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[Costco] SMOKIN HOT BRISKET $8.99kg

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  • Oct 18th, 2019 6:08 pm
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Jun 15, 2006
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Smoked one of these on my Kamado Joe at 265F. Weird thing is that it was cooking too quickly as the temp hit 180F after 2.5 hours?! So it never hit the stall at 160F. It was late at night so I didn't wrap until the next morning. But I dialed down the cooking temp to 215 and the brisket stayed at 180 until the next morning.

At that point, I wrapped in butcher paper and it slowly cooked for another 15 hours until it hit 200F. The flat was dry but the point was still good. I'm still puzzled why the brisket cooked so quickly in the beginning?
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May 17, 2006
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enigma54 wrote:
Aug 5th, 2019 10:58 pm
Smoked one of these on my Kamado Joe at 265F. Weird thing is that it was cooking too quickly as the temp hit 180F after 2.5 hours?! So it never hit the stall at 160F. It was late at night so I didn't wrap until the next morning. But I dialed down the cooking temp to 215 and the brisket stayed at 180 until the next morning.

At that point, I wrapped in butcher paper and it slowly cooked for another 15 hours until it hit 200F. The flat was dry but the point was still good. I'm still puzzled why the brisket cooked so quickly in the beginning?
Check your temp at the bench. I think 265F is too high for a slow cook.
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porksoda wrote:
Aug 6th, 2019 7:29 pm
Check your temp at the bench. I think 265F is too high for a slow cook.
That was actually the temp at the grill level. I was following Franklin BBQ’s method and he uses 275F in his book. What temp do you recommend?
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Nov 16, 2005
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Toronto
I use 225 on my pellet grill
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Dec 19, 2006
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Vancouver
enigma54 wrote:
Aug 6th, 2019 8:32 pm
That was actually the temp at the grill level. I was following Franklin BBQ’s method and he uses 275F in his book. What temp do you recommend?
You should get a thermometer with at least 2 probes so you can monitor the temp at the grate level as well. Also were you cooking directly over the charcoal?
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Apr 10, 2009
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enigma54 wrote:
Aug 6th, 2019 8:32 pm
That was actually the temp at the grill level. I was following Franklin BBQ’s method and he uses 275F in his book. What temp do you recommend?
275 indirect is fine. Could have been a faulty probe or a fat pocket in the meat.
If the flat was thin I'm not surprised it cooked quick, you may have hit a stall at 180 or so but each brisket is its own thing.
Follow Franklin and you'll be happy
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enigma54 wrote:
Aug 6th, 2019 8:32 pm
That was actually the temp at the grill level. I was following Franklin BBQ’s method and he uses 275F in his book. What temp do you recommend?
I think franklin uses offset smoker.
I would stick to 225-250 max... probably stick to 225 of indirect heat, this will take hours and hours but it will be tender, even the flat.
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Sep 1, 2005
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Myron Mixon cook brisket hot (300F) and fast.

We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!
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ocisnicola wrote:
Aug 6th, 2019 10:46 pm
You should get a thermometer with at least 2 probes so you can monitor the temp at the grate level as well. Also were you cooking directly over the charcoal?
CaptainCrash wrote:
Aug 6th, 2019 10:56 pm
275 indirect is fine. Could have been a faulty probe or a fat pocket in the meat.
If the flat was thin I'm not surprised it cooked quick, you may have hit a stall at 180 or so but each brisket is its own thing.
Follow Franklin and you'll be happy
porksoda wrote:
Aug 7th, 2019 11:57 am
I think franklin uses offset smoker.
I would stick to 225-250 max... probably stick to 225 of indirect heat, this will take hours and hours but it will be tender, even the flat.
I had two probes into the brisket and one for the grate and the numbers were consistent. I'm using a Kamado Joe and I used the heat deflectors, so technically it's indirect heat, but it's not an offset smoker which is what Franklin's uses in his book. So you guys are right and I think 275F or 265F is too high. I'll try next time at 225F or 235F. Ideally, I want to put it on at 9pm the night before, have the brisket hit 165F internal temp in the morning so I can wrap, and then have it hit 200F by 4pm, rest it for 2 hours and serve it for dinner at 6pm :)

What rub are you guys using? I've mainly just been using salt and pepper, but I was heavy handed with the salt this time and the brisket came out too salty.
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Apr 10, 2009
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enigma54 wrote:
Aug 7th, 2019 8:57 pm
I had two probes into the brisket and one for the grate and the numbers were consistent. I'm using a Kamado Joe and I used the heat deflectors, so technically it's indirect heat, but it's not an offset smoker which is what Franklin's uses in his book. So you guys are right and I think 275F or 265F is too high. I'll try next time at 225F or 235F. Ideally, I want to put it on at 9pm the night before, have the brisket hit 165F internal temp in the morning so I can wrap, and then have it hit 200F by 4pm, rest it for 2 hours and serve it for dinner at 6pm :)

What rub are you guys using? I've mainly just been using salt and pepper, but I was heavy handed with the salt this time and the brisket came out too salty.
I use the big Green egg. 260-275 is fine. Also I just use salt and pepper. More pepper than salt.
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Mar 15, 2005
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enigma54 wrote:
Aug 7th, 2019 8:57 pm

What rub are you guys using? I've mainly just been using salt and pepper, but I was heavy handed with the salt this time and the brisket came out too salty.
I also have a kamado joe and love it. Just parks at for hours and hours without any adjustments.

As for ribs, I've experimented with a few methods but keep going back to meatheads recipe.
https://amazingribs.com/tested-recipes/ ... rub-recipe. It smells good even before the meat starts cooking. The rub contains no salt but he recommends adding 1/2 teaspoon of salt per pound of meat to dry brine ahead of time. You can apply the rub either the same time or just before the cook starts.

I also started injecting a per meatheads suggestion, extra juicy! https://amazingribs.com/tested-recipes/ ... exas-style
Sr. Member
Sep 15, 2011
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HUNTSVILLE
enigma54 wrote:
Aug 7th, 2019 8:57 pm





I had two probes into the brisket and one for the grate and the numbers were consistent. I'm using a Kamado Joe and I used the heat deflectors, so technically it's indirect heat, but it's not an offset smoker which is what Franklin's uses in his book. So you guys are right and I think 275F or 265F is too high. I'll try next time at 225F or 235F. Ideally, I want to put it on at 9pm the night before, have the brisket hit 165F internal temp in the morning so I can wrap, and then have it hit 200F by 4pm, rest it for 2 hours and serve it for dinner at 6pm :)

What rub are you guys using? I've mainly just been using salt and pepper, but I was heavy handed with the salt this time and the brisket came out too salty.
CaptainCrash wrote:
Aug 7th, 2019 9:10 pm
I use the big Green egg. 260-275 is fine. Also I just use salt and pepper. More pepper than salt.
I also shoot for 260-270°F on my Kamado, I try to get it on by 5AM and it's normally wrapped at around 3PM and resting by 5PM (of course, it's dependent on a number of things, but generally speaking this is pretty close to where it ends up.) Some mistakes that have caught me in the past: My grate thermometer was too close to my brisket and the brisket shifted a bit during the cook and was immediately adjacent to the probe, it meant that the probe was reading low (which I didn't realize, so I opened up a bit more air and raised the temp,) as a result I spiked my temp (which I only spotted by looking at the dome thermometer when wandering around on my deck) to over 300°F for at least a couple of hours. The point was still good but the flat was definitely drier than it should have been. I've skipped the wrap a couple of times, and anything less than a "prime" brisket was again a wee bit drier than I'd prefer. God I love brisket, should go pull one from the chest freezer and put it on this weekend...
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Dec 19, 2006
486 posts
392 upvotes
Vancouver
enigma54 wrote:
Aug 7th, 2019 8:57 pm
I had two probes into the brisket and one for the grate and the numbers were consistent. I'm using a Kamado Joe and I used the heat deflectors, so technically it's indirect heat, but it's not an offset smoker which is what Franklin's uses in his book. So you guys are right and I think 275F or 265F is too high. I'll try next time at 225F or 235F. Ideally, I want to put it on at 9pm the night before, have the brisket hit 165F internal temp in the morning so I can wrap, and then have it hit 200F by 4pm, rest it for 2 hours and serve it for dinner at 6pm :)

What rub are you guys using? I've mainly just been using salt and pepper, but I was heavy handed with the salt this time and the brisket came out too salty.
I used an amazing ribs rub as well - their beef rub that you can find in their brisket recipe page. I dry brined mine 24h before I was going to start smoking. My brisket only took 13h to cook though it sat at 198F for an hour so I just took it off then. While you want to wrap at around 150-160F, that's only because that's the range around when the "stall" starts to happen. Mine stalled at about 148F so that's when I wrapped mine. If you wait until 165F to wrap that's a lot of time spent potentially stalling where it's basically losing moisture for no reason. You should wrap when you see that the meat hasn't increased even 1 degree in like 30min to an hour of smoking. That's the sign that the meat is starting to stall. Wrapping the brisket is to get past this range quickly, as well as semi braising the meat while it cooks.
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Jun 15, 2006
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ocisnicola wrote:
Aug 7th, 2019 10:12 pm
I used an amazing ribs rub as well - their beef rub that you can find in their brisket recipe page. I dry brined mine 24h before I was going to start smoking. My brisket only took 13h to cook though it sat at 198F for an hour so I just took it off then. While you want to wrap at around 150-160F, that's only because that's the range around when the "stall" starts to happen. Mine stalled at about 148F so that's when I wrapped mine. If you wait until 165F to wrap that's a lot of time spent potentially stalling where it's basically losing moisture for no reason. You should wrap when you see that the meat hasn't increased even 1 degree in like 30min to an hour of smoking. That's the sign that the meat is starting to stall. Wrapping the brisket is to get past this range quickly, as well as semi braising the meat while it cooks.
Will it develop enough bark if you wrap at 148F?

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