Travel

Cruise Ships Banned in Venice

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 19th, 2019 3:07 pm
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May 29, 2006
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they will just hop on the train and go to venice from the port. the train takes you right to the canals anyways.
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Jun 1, 2006
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Shouldn't be a problem because lots of cruise terminals around the world are not within the city. Take example Rome, the cruise terminal is actually in another city, far from the main attractions of Rome.
Have a nice day!


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May 10, 2005
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LonesomeDove wrote: Shouldn't be a problem because lots of cruise terminals around the world are not within the city. Take example Rome, the cruise terminal are actually in another city, far from the main attractions of Rome.
No one said getting into the city was a problem. Florence is another stop that has a long transit from the port (Livorno).
Venitians (Italy) are just doing something they have talked about for decades. The damage caused by these ships is becoming irrepairable and has to be halted.
Venice (Italy) is now taking advice from the Dutch and is trying to control the waters in and around the lagoon. The Dutch have saved and even increased the size of their Country with their technologies in water management. Venice needs the help, it is still sinking as the water levels are rising.
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Jun 15, 2015
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I don’t think the original article is correct- I’ve seen some local news articles in Italian post otherwise (found this in English):

https://www.thelocal.it/20190810/no-ven ... its-lagoon

...nothing set in stone yet.

It’s true that it would take time to upgrade the infrastructure of the ports further away. And that too would take time and money (which Italy doesn’t have).
I wouldn’t be surprised for a complete ban that causes the ships to dock much further away (similar to ports like Livorno). MSC and Costa have exclusive rights to some Italian ports- wouldn’t be surprised if something similar transpires with Venice.
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Jul 7, 2017
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LonesomeDove wrote: Shouldn't be a problem because lots of cruise terminals around the world are not within the city. Take example Rome, the cruise terminal is actually in another city, far from the main attractions of Rome.
Yep. Who ever would have thought Berlin, Kyoto, Petra, Santiago, Kuala Lumpur, Beijing to name but a few would be ocean-going cruise ship ports?
I smile when I see container ships sailing past my house laden with stuff made in China
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Pete_Coach wrote: It has been spoken about for decades. When you turn a city into an tourist economy, you need to be careful how you treat the people feeding your economy and livelihood. The shops selling to those cruise ship passengers will argue that they do not spend money when on day trips and the ships doing overnights have many passengers eating and drinking onshore.
Having been to Venice a number of times, on cruise stops as well as on day trips and land vacations, I can be pretty sure to say that the cruise ship passengers are more numerous than land based tourists and that they spend an awful lot o money in their short stays.

Locals have not been able to live in Venice for 50 years or more. Most homes have been turn into hotels and B&B's and even trattorias for decades. "Since about 20 million tourists pour in each year - 55,000 a day - it's a safe bet that most days there are now more tourists than locals in Venice."
...and probably will still take them another few years.

Cruise ship passengers are high in volume -but given how easy it is to come and go from the ship in Venice they do not spend a great deal on (what many consider “overpriced”) food and beverage. A vast majority of ships are for the day and need the passengers to be back on board well before the Italian dinner hours. I’m not saying that every single cruise ship passenger does this - but realistically how much food can you consume if you likely had breakfast on board and want to maximize your hours in port to sightsee? Sure, there are ships that overnight but the majority do not. You can spend the day walking around in Venice and spend next to nothing if you wanted.

I’ve been to the area in the dead of winter in the middle of knee deep flooding (no cruiseships) and there’s still people around. Even without the cruise ship passengers between overnight guests in Venice and those staying on the outskirts - and with those passing through by rail or on tours business will still thrive because ...........it’s Venice. The political mentality in Italy currently is a “Italians first” mindset. There are other areas in Italy far more seasonal of a destination then Venice and locals/politicians have protested additional cruise ship infrastructure because they DO NOT want the cruise ship tourists because it’s not a cash cow (Sicilia - La Spezia - Genoa - Pescara are all good examples).
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Feb 1, 2005
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niche54 wrote: In the overall scheme of things, this won't change much for Venice. Few people on a cruise around Italy is going to skip Venice because they docked 5 km away. Also, how many tourist spending thousands of dollars to go to Italy won't pay a nominal tourism fee to enter one of its most famous cities? But I suppose even a few % drop in tourism numbers would bring some relief. I realize that some vendors will be negatively affected but I think it should be an overall positive direction for the city.
LonesomeDove wrote: Shouldn't be a problem because lots of cruise terminals around the world are not within the city. Take example Rome, the cruise terminal is actually in another city, far from the main attractions of Rome.
IMHO, the allure of the cruise stop in Venice is the SAIL-IN and SAIL-OUT along the canal. It appears that is going to disappear.

The cruise ship restrictions may not affect overall visitors to Venice, but for me at least, a cruise stop there is much less appealing now. I'd rather do a cruise without Venice and add Venice as a land stay even if it takes a few hours by train from Rome.
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ShopperfiendTO wrote: IMHO, the allure of the cruise stop in Venice is the SAIL-IN and SAIL-OUT along the canal. It appears that is going to disappear.

The cruise ship restrictions may not affect overall visitors to Venice, but for me at least, a cruise stop there is much less appealing now. I'd rather do a cruise without Venice and add Venice as a land stay even if it takes a few hours by train from Rome.
That will benefit Venice much than the cruise ships coming and going.
I smile when I see container ships sailing past my house laden with stuff made in China
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Apr 4, 2001
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iEyeCaptain wrote: What is the carbon footprint of 4,000 passengers travelling individually on roads instead?
That's like the airplane comparison.

The problem is, people wouldn't drive to Venice from Toronto. They only do it because someone else enabled it.

People who care about the environment are not taking flights or cruise ships, nor are they driving long distances on a regular basis.
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rocking23nf wrote: they will just hop on the train and go to venice from the port. the train takes you right to the canals anyways.
From the cruise port on the mainland you will take a bus to Piazzale Roma. To catch a train you need to get into Mestre and then take a train, hopefully one will come along.
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Jul 26, 2007
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BrunetteGirl wrote: ^ molti animali!

I can’t think of any other place on earth (tourist attraction) with that many people confined in such a small space. Times Square?
at least I can make a fairly quick exit out of Times Square (unless it's on NYE or something big).

Venice? I have to snake through their labyrinth roads to even get back to the bus station. Don't see what people like about Venice. I think out of 29 countries and many more cities, it's easily the worst place I've been to so far and you couldn't pay me to go back there.
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Clement wrote: at least I can make a fairly quick exit out of Times Square (unless it's on NYE or something big).

Venice? I have to snake through their labyrinth roads to even get back to the bus station. Don't see what people like about Venice. I think out of 29 countries and many more cities, it's easily the worst place I've been to so far and you couldn't pay me to go back there.
Most love it, a few do not. It is all what you are looking for.
Venice is the 2nd most visited city in Italy.
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Jun 23, 2010
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I’m amazed with only a population of 26OK people they have enough pull to pull this off. I don’t know who here have been to Venice but we where there for a week before we pulled out on a Cruise from that very same dock, I swear theres nothing to do there really, food is subpar in comparison with Rome, tons of souvenir shops selling lame masks, over priced gelato, counterfeit mirano glass, etc. I would think in the interest of their economy they would tolerate the tourism as the entire region is driven by tourism and only during the prime summer months.
Making it inconvenient getting in and out if there, will turn people off. We fortunately were in Rome for a week and we took a great train ride there. That was a nice ride
I’m glad I went there once but I will never go back
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PCUSER wrote: I’m amazed with only a population of 26OK people they have enough pull to pull this off.
I.......
We fortunately were in Rome for a week and we took a great train ride there. That was a nice ride
I’m glad I went there once but I will never go back
I am quite sure it is not just the people of Venice. The city (118 islands) have been in trouble form the seas for hundreds of years. It has gotten worse over the last 40 or so years. The cost to the government for stabilizing is enormous so, finally, one of the causes is being eliminated. This cause costs little to eliminate.
To stabilize the city, as is being done now, will be a very long term and hugely expensive task and eliminating any extraneous causes are a wise move.
Whether you like the city or not is really immaterial. Enough of the world do so preservation is very important to Italy as well as to , of course, Venice proper and the entire lagoon region..

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