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[Costco] Smart Trainer (Direct Drive) $850

  • Last Updated:
  • Jul 28th, 2021 7:55 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 27, 2019
13 posts
60 upvotes

[Costco] Smart Trainer (Direct Drive) $850

This is an excellent deal on a direct drive smart trainer with comparable features on smart trainers that are $1000+ plus.

Reviews from last year made some complaints about power accuracy on sprints and temperature drift. I'm not sure if this is a newer version with improvements, or firmware updates have improved things since... but honestly, if you are just looking for something to get fit indoors and have fun on Zwift, this is great.

If I hadn't already forked out $1000 for a Tacx, I would get this in a heart beat.

Likely will be harder to find once indoor training season rolls around.
109 replies
Sr. Member
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Apr 27, 2012
808 posts
624 upvotes
Ottawa
How does it compare to a similarity prices tacx flux s or flux 2?
Deal Addict
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Mar 28, 2006
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Toronto
Thanks OP.

For mere mortals who don't know what the heck this is:

Deal Addict
Apr 10, 2017
1770 posts
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Just waiting for someone to downvote because they dont know what theyre looking at

#RFD2021
Member
May 28, 2012
363 posts
299 upvotes
Canada
Here is a in-depth review of the trainer.

Sr. Member
Nov 13, 2018
640 posts
1439 upvotes
Legitimate question:

Why spend $800-$1200 on a smart direct drive trainer, when you can buy a power meter for ~$300 and a "dumb" trainer like a Kurt Kinetic for ~$400?

Then, you've got power and a trainer for Zwift, plus you now have power data for every single ride you do, indoors AND outdoors.

I've never understood the appeal of these devices that still require you to own your own bike, but are only really useful during the winter.
Deal Fanatic
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Aug 27, 2014
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Canuckland
I’ve never heard of them seems a bit pricey
Deal Fanatic
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Aug 27, 2014
6231 posts
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Canuckland
mikebmt wrote: Legitimate question:

Why spend $800-$1200 on a smart direct drive trainer, when you can buy a power meter for ~$300 and a "dumb" trainer like a Kurt Kinetic for ~$400?

Then, you've got power and a trainer for Zwift, plus you now have power data for every single ride you do, indoors AND outdoors.

I've never understood the appeal of these devices that still require you to own your own bike, but are only really useful during the winter.
I doubt you’ll find a KK for $400 anymore
Sr. Member
Nov 13, 2018
640 posts
1439 upvotes
DealCanuck wrote: I doubt you’ll find a KK for $400 anymore
Amazon has them for $428 free delivery in a week.

Besides, that didn't answer my actual question.
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 27, 2019
13 posts
60 upvotes
benzylique wrote: How does it compare to a similarity prices tacx flux s or flux 2?
The tacx flux s is $1000. The Flux 2 is $1300.

This one has a much higher spec for maximum power and also much higher grade simulation
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 27, 2019
13 posts
60 upvotes
mikebmt wrote: Amazon has them for $428 free delivery in a week.

Besides, that didn't answer my actual question.
You can't compare a direct drive trainer to the low end KK fluid resistance trainers. A whole different league of product. If you don't know the difference, then I would recommend researching the difference. Overall though, sounds like trainers are not for you.
Member
Oct 3, 2010
247 posts
165 upvotes
Mississauga
The review on this from gplama was not great. Think paying a bit more for an Elite Suito 2021 is better
Newbie
Jan 12, 2021
3 posts
9 upvotes
mikebmt wrote: Legitimate question:

Why spend $800-$1200 on a smart direct drive trainer, when you can buy a power meter for ~$300 and a "dumb" trainer like a Kurt Kinetic for ~$400?

Then, you've got power and a trainer for Zwift, plus you now have power data for every single ride you do, indoors AND outdoors.

I've never understood the appeal of these devices that still require you to own your own bike, but are only really useful during the winter.
This is like a peloton, but after the winter, you can ride your bike outside.

The one benefit these have going for them is ERG + Simulation mode, which can keep your sanity during Zwift, for example.

I think it's just another option in the market for training indoors.

Some people swear by TrainerRoad in the winter, where your scenario would shine. Someone using trainnerroad is more inclined to train with power and record that data outside through the year.

However, there are Zwift die hards (I was one at one point too) where simulation mode of the gradient changes is the only way it keeps them happy and interested for long hours indoors.

So while your scenario is cheaper and valid, I feel it's for a different segment of the market, just like this one is.
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 27, 2019
13 posts
60 upvotes
geophilips wrote: The review on this from gplama was not great. Think paying a bit more for an Elite Suito 2021 is better
Buy from where? And how much does it retail?
Sr. Member
Nov 13, 2018
640 posts
1439 upvotes
BoomerDoomer wrote: You can't compare a direct drive trainer to the low end KK fluid resistance trainers. A whole different league of product. If you don't know the difference, then I would recommend researching the difference. Overall though, sounds like trainers are not for you.
I've been training indoors for 7 years. I just can't understand why anyone would pay a thousand bucks for one of these when a fluid trainer is great, and allows you to use your own gears.

I understand Erg mode is 'better' for simulating Hills and stuff, but the drawbacks of these massive trainers seem to outweigh the benefits to me.

1) You've got to remove your back wheel to put the bike on the trainer, which would be a PITA if you just want to get some riding done in shoulder season where the weather fluctuates between being good for outside and not.

2) You've got to buy a second cassette, or also move your cassette from your bike. Which introduces a whole slew of problems when it comes to the wear of your outdoor cassette, indoor cassette, and the chain/crankset on the bike

3) As soon as you start riding outdoors you have no idea what your power numbers are. I'm assuming if you're serious enough to spend a thousand bucks on a Zwift machine, you'd want to have that data outdoors as well, and buying a power meter is way cheaper than buying one of these.

4) You need basically a permanent dedicated space for these because putting them away would require taking the bike off, leaving your chain dangling to stain everything, and they weigh a ton to move around.

doesn't require removing your back wheel and buying a separate cassette that doesn't match the wear of your chain/cranks
Last edited by mikebmt on Jun 23rd, 2021 8:59 am, edited 1 time in total.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Apr 27, 2012
808 posts
624 upvotes
Ottawa
BoomerDoomer wrote:
The tacx flux s is $1000. The Flux 2 is $1300.

This one has a much higher spec for maximum power and also much higher grade simulation]

The fluxs can be bought at sportchek for 25 percent off during friends and family. This looks similar to the kickr core .... Knock off brand? I can't find much info online
Last edited by benzylique on Jun 23rd, 2021 8:56 am, edited 2 times in total.
Sr. Member
Nov 13, 2018
640 posts
1439 upvotes
Leoboi420 wrote: This is like a peloton, but after the winter, you can ride your bike outside.

The one benefit these have going for them is ERG + Simulation mode, which can keep your sanity during Zwift, for example.

I think it's just another option in the market for training indoors.

Some people swear by TrainerRoad in the winter, where your scenario would shine. Someone using trainnerroad is more inclined to train with power and record that data outside through the year.

However, there are Zwift die hards (I was one at one point too) where simulation mode of the gradient changes is the only way it keeps them happy and interested for long hours indoors.

So while your scenario is cheaper and valid, I feel it's for a different segment of the market, just like this one is.
Fair enough. I guess I just feel that I would way rather have a power meter all year long instead of just one during the winter.

But people have tons of disposable income so they probably have dedicated indoor bikes for their trainers also.

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