to cool the house?
The air does not leave your house and go through the unit outside. It stays inside at all times. See an explanation here: https://www.hometips.com/how-it-works/c ... oners.html

You will want some sort of filter in place for the air passing through the evaporator coil.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 10, 2005
7382 posts
1832 upvotes
Xtrema wrote:
Apr 29th, 2019 6:01 pm
With the latest high efficiency furnace, higher MERV value to make components run overtime and burn them out.

So unless you are running a 20 year old furnance, just get 500 and call it a day.

If you must have 1500, just switch it out monthly in winter months and switch 500 in summer months.
Never heard of switching out to a "lower" filter during the summer. Is this a thing?
"Leaders who don't listen will eventually be surrounded by people who have nothing to say"
Deal Addict
User avatar
Feb 23, 2005
1588 posts
1848 upvotes
Toronto
vkizzle wrote:
Apr 29th, 2019 4:35 pm
What particular component in the furnace died?
I just had my limit switch stuck open. because i forgot to change filter. basically, if you don't get enough air flow, it will over heat and the limit switch trip. It suppose to reset itself after a few minutes, but do it enough times it will stay open.
Member
Jul 26, 2018
358 posts
326 upvotes
Canada, eh?
I bought a 1000 one for a 3 year old A/C (apt is rather new) the other day, think that would be OK? Didn't know highly dense filters caused issues.
Sr. Member
Sep 13, 2012
608 posts
270 upvotes
Vaughan, ON
6200cc wrote:
Apr 29th, 2019 5:57 pm
Inside and outside are completely different air circuits. Outside, ambient air passes through the condensor, which has carried heat outside of the house via the coolant, cooling the coolant to go back in and absorb some more heat.

Inside, the furnace sucks air from inside the house (through the return vents). It first goes through the filter, then through the furnace and air conditioner A-coil (which, when the A/C is running, is very chilly due to the coolant being allowed to turn to a vapour). So the filter is always dealing with the inside ambient air temperature of the house.
Now I’ve got proper understanding of the functionality - appreciate it. Would it not be beneficial then to have the air filter through as quickly as possible to reduce the process?

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