Computers & Electronics

Cutting the home phone cord. Can you port/forward your home line to an existing cell?

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  • Jan 27th, 2020 10:45 am
[OP]
Sr. Member
Aug 16, 2005
664 posts
86 upvotes

Cutting the home phone cord. Can you port/forward your home line to an existing cell?

All,
To those who cut the home phone cord, I would still like to keep my number if possible. what are my options?
I'm with rogers now and will probably cut cable too.

Thanks in advance ,
Mark
33 replies
Deal Addict
Jan 28, 2009
1948 posts
466 upvotes
Calgary
You can, but why? Are you concerned that the telemarketers won't be able to find you anymore?

Give family/friends your new number.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Aug 16, 2005
664 posts
86 upvotes
canehdianman wrote: You can, but why? Are you concerned that the telemarketers won't be able to find you anymore?

Give family/friends your new number.
I guess. but what are my options if I do still want to have one?
Deal Addict
Jan 28, 2009
1948 posts
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Calgary
I guess your best option is to port the number to a VOIP service that is cheap and forward it to your cell.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Aug 16, 2005
664 posts
86 upvotes
Thanks again for the response. Any suggestions on a cheap voip?
Deal Addict
Jan 21, 2018
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You can port your phone number to your cell service, but I'm guessing you have an existing cell number and you want to keep it?

You could port your home phone number to Fongo or Freephoneline (owned by Fongo). Porting costs a one-time fee of $25 (same as most companies). They both allow phone forwarding, so you could forward your old home phone number to your cell phone, But maybe you don't want to do that (telemareters, like canehdianman said), and you would rather use voicemail - also free with Fongo/Freephoneline. Normally Fongo/Freephoneline cancel your free assigned number and account after 90 days if you don't make any outgoing calls, but that doesn't apply if you pay to port in your own number.
Newbie
Jan 19, 2007
94 posts
83 upvotes
Toronto
You can port to your cellphone but will lose your cell number as stated. Or port to an old cell phone if you have one on a pay as you go yearly plan - like $100 per year with Rogers through retention- if you want to keep the number active and still have your cell number. Or port to Telus home phone if you want it like a landline but much more inexpensive.
http://forums.redflagdeals.com/port-40- ... e-2325715/
Last edited by Tiger_paws on Dec 17th, 2019 12:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Nov 28, 2016
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Just in the process of doing this now. Was wanting to keep my old number, its easy to remember and have had it for 18 years. But then again, the home phone barely rings anymore since I got a free block feature for telemarketers. Even now I give my cell becaue day time calls at home makes no sense since I am not home

Its time to just move on, for the people that still have it we barely get called anyway. Save myself $11 a month, and everyone in the house has a cell phone now. We kept it for our youngest since he didnt have a cell phone, and there was an emergency. But no point now

We even we did our kitchen tile, and the old phone port we left live in the wall but covered up. It was an eye sore there anyway

Edit: Just called and they are lowering it to $5 a month now. They must really want people to keep these lines.
Newbie
Dec 15, 2019
8 posts
6 upvotes
markdweasel wrote: All,
To those who cut the home phone cord, I would still like to keep my number if possible. what are my options?
I'm with rogers now and will probably cut cable too.

Thanks in advance ,
Mark
What I always suggested for all my previous clients was to add it into a data only line, pay as you go or a wireless home phone which is alot cheaper then a actual home phone line. & for pay as you go and data lines they're always month to month and you can just stop paying whenever you wanna let that line go!
[OP]
Sr. Member
Aug 16, 2005
664 posts
86 upvotes
Thank you everyone. Great info.
Much appreciated.

Mark
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Apr 25, 2013
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Porting your number to a $20/month unlimited Chatr plan is the cheapest way, it even cheaper than a BHell landline that running for $41/month these days !
If you don't get a lot or make alot of phone calls then a pay as you go plan is the better option which can cost as less as $20/year.

I only would suggest a VoIP option as an addition to a cellphone plan if you're more technically inclined as it has limitations and reliability issues that a cellphone plan does not.
With a sole VoIP option you have to have a physical internet or WiFi connection in order to receive and send calls. With a cellphone plan your home phone number follows you wherever you go, no need to stay home to wait for a call !
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Mar 14, 2017
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Why not 7-Eleven Speakout? You can fill the account for just $25/year and it's good for a year.
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XeniaOnatopp wrote: Why not 7-Eleven Speakout? You can fill the account for just $25/year and it's good for a year.
Yes, the 7-Eleven plan is the cheapest option in Canada followed by Petro-Canada's. It depends if the OP receives or makes many calls and how long does he jabber on every call to make a pay-as-you-go plan like 7-Eleven to be viable.
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Aug 22, 2006
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EdT586 wrote: Porting your number to a $20/month unlimited Chatr plan is the cheapest way, it even cheaper than a BHell landline that running for $41/month these days !
$20/month? I pay less than $20/year for lesser used numbers.
Technically about $13.50/year plus usage.
If you don't get a lot or make alot of phone calls then a pay as you go plan is the better option which can cost as less as $20/year.
This is better but you're still stuck with 2 separate devices.
I only would suggest a VoIP option as an addition to a cellphone plan if you're more technically inclined as it has limitations and reliability issues that a cellphone plan does not.
I'm not entirely sure what VoIP company you've used in the past, but I've had FAR more reliability issues with cell phones than I ever had with VoIP.
There are technical issues with something like short code SMS that VoIP still has, but this would be true with a landline too.
A cell phone would definitely fix this, but that's not worth a ridiculous amount a month especially if you already have a cell phone.

As for being technically inclined, If you can fill in a web form, you can start using VoIP.
With a sole VoIP option you have to have a physical internet or WiFi connection in order to receive and send calls.
Only if you actually plan on having on premise equipment. There's a few ways to leverage VoIP without having an internet connection.

The most obvious for incoming calls is to port your number to a VoIP provider and just forward calls to your cell.
To me this is the most optimal scenario for a lesser used number because there's no equipment to buy, the setup is entirely web based, and it's pretty cheap to maintain a number.
The only downside I mentioned above is the SMS short codes, but if you're forwarding to a cell already, you have that "fixed"

Outgoing gets a touch more complicated but you can relatively easily setup what's called a DISA where you dial your own number, recognizes your caller ID, and gives you a traditional dialtone to dial out.
This sounds daunting to set up, but once it's done it's done "forever". Follow one guide and you're good.
Take your cell, "call yourself", and get a dialtone.

Both of these basically run solely on PSTN on your end with your VoIP provider handling the VoIP part. No internet required.

With a cellphone plan your home phone number follows you wherever you go, no need to stay home to wait for a call !
Only if you
1) Take 2 phones with you
2) Forward your calls to your existing cell phone

1 means 2 devices which I already have enough junk.
2 you may as well just use VoIP and pay $1.13/month as opposed to even someone like Speakout that's $25/year.
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death_hawk wrote: $20/month? I pay less than $20/year for lesser used numbers.
Technically about $13.50/year plus usage.
Yes, I also mentioned an option for lesser used numbers !
death_hawk wrote: This is better but you're still stuck with 2 separate devices.
No idea what you're your talking about, its either a fixed monthly rate or a pay as you go cellphone plan, still one smartphone or device !
death_hawk wrote: I'm not entirely sure what VoIP company you've used in the past, but I've had FAR more reliability issues with cell phones than I ever had with VoIP.
There are technical issues with something like short code SMS that VoIP still has, but this would be true with a landline too.
A cell phone would definitely fix this, but that's not worth a ridiculous amount a month especially if you already have a cell phone.
Oh ...I guess you forgot about spending more for an ATA box or an IP Phone and then configuring those as well or power failures and being stuck at home requiring a internet connection ...oh wait now you need an UPS another expense to power the modem, router and ATA boxes during a power failure as well !
death_hawk wrote: As for being technically inclined, If you can fill in a web form, you can start using VoIP.
Sure, more costly prepackaged VoIP plans at $9.95, $14.95, and $24.95 per month making them more expensive than the $20/month unlimited cellphone plans which the OP we still need a separate cellphone plan.
death_hawk wrote: Only if you actually plan on having on premise equipment. There's a few ways to leverage VoIP without having an internet connection.

The most obvious for incoming calls is to port your number to a VoIP provider and just forward calls to your cell.
To me this is the most optimal scenario for a lesser used number because there's no equipment to buy, the setup is entirely web based, and it's pretty cheap to maintain a number.
The only downside I mentioned above is the SMS short codes, but if you're forwarding to a cell already, you have that "fixed"

Outgoing gets a touch more complicated but you can relatively easily setup what's called a DISA where you dial your own number, recognizes your caller ID, and gives you a traditional dialtone to dial out.
This sounds daunting to set up, but once it's done it's done "forever". Follow one guide and you're good.
Take your cell, "call yourself", and get a dialtone.

Both of these basically run solely on PSTN on your end with your VoIP provider handling the VoIP part. No internet required.
Forwarding your number to your cell is an added cost you pay for both the call time and forwarding time which is doubled the cost ...unless the OP has a fixed VoIP business number why have the hassle of of paying more when he can receive the call straight on his cellphone ?
death_hawk wrote: Only if you
1) Take 2 phones with you
2) Forward your calls to your existing cell phone

1 means 2 devices which I already have enough junk.
2 you may as well just use VoIP and pay $1.13/month as opposed to even someone like Speakout that's $25/year.
Huh ...what the heck are you talking about ? The OP just need his home phone number ported as his cellphone number why does he need two devices ? ...and if he does need to two separate cellphone numbers, most smartphones have double SIM slots !

Dude I do this on a professional basis consulting for businesses to save money on their telecommunication costs. Most telemarketing companies I have consulted have saved from their $3000/month bill to just under $60/month !
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EdT586 wrote: No idea what you're your talking about, its either a fixed montly rate or a pay as you go cellphone plan, still one smartphone or device !
OP has a cell phone.
Another PAYG cell plan requires another cell phone, hence 2 devices.
My solution involves no extra devices.
Oh ...I guess you forgot about spending more for an ATA box or an IP Phone and then configuring those as well or power failures and being stuck at home requiring a internet connection ...oh wait now you need an UPS another expense to power the modem, router and ATA boxes during a power failure as well !
I guess you forgot to read that my solution requires no ATA/IP phone or any on premise equipment or even active internet for that matter.
The VoIP provider is forwarding incoming calls to your cell phone.
Outgoing calls are handled via DISA.
Sure, more costly prepackaged VoIP plans at $9.95, $14.95, and $24.95 per month making them more expensive than the $20/month unlimited cellphone plans which the OP we still need a separate cellphone plan.
I'm not entirely sure who you're going with but voip.ms is a whopping $0.85USD per month plus usage.
Usage is $0.005/minute. If you're using your phone for more than 3500 minutes per month, your deal makes much more sense but I don't think anyone nowadays is spending 3500 minutes on the phone per month.
Technically 1750 if you're forwarding but even then....
Forwarding your number to your cell is an added cost you pay for both the call time and forwarding time which is doubled the cost ...unless the OP has a fixed VoIP business number why have the hassle of of paying more when he can recieve the call straight on his cellphone ?
For $20/month.
If OP doesn't use 1750 minutes or more per month, my solution comes out cheaper than practically everyone.
Actually if OP is in Ontario, FPL is even cheaper since there's no recurring charge at all.
I just chose voip.ms because I care about latency due to being in BC and I don't mind paying extra for the additional features of a practically full blown PBX that I don't have to manage.
Huh ...what the heck are you talking about ? The OP just need his home phone number ported as his cellphone number why does he need two devices ?
I assumed OP wanted to retain their existing cell phone number necessitating a secondary device because you can't have 2 numbers on one SIM.
If OP doesn't want to retain their existing cell number then yes, you are correct. OP only needs one device.
...and if he does need to two seperate cellphone numbers, most smartphones have double SIM slots !
Some? Maybe.
Most? Not a chance.
The only devices I own that have multiple SIM slots are Chinese phones and I certainly wouldn't be using this as a daily driver.
Most devices being sold domestically have one SIM slot.
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EdT586 wrote: Yes, I also mentioned an option for lesser used numbers !



No idea what you're your talking about, its either a fixed monthly rate or a pay as you go cellphone plan, still one smartphone or device !



Oh ...I guess you forgot about spending more for an ATA box or an IP Phone and then configuring those as well or power failures and being stuck at home requiring a internet connection ...oh wait now you need an UPS another expense to power the modem, router and ATA boxes during a power failure as well !



Sure, more costly prepackaged VoIP plans at $9.95, $14.95, and $24.95 per month making them more expensive than the $20/month unlimited cellphone plans which the OP we still need a separate cellphone plan.



Forwarding your number to your cell is an added cost you pay for both the call time and forwarding time which is doubled the cost ...unless the OP has a fixed VoIP business number why have the hassle of of paying more when he can receive the call straight on his cellphone ?



Huh ...what the heck are you talking about ? The OP just need his home phone number ported as his cellphone number why does he need two devices ? ...and if he does need to two separate cellphone numbers, most smartphones have double SIM slots !

Dude I do this on a professional basis consulting for businesses to save money on their telecommunication costs. Most telemarketing companies I have consulted have saved from their $3000/month bill to just under $60/month !
For all this hassle, why even bother trying to save your number. Move on, its called change. Just get rid of it, This sounds like a lot work for 7 random calls a year
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death_hawk wrote: OP has a cell phone.
Another PAYG cell plan requires another cell phone, hence 2 devices.
My solution involves no extra devices.
OMFG ...why does he need another cellphone plan if he just needs to port his home number to his existing cellphone number ?
death_hawk wrote: I guess you forgot to read that my solution requires no ATA/IP phone or any on premise equipment or even active internet for that matter.
The VoIP provider is forwarding incoming calls to your cell phone.
Outgoing calls are handled via DISA.
So pay for a VoIP service when he does not need it ? ...oh very smart, economical and efficient ! ...LoL
death_hawk wrote: I'm not entirely sure who you're going with but voip.ms is a whopping $0.85USD per month plus usage.
Usage is $0.005/minute. If you're using your phone for more than 3500 minutes per month, your deal makes much more sense but I don't think anyone nowadays is spending 3500 minutes on the phone per month.
Technically 1750 if you're forwarding but even then....
Why does the OP need to pay for VoIP setup if he has and already paying for an existing cellphone plan ?
death_hawk wrote: For $20/month.
If OP doesn't use 1750 minutes or more per month, my solution comes out cheaper than practically everyone.
Actually if OP is in Ontario, FPL is even cheaper since there's no recurring charge at all.
I just chose voip.ms because I care about latency due to being in BC and I don't mind paying extra for the additional features of a practically full blown PBX that I don't have to manage.
Your thinking is he still needs to pay for a separate VoIP plan and a separate cellphone plan ..why not just pay for one and skip the hassle in between !
death_hawk wrote: I assumed OP wanted to retain their existing cell phone number necessitating a secondary device because you can't have 2 numbers on one SIM.
If OP doesn't want to retain their existing cell number then yes, you are correct. OP only needs one device.


Some? Maybe.
Most? Not a chance.
The only devices I own that have multiple SIM slots are Chinese phones and I certainly wouldn't be using this as a daily driver.
Most devices being sold domestically have one SIM slot.
If the OP wants to port his home line to his cellphone, I don't think he wants a seperate cellphone account as well even that is doable with my suggestion of a double SIM smartphone !
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WikkiWikki wrote: For all this hassle, why even bother trying to save your number. Move on, its called change. Just get rid of it, This sounds like a lot work for 7 random calls a year
Maybe his long lost brother might be one of those seven calls trying to reach him because his number was in the book for so long !
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EdT586 wrote: Maybe his long lost brother might be one of those seven calls trying to reach him because his number was in the book for so long !
Well maybe if they kept in touch then that wouldnt be an issue. Keeping a number for just in case for a maybe phone call 5 years down the road. If its important, that person will find your new info

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