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Crown Moulding Dilemma

  • Last Updated:
  • May 29th, 2021 7:43 pm
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[OP]
Member
Jul 31, 2017
337 posts
361 upvotes
Toronto

Crown Moulding Dilemma

I need to work out how to handle this corner with crown moulding.
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Not only is it an angled corner, but the return above the door is curved. Is it best to just terminate at the corner and not put the crown above the door. The crown ends after that short run anyway as it will be hitting a brick wall so it won't look as odd as it could. I don't think there is enough material to cope out to get a decent fit. Even terminating at the corner is going to give me a headache as I struggle to get tight joints anyway, let alone an angled return on the end! I assume I just play with scraps until i get the right angles?

Any and all advice gratefully received!
11 replies
Deal Addict
Jun 26, 2019
1413 posts
1143 upvotes
GTA
What will it look like when it's flat against the ceiling? If there is a small gap at the bottom you could always put another small piece of trim or may a 1/4x1/4 or some small piece to fill that gap.

I think I need a bit more details. Having a hard time seeing where it ends and what you mean.

For corners I would use a starrett angle finder and that will give you what you need right away or get you pretty close then you can fine tune it. For an outside corner like that I would usually glue it and pin it before nailing it in place. You have to lift 2 pieces but if it's smaller it should be fine.
[OP]
Member
Jul 31, 2017
337 posts
361 upvotes
Toronto
This is held roughly in the right alignment for a standard wall
188888506_493565445196701_1353445720942251352_n.jpg
You can see that the wall falls away from the trim edge leaving a triangular gap. I'd have to rip a wedge shape to fill the gap and then caulk it. I suppose it's doable but i fear it will look kludged.
Sr. Member
Jan 21, 2011
810 posts
334 upvotes
GTA
If you can rip off the two back edges of crown moulding, it might just work without damaging the front. This might mess with the other two adjoining pieces though.
[OP]
Member
Jul 31, 2017
337 posts
361 upvotes
Toronto
lamin wrote: If you can rip off the two back edges of crown moulding, it might just work without damaging the front. This might mess with the other two adjoining pieces though.
That's a really ass puckering cut on the table saw though!
Deal Addict
Jun 26, 2019
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BoatyMcBoatface wrote: This is held roughly in the right alignment for a standard wall

You can see that the wall falls away from the trim edge leaving a triangular gap. I'd have to rip a wedge shape to fill the gap and then caulk it. I suppose it's doable but i fear it will look kludged.
Whenever I have a big gap that's way too much to caulk, I always add in more trim. It can just be a square piece or something simple, but you just add it on to the bottom so it looks like another step in the profile.

This said, when you go around the corner you'll transition from needing the bottom piece to not needing it. So would have to figure out how that works.

On the reverse side, you could add a piece of trim to build out the top and bring the bottom lower down on the curve. Would make more work for the whole room, but this in conjunction with trimming a bit off the back may give you the best and most uniform look around the room.

I think the first step is to trim off the back of the profile to see how close you can get it.
Deal Addict
Jun 26, 2019
1413 posts
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GTA
BoatyMcBoatface wrote: That's a really ass puckering cut on the table saw though!
As with all things crown, I would use a jig saw or an angle grinder with a flap disc.
Deal Addict
Jun 26, 2019
1413 posts
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GTA
Also could use a router table, dado stack or just multiple passes on the table saw to take off the material with the crown flat on its back.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 18, 2005
5012 posts
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Kitchener
Does it fit better if you flip it?
Sr. Member
Jan 21, 2011
810 posts
334 upvotes
GTA
Even a sander will work. If you are careful, a sharp knife would work too.

What is wall material made of?
Last edited by lamin on May 29th, 2021 7:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
[OP]
Member
Jul 31, 2017
337 posts
361 upvotes
Toronto
SubjectivelyObjective wrote: Also could use a router table, dado stack or just multiple passes on the table saw to take off the material with the crown flat on its back.
Actually a dado stack might work a treat, i can creep up on the fit easier. I'll experiment with a piece about 12" before i destroy a full length.
Thanks!
Sr. Member
Jan 7, 2013
776 posts
433 upvotes
Oshawa, Ontario
Can you just cut the curve off the corner of the wall? It'll be covered anyways

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