Investing

Couch potato investing for the last 14 years - tracking my progress

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  • Oct 20th, 2020 1:44 pm
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Deal Addict
Nov 9, 2013
3912 posts
3598 upvotes
Edmonton, AB
Germack wrote: NW: -11K YTD
Portfolio: -4% YTD

NWJULY2020.png
15 years and running strong - shows you the power of long term compounding. Way to stick with it!
Keep calm and go long
Newbie
Jun 7, 2017
7 posts
13 upvotes
I saved $200k in in last 5 years, Please suggest ti pay mortgage or investing . If investing please suggest some stocks / index funds. My background is 40 yrs old with 3 kids.
Sr. Member
Mar 4, 2008
537 posts
91 upvotes
BC
Trying to figure out what to put in my RRSP. I am 31 years old with $9,000 cash in the RRSP but working on maxing out my TFSA. So got another 20-30 years to go. I'm just lost on what the US witholding tax is all about. I only have 2 stocks ($6000 worth) invested in my TFSA, but willing to add some ETF's to the TFSA as well ($25,000 cash waiting to be invested)..waiting to see what happens in the next few months of the stock market...suggestions for RRSP?
Member
Jun 7, 2010
288 posts
79 upvotes
Techsavvy wrote: I saved $200k in in last 5 years, Please suggest ti pay mortgage or investing . If investing please suggest some stocks / index funds. My background is 40 yrs old with 3 kids.
JimboD wrote: Trying to figure out what to put in my RRSP. I am 31 years old with $9,000 cash in the RRSP but working on maxing out my TFSA. So got another 20-30 years to go. I'm just lost on what the US witholding tax is all about. I only have 2 stocks ($6000 worth) invested in my TFSA, but willing to add some ETF's to the TFSA as well ($25,000 cash waiting to be invested)..waiting to see what happens in the next few months of the stock market...suggestions for RRSP?
*

These questions are too rudimentary for this thread. I suggest that you go over to: https://canadiancouchpotato.com/ and read up all they have to understand passive investing (which is after all what @Germack here is doing).

If you rather not stare on a screen and want to read books on these topics, some of the easy-to-digest books are:

Millionaire Teacher (Passive Investing)
Beat the Bank (Passive Investing)
Wealthy Barber Returns (Passive Investing)
The Intelligent Investor By Benjamin Graham (Active/Dividend Investing)

If you are unable to do any of the above, look at a robo advisor or find a for-fee investing counsel (ensure they are CFP/CFA at the minimum) and follow their advise.

Instead of asking what to do, its best to plan something out based on your financial standing and personal circumstances and then ask the veterans here to critique your investment plan is a better use of this thread and our time.

Hope this helps.
Last edited by MrDisco on Aug 7th, 2020 9:43 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: quote was removed
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 1, 2006
2119 posts
1734 upvotes
Montreal
Techsavvy wrote: I saved $200k in in last 5 years, Please suggest ti pay mortgage or investing . If investing please suggest some stocks / index funds. My background is 40 yrs old with 3 kids.
Congratulations on saving $200k in 5 years. That's quite impressive. Why not do both?

For your investments I suggest to keep it simple and invest in one of the all-in one ETFs such as VBAL/VGRO depending on your risk tolerance.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 1, 2006
2119 posts
1734 upvotes
Montreal
JimboD wrote: Trying to figure out what to put in my RRSP. I am 31 years old with $9,000 cash in the RRSP but working on maxing out my TFSA. So got another 20-30 years to go. I'm just lost on what the US witholding tax is all about. I only have 2 stocks ($6000 worth) invested in my TFSA, but willing to add some ETF's to the TFSA as well ($25,000 cash waiting to be invested)..waiting to see what happens in the next few months of the stock market...suggestions for RRSP?
To learn more about withholding taxes have a look at the following link:
https://www.pwlcapital.com/wp-content/u ... linked.pdf

Do not try to time the market. It is likely not going to work. For the ETFs you can just go with one of the all-in one ETFs such as VBAL/VGRO. There is a lot of value in keeping things simple.
Sr. Member
Mar 4, 2008
537 posts
91 upvotes
BC
Germack wrote: To learn more about withholding taxes have a look at the following link:
https://www.pwlcapital.com/wp-content/u ... linked.pdf

Do not try to time the market. It is likely not going to work. For the ETFs you can just go with one of the all-in one ETFs such as VBAL/VGRO. There is a lot of value in keeping things simple.
Thanks Germack, I appreciate your response. I came across that article which was a good read.
Sr. Member
Oct 24, 2010
905 posts
683 upvotes
Ottawa
This is awesome.

I'm 36 and the wife is 31, and we've been following a couch potato strategy since 2014, the year before we were married. I've been bad about continually monitoring the growth, though, so I think I'm going to take a page from your playbook and start tracking our contributions and net worth monthly.

We're using a TD e-series portfolio for most of our investments, with the exceptions being my defined benefit pension plan and my wife's work plan (invested in a low MER cadence plan, which is what's available to her). I can track the transfer value of my pension to better reflect our net worth. We're sitting at about $510k excluding equity in our home, which adds an additional $200k or so.

March and April were a wild ride. I sure cringed as we saw it drop and the rise back up.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 1, 2006
2119 posts
1734 upvotes
Montreal
Dynatos wrote: This is awesome.

I'm 36 and the wife is 31, and we've been following a couch potato strategy since 2014, the year before we were married. I've been bad about continually monitoring the growth, though, so I think I'm going to take a page from your playbook and start tracking our contributions and net worth monthly.

We're using a TD e-series portfolio for most of our investments, with the exceptions being my defined benefit pension plan and my wife's work plan (invested in a low MER cadence plan, which is what's available to her). I can track the transfer value of my pension to better reflect our net worth. We're sitting at about $510k excluding equity in our home, which adds an additional $200k or so.

March and April were a wild ride. I sure cringed as we saw it drop and the rise back up.
Good luck with your investments Dynatos. Yes, March, April was crazy, but in the end it all turned out well. In times like this it is very important to stick to your plan.

Jason Zweig said it well, investing is not an IQ test. It is a test of character.
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Member
User avatar
Jul 24, 2014
285 posts
100 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Germack wrote: Good luck with your investments Dynatos. Yes, March, April was crazy, but in the end it all turned out well. In times like this it is very important to stick to your plan.

Jason Zweig said it well, investing is not an IQ test. It is a test of character.
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Very good point. The last sentence especially
Index Fund vs Individual Stock..."tigerdemi is a great man" tigerdemi said to himself in his dream.
Newbie
Feb 27, 2020
2 posts
2 upvotes
Germack wrote: Good luck with your investments Dynatos. Yes, March, April was crazy, but in the end it all turned out well. In times like this it is very important to stick to your plan.

Jason Zweig said it well, investing is not an IQ test. It is a test of character.

Return.png
I do my investing with TDDI and have been doing the couch potato investing since 2015 (using VXC, VCN and VAB), and it always pisses me off seeing that unhedged SP500 TR index benchmark (the orange dotted line) completely obliterating my CCP portfolio:P. Although I know its irrational, it always makes me wonder why I simply don't put all my money in into an unhedged SP500 ETF; since 2015 or so, its outgained my portfolio almost 2:1.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Nov 19, 2002
12021 posts
377 upvotes
GillesVilleneuve wrote: I do my investing with TDDI and have been doing the couch potato investing since 2015 (using VXC, VCN and VAB), and it always pisses me off seeing that unhedged SP500 TR index benchmark (the orange dotted line) completely obliterating my CCP portfolio:P. Although I know its irrational, it always makes me wonder why I simply don't put all my money in into an unhedged SP500 ETF; since 2015 or so, its outgained my portfolio almost 2:1.
Since 2010, my time weighted return has been around 120% across all my accounts. Feels pretty good.

SP500 has been 335%. FFFFFFFFFF....

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