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Cyber security - TN - Canadian looking for US jobs

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  • Jul 31st, 2020 12:38 am
[OP]
Member
Apr 25, 2019
204 posts
78 upvotes

Cyber security - TN - Canadian looking for US jobs

Live in Toronto, Canada but have been trying for jobs in the US and wanted some opinion.

1) It seems like end clients/enterprises are not interested in TN applications however tech manufacturers and consulting companies respond.

2) The recruiter sounds super excited but when we start discussing about TN visa then their tone goes down. Note that I already have written on my resume in big bold red color that Canadian looking for US jobs on TN Visa. Based on the phone conversation it did sound like they are fully aware of what TN is and I was told they have done TN in the past too for other candidates. It seemed like they did not had a good experience with TN candidates, why? I dont know.

3) Did a technical interview with consulting company and managing consultant was super excited and a week later got the email we decided not to move forward. I emailed the managing consultant who told me that he pushed really hard but senior management does not want anyone non-US citizen. Wonder why they interviewed me, also in the job description they did not mention a US citizen required.

4) I have been trying since December so COVID factor isn't the only one here. Most jobs are 85-90% match on my profile but they just reject me without even a screening call.

5) One tech manufacturer from the threat intel industry talked to me. The recruiter felt my CV is solid but then again when we came to TN point her motivation dropped. Usually the requirement is to be in US any location so I told her Buffalo is around 100-150 km and it shoulnt take long to find accommodation. She told me so we have a preferred list of candidates which came in from references who are first priority and my file was below. If thats the case why would she even call me to discuss salary and other BS stuff. Said she will come back to me next week but did not , they still havnt filled in that position.


Has anyone been in a similar boat? Please share any tips which can be helpful.
12 replies
Deal Addict
Jan 1, 2017
1080 posts
918 upvotes
If you are in cyber security don’t you have a NAFTA qualified degree to get a visa under it?
[OP]
Member
Apr 25, 2019
204 posts
78 upvotes
ProductGuy wrote: If you are in cyber security don’t you have a NAFTA qualified degree to get a visa under it?
I have a degree and I am qualified for TN. But first the employer has to provide an offer letter.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 7, 2007
3548 posts
1348 upvotes
Just remember that even if a posting matches your profile doesn't mean they are going to call you right away. Just be patient and keep trying.

USA unemployment rate is around 11.1 percent, so a lot of people are looking for a job down there. This situation usually "clogs" the pipe.

Here in Canada, I hear through the grapevine that HR at my company is dealing with 100s of candidates for each IT job.... so even if your profile fits, there is someone else that probably fits a bit better.... or is cheaper.
Member
Jan 12, 2011
205 posts
132 upvotes
Toronto
I think you're underestimating the risks associated with getting TN without a proper immigration attorney and supporting paperwork. If the company doesn't have experience with this before, of course they are going to go with the less risky route and hire local americans.
Deal Addict
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Mar 3, 2011
3064 posts
17835 upvotes
Your best bet is to work with a company that has office locations and space in the US and then relocate to the other office. It’s a roundabout way of doing things but know a few people who have successfully done this but could be your ticket in.
Deal Addict
Apr 21, 2014
2182 posts
966 upvotes
Alberta
cnfjti3 wrote: I think you're underestimating the risks associated with getting TN without a proper immigration attorney and supporting paperwork. If the company doesn't have experience with this before, of course they are going to go with the less risky route and hire local americans.
Not really. I did it myself. All I needed from the company was the job offer letter which they provided, and I typed up a Tn support letter which they reviewed and signed. Went to the border and got it stamped and crossed over.
[OP]
Member
Apr 25, 2019
204 posts
78 upvotes
abc123yyz wrote: Not really. I did it myself. All I needed from the company was the job offer letter which they provided, and I typed up a Tn support letter which they reviewed and signed. Went to the border and got it stamped and crossed over.
Did you do it for CSA category? Can I private message you?
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User avatar
Mar 7, 2007
3548 posts
1348 upvotes
abc123yyz wrote: Not really. I did it myself. All I needed from the company was the job offer letter which they provided, and I typed up a Tn support letter which they reviewed and signed. Went to the border and got it stamped and crossed over.
Sure. Plenty of people did it like that. But the question is, when did you do it? Was the pandemic around?

The point the other poster was trying to make is that you have to make it easier for the employer, if not, they'll just go with some one else. For the employer, the simpler, less costly candidate is sometimes the best one.
Member
Jan 12, 2011
205 posts
132 upvotes
Toronto
abc123yyz wrote: Not really. I did it myself. All I needed from the company was the job offer letter which they provided, and I typed up a Tn support letter which they reviewed and signed. Went to the border and got it stamped and crossed over.
Nothing you said there indicates that there is no risk for the company to hire you over an american.

They need to trust that you did enough thorough research to know what exactly to put down on the letter, to have original diplomas and transcripts with you during crossing, to answer very specific questions like how long you intend to stay properly, to know which border crossings are good and which to avoid, to have your future manager ready and knowledgeable if CBP decides to call, to trust that the border officer isn't having a bad day even, etc.

Just because it went through smoothly for you doesn't mean it's smooth for everyone else. Do a quick google search and you'll get plenty of rejection/denial stories to sift through.
Deal Addict
Apr 21, 2014
2182 posts
966 upvotes
Alberta
motomondo wrote: Sure. Plenty of people did it like that. But the question is, when did you do it? Was the pandemic around?

The point the other poster was trying to make is that you have to make it easier for the employer, if not, they'll just go with some one else. For the employer, the simpler, less costly candidate is sometimes the best one.
I did it in 2017 and the company that brought me over arranged most of the paperwork did the crossing at Edmonton International airport. It was for a 1 year TN. When that was expiring, working for same company and did a 3 year at YYZ. Then near the end of 2018 that Company was bought and they told us it was going to close in about 3-4 months. I started looking around for a job, and got one in the same city with another employer. I had the TN support letter from my first job and just modified it, had the new company sign it. I drove over to the Vancouver border, stayed a few days I’m Vancouver and did it at Peach Arch (I think that’s the name) crossing.

I’m also a CPA, so not trying to get in under management consultant or anything like that. Those are the ones that get denied the most because people think it’s the “catch all bucket”.

So
1) YEG - Edmonton international
2) YYZ - Pearson international
3) Peace Arch - land crossing

Oh and I know this shouldn’t matter, but since systemic racism does exist. I am South Asian.
Deal Addict
Apr 21, 2014
2182 posts
966 upvotes
Alberta
dentonic88 wrote: Did you do it for CSA category? Can I private message you?
I am a CPA (accounting classification).
Deal Addict
Apr 21, 2014
2182 posts
966 upvotes
Alberta
cnfjti3 wrote: Nothing you said there indicates that there is no risk for the company to hire you over an american.

They need to trust that you did enough thorough research to know what exactly to put down on the letter, to have original diplomas and transcripts with you during crossing, to answer very specific questions like how long you intend to stay properly, to know which border crossings are good and which to avoid, to have your future manager ready and knowledgeable if CBP decides to call, to trust that the border officer isn't having a bad day even, etc.

Just because it went through smoothly for you doesn't mean it's smooth for everyone else. Do a quick google search and you'll get plenty of rejection/denial stories to sift through.
I agree all things being equal the US citizen or permanent residents will obviously have an advantage. So if you are competing against them you will most likely lose unless you bring something unique to the table.

I would suggest to the OP to not look in major markets. You are up against much more competition. Look into mid size cities like Columbus, Cincinnati, Reno, Lubbock etc etc. If you have a lot of good experience you can stand out vs the locals.

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