Hot Deals

Costco

Costco: SK-II Facial Treatment Essence $60 off

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 27th, 2023 12:00 pm
Newbie
Oct 21, 2011
94 posts
85 upvotes
This is a regular stocked item at Markham East and Yorktech. Currently same price as online $219.99 ($60 off)
Newbie
Aug 10, 2014
73 posts
281 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
Great price! SK-II is owned by Proctor and Gamble so its also legit and not from the grey market. Would join in on deal if I didnt already have one as backup.

Ive used many bottles of Missha, the dupe, but the brightening effects have pleateau'ed so I switched to SK-II. There is a noticeable difference but I wouldnt say its necessary. If you enjoy skincare and dont mind the price point however go for it.
Deal Addict
Jul 13, 2013
1989 posts
925 upvotes
Richmond Hill
I heard SK-II is overrated and overpriced
Deal Addict
User avatar
May 13, 2005
2117 posts
1374 upvotes
Toronto
Worth a shot at Costco. I bought this a few years back and it broke me out. Costco took it back no issues.
Deal Addict
User avatar
May 10, 2008
1400 posts
1441 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
Downtown Vancouver right now
Images
  • 489DD7C4-6AA2-48A2-96F8-628A783E338E.jpeg
Deal Addict
Aug 21, 2011
1443 posts
1085 upvotes
Whitby
grumble wrote: I just took a look at Pitera, and it appears to be a byproduct of sake production - it's a fermented rice liquid. Impact is questionable.

Frankly for face, you really want two items:

1. Am moisturizer with some SPF in it. Cerave AM is excellent.
2. Pm moisturizer without SPF in it. Cerave PM is excellent.

If shower in evening, put PM on immediately after showering before skin fully dries. If shower in morning, put AM on right after instead.

That has your ceramides (locks in moisture), hyaluronic acid (draws water into skin), SPF (protects from blemishes, skin damage, cancer), niacinamide (can relieve redness), doesn't clog pores. No strong fragrance. Low allergic potential. King of moisturizers. Both bottles put together are like 15-20% of this serum cost.
What about parabens in Cerave lotions? Isn't that bad? Their creams don't have but most of their face lotions have some parabens.
[external link removed]
Deal Addict
Sep 18, 2021
1304 posts
510 upvotes
SKS2002 wrote: I'm not the poster but CeraVe is in drugstores (like Shoppers) and some products are at Costco. In general, CeraVe is a safe line where most of their products will have some (or great) benefit to skin. They also do have body lotions and creams as well (that's what I linked for Costco).

In general, you want stuff that's unscented, without sensitizing ingredients (like fruit acids, lots of alcohol), and with beneficial ingredients like antioxidants and vitamins. Sunscreen for the day is essential. In general, it should be from thinnest to thickest (so from liquids to creams). Beyond that, price is not indicative of the product's strength or quality; you can build a solid routine using drugstore brands like CeraVe or even the "cheap" lines like the Ordinary or Inkey List; likewise, just because something is expensive does not mean that it's actually amazing for you (SK-II, La Mer, etc.).

The main issue with skincare is that people have to do their own research. Products are only regulated to a point and companies can sell stuff that can make your skin even worse. For the most part, a single brand can sell stuff that's both great and horrible for skin, so you have to pick and choose your products. Like, stuff that has made headlines (like parabens and that sunscreen ingredient that bleaches coral) are actually less of an issue that things like fragrance. Lastly, skincare is an individual thing; I've gotten much more interested in it over the years not only because I'm Korean but because my skin got ridiculously sensitive to various things over the past few years. What works for me may not work as well (or at all) for you and vice versa.

Paula's Choice has good informational posts about a lot of different things, including setting up a skincare routine. Their products are good (to great), but taking into account the USD/CAD exchange rate, there are better options.
I looked at some of the reviews at Shoppers from your link and it seems like the sunscreen face lotion has a rating of 3.0/5? With that many negative personal reviews, it can't be good right?

I've heard about Paula's Choice but I heard that a lot of their products have alcohol or parabens.
Member
User avatar
Dec 8, 2002
337 posts
251 upvotes
Edmonton
pprider wrote: I looked at some of the reviews at Shoppers from your link and it seems like the sunscreen face lotion has a rating of 3.0/5? With that many negative personal reviews, it can't be good right?

I've heard about Paula's Choice but I heard that a lot of their products have alcohol or parabens.
I personally don't like the sunscreen cuz it pills -- at least, it did for me. But in terms of ingredients it isn't bad.

Paula's Choice is very anti-alcohol. So this isn't true. (There are "good" and "bad" alcohols. The bad alcohols aren't always bad and in certain contexts can be a good thing, but PC will not use denatured alcohol in their products.)

PC kind of defends parabens, as does this pro-chemical website (lol). Others are more neutral (one, two) and of course some are negative (EWG, Elle). That said, I personally believe that "natural" isn't necessarily better, and that products will need preservatives, especially those with jar packaging (which isn't the best anyway).
Jr. Member
Dec 3, 2019
119 posts
168 upvotes
SKS2002 wrote: Pitera is now used in other skincare products (and at one point, Clinique -- a P&G company just like SK-II -- had a dupe that was, like, 20% of the SK-II price).
Correction - Clinique is not a P&G brand. It's owned by a competitor, Estee Lauder, which also has never been part of P&G.
I can't confirm or dispute anything else you said but this part is wrong.
Deal Addict
Apr 30, 2007
2453 posts
1575 upvotes
manho wrote: Who else sending it to their gf rn trying to score some brownie points?
Yo stop calling me out, she’s gonna see this…
Newbie
Nov 22, 2021
49 posts
41 upvotes
Alberta
I have SKII and I have tried Missha along with the other major K Beauty products. I debated getting SKII again as there isn’t a fragrance with it. Immediately it’s soothing for anyone with acne or rosacea. Then I tried the dupes. There are many on the market. I find they are similar. Missha products usually have a fragrance. Not too strong but it’s there. The SKII bottle from Costco is bigger than what is sold in airports etc. It’s 330 mL. So for me now, I’d rather order the dupes. When you order from the Korean stores, they usually give samples which are great for travelling!

Good luck ladies and gents. And FYI for men that shave their face, it helps with razor burn…and no I won’t let him use my SKII for that. I let him use one tiny bit lol!!
And yes I know SKII is a Japanese brand and not a Korean brand. The Korean brands are great dupes!
Be sweet NOT salty

But do you really need it?
Newbie
Nov 22, 2021
49 posts
41 upvotes
Alberta
Goonish wrote: Yo stop calling me out, she’s gonna see this…
Make some brownies then! Win win!
Be sweet NOT salty

But do you really need it?
Member
Oct 1, 2012
337 posts
214 upvotes
GVR
This product is good and is cheaper in Asia. I had to get a refund on a previous purchase, $269 plus tax, from Costco. I paid $190 incl. tax in Taiwan during the the last blk Friday. Nevertheless, this price is good in Canada.
Newbie
Aug 10, 2014
73 posts
281 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
kejongliu wrote: This product is good and is cheaper in Asia. I had to get a refund on a previous purchase, $269 plus tax, from Costco. I paid $190 incl. tax in Taiwan during the the last blk Friday. Nevertheless, this price is good in Canada.
$190 incl tax for the same size?
Deal Addict
Mar 22, 2017
2526 posts
3381 upvotes
West GTA
abshahul wrote: What about parabens in Cerave lotions? Isn't that bad? Their creams don't have but most of their face lotions have some parabens.
Parabens aren't a big deal:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/wellness ... an-beauty/

Basically the two risks associated with parabens are 'they are estrogenic' and 'they cause cancer'. Both sound really scary, but both do not appear to be a concern.

1. Some estrogenic activity was modeled by a chemist about twenty years back, but in vivo looks like common parabens are more like 1/100,000th the strength of estradiol, and you wouldn't see any impact until you used tens of thousands of times the concentration you find in common beauty products. If you're eating meals of straight parabens then it isn't ideal, but this is very weak activity that you'd find more powerfully in zillions of other common products (like say soy, rice, beans, oats, apples, sesame, coffee, beer, etc.). Personally not worried.

2. The study this comes from was the finding of very small amounts of parabens in breast tissue in a 2004 study, which prompted fear that, because parabens have the above estrogenic activity and because estrogenic activity in breast tissue might lead to breast cancer, caused a freakout. Well, we know the estrogenic activity is very low, the concentrations of parabens in tissue is very low (it's rapidly metabolized by the liver), and there's no indication that this tiny paraben concentration has any causative activity in breast cancer. The scientific community hates this study and has been dunking on it so much that the author released a statement saying that he never intended to indicate that parabens cause breast cancer, it was just a neat finding that tiny amount of of parabens were found in the tissue.

So, minimal estrogenic activity, rapidly cleared, no evidence it causes cancer, FDA has a 'no limit' sign on it, EU can go up to 0.8% in cosmetics, it's in like 90% of the packaged food you buy in the grocery store, and the alternatives used are either worse (like MIT, a contact allergen) or ineffective (a bunch of paraben-free beauty products have been recalled due to mold or bacteria and their shelf life is quite short).

That being said, if you're jittery about parabens I respect that and point you to their paraben-free generic moisturizing cream.
Deal Addict
Aug 21, 2011
1443 posts
1085 upvotes
Whitby
grumble wrote: Parabens aren't a big deal:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/wellness ... an-beauty/

Basically the two risks associated with parabens are 'they are estrogenic' and 'they cause cancer'. Both sound really scary, but both do not appear to be a concern.

1. Some estrogenic activity was modeled by a chemist about twenty years back, but in vivo looks like common parabens are more like 1/100,000th the strength of estradiol, and you wouldn't see any impact until you used tens of thousands of times the concentration you find in common beauty products. If you're eating meals of straight parabens then it isn't ideal, but this is very weak activity that you'd find more powerfully in zillions of other common products (like say soy, rice, beans, oats, apples, sesame, coffee, beer, etc.). Personally not worried.

2. The study this comes from was the finding of very small amounts of parabens in breast tissue in a 2004 study, which prompted fear that, because parabens have the above estrogenic activity and because estrogenic activity in breast tissue might lead to breast cancer, caused a freakout. Well, we know the estrogenic activity is very low, the concentrations of parabens in tissue is very low (it's rapidly metabolized by the liver), and there's no indication that this tiny paraben concentration has any causative activity in breast cancer. The scientific community hates this study and has been dunking on it so much that the author released a statement saying that he never intended to indicate that parabens cause breast cancer, it was just a neat finding that tiny amount of of parabens were found in the tissue.

So, minimal estrogenic activity, rapidly cleared, no evidence it causes cancer, FDA has a 'no limit' sign on it, EU can go up to 0.8% in cosmetics, it's in like 90% of the packaged food you buy in the grocery store, and the alternatives used are either worse (like MIT, a contact allergen) or ineffective (a bunch of paraben-free beauty products have been recalled due to mold or bacteria and their shelf life is quite short).

That being said, if you're jittery about parabens I respect that and point you to their paraben-free generic moisturizing cream.
Thank you for the elaborate response, personally I'm a fan of Cerave body cream but I have been avoiding their moisturizing lotions because of Parabens, if the ill effects of it are negligible then I might as well give them a try.
[external link removed]
Deal Addict
Mar 22, 2017
2526 posts
3381 upvotes
West GTA
abshahul wrote: Thank you for the elaborate response, personally I'm a fan of Cerave body cream but I have been avoiding their moisturizing lotions because of Parabens, if the ill effects of it are negligible then I might as well give them a try.
Everyone who has a concern should look into it themselves of course, this is just my take, as noted if you prefer to avoid them for any reason the general moisturizing cream jar is a perfectly fine alternative, it lacks a couple of the face cream bonus ingredients but it does the most important stuff the same (manages moisture in the skin). Would want to use an SPF with it in the morning though (no matter if you're going outside or not, or if it's winter, or if it's cloudy - wear sunscreen every day, start young and you'll look way better as you age (and really reduce skin cancer risks).
Deal Addict
Aug 21, 2011
1443 posts
1085 upvotes
Whitby
grumble wrote: Everyone who has a concern should look into it themselves of course, this is just my take, as noted if you prefer to avoid them for any reason the general moisturizing cream jar is a perfectly fine alternative, it lacks a couple of the face cream bonus ingredients but it does the most important stuff the same (manages moisture in the skin). Would want to use an SPF with it in the morning though (no matter if you're going outside or not, or if it's winter, or if it's cloudy - wear sunscreen every day, start young and you'll look way better as you age (and really reduce skin cancer risks).
Thanks, yes, I'm aware of the SPF usage irrespective of going out or not but I have a very sensitive skin around my nose so far all the SPFs I have tried have flared up my skin. I will have to try Cerave to see how it works for me.
[external link removed]
Member
User avatar
Dec 8, 2002
337 posts
251 upvotes
Edmonton
davisml wrote: Correction - Clinique is not a P&G brand. It's owned by a competitor, Estee Lauder, which also has never been part of P&G.
I can't confirm or dispute anything else you said but this part is wrong.
Thank you for the correction!

Top