Expired Hot Deals

[Amazon.ca] CyberPower BRG1500AVRLCD UPS (C$149.99) 40% off

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 23rd, 2019 11:36 am
Tags:
None
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 23, 2017
19 posts
30 upvotes

[Amazon.ca] CyberPower BRG1500AVRLCD UPS (C$149.99) 40% off

have been looking for UPS.
Good price! 40% off
5 Years Warranty

55 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 7, 2013
1958 posts
1970 upvotes
Montreal
good price if you need one.
free shipping
5 years warranty.
Last edited by TomRFD on Aug 21st, 2019 10:58 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: updated title
❗ We buy things that we don't need, with money that we don't have, to impress people that we don't like. ❗
Member
User avatar
Dec 1, 2014
253 posts
422 upvotes
Anjou, QC
WARM deal based on the fact that this is a simulated sine wave. In practice it will be fine but true sine wave model is theoretically safer for your equipment.

Save your money for this one instead, paid $156 in November 2018 and I'm sure it will hot that price again at some point, if you're not in a hurry.
CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD PFC Sinewave UPS System, 1500VA/900W, 10 Outlets, AVR, Mini-Tower
JANNIES DO IT FOR FREE
Banned
User avatar
May 15, 2016
7020 posts
2478 upvotes
What is the cheapest sine wave unit?
Sr. Member
Sep 19, 2012
522 posts
272 upvotes
Kitchener
Bought one of these probably 8+ years ago, not sure what happened but when we moved to our newest place, it suddenly started sparking and smoking when I plugged it in. Decided to just chuck it, but it always worked pretty well for me before this.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 2, 2018
1160 posts
1123 upvotes
Blainville, QC
Tumdace wrote: Bought one of these probably 8+ years ago, not sure what happened but when we moved to our newest place, it suddenly started sparking and smoking when I plugged it in. Decided to just chuck it, but it always worked pretty well for me before this.
I usually have stuck to APC (and never had any issues).
Deal Addict
Sep 13, 2016
2868 posts
1633 upvotes
Mississauga
This will not work with PFC computer power supplies I suppose?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 15, 2007
1412 posts
705 upvotes
Canada
DrunkTrailerParkSupervisor wrote: WARM deal based on the fact that this is a simulated sine wave. In practice it will be fine but true sine wave model is theoretically safer for your equipment.

Save your money for this one instead, paid $156 in November 2018 and I'm sure it will hot that price again at some point, if you're not in a hurry.
CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD PFC Sinewave UPS System, 1500VA/900W, 10 Outlets, AVR, Mini-Tower
Completely agree. Simulated sine waves will damage your PC's power supply.
Deal Addict
Sep 16, 2013
2707 posts
1654 upvotes
SW ON
Teletran wrote: Completely agree. Simulated sine waves will damage your PC's power supply.
This is utter nonsense.
Jr. Member
Nov 27, 2018
153 posts
281 upvotes
Do I need two of these, one for my modem and router, and one for my desktop, (maybe need another for home theater, damn too expensive for too many), bought one for now.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 5, 2007
7036 posts
6922 upvotes
DrunkTrailerParkSupervisor wrote: WARM deal based on the fact that this is a simulated sine wave. In practice it will be fine but true sine wave model is theoretically safer for your equipment.

Save your money for this one instead, paid $156 in November 2018 and I'm sure it will hot that price again at some point, if you're not in a hurry.
CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD PFC Sinewave UPS System, 1500VA/900W, 10 Outlets, AVR, Mini-Tower
No. Your equipment will be safe.

If you equipment were sensitive to 'modified sinewave' it would have broken long ago on 'regular' AC power.

TLDR; The first thing ALL switching power supplies do is convert the incoming AC to DC. Whether that AC is 'pure' or not is irrelevant.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 5, 2007
7036 posts
6922 upvotes
vivibaby wrote: What is the cheapest sine wave unit?
Don't waste your money looking for one.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 5, 2007
7036 posts
6922 upvotes
Teletran wrote: Completely agree. Simulated sine waves will damage your PC's power supply.
No, it won't, it's complete bullocks, unless your PC power supply is a linear supply with a massive transformer (we're talking Commodore 64 vintage).

For those interested: linear power supplies use a large 60Hz step down transformer to bring the 120VAC to something usable. The issue is those transformers are optimized for 60Hz. The laminations in the core are designs to minimize the eddy currents that a 60Hz supply induces.

The problem with 'step sign' inverters is the waveform contains much more then just a 60Hz component. A 'square wave', which is basically what these things output (there is a dead period that pulls the waveform away from a pure square wave, but that doesn't really matter) has odd components of the fundemental frequency with a good amount of power.

For example, from:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Square_wave

Image

This is the FFT of a 1000Hz square wave. As you can see, there is a fair amount of power at 1000Hz (expected), but the power levels of the harmonics are quite substantial.

So, for a 60Hz signal, you can expect significant power for many frequencies above 60Hz.

Why does this matter for a linear supply? Almost ALL of that power above 60Hz ends up not transferring to the secondary side. Inside that power goes to directly heating the core of the transformer. Hot transformer = bad.

This DOESN'T affect switching power supplies (pretty much any supply used today) since the first thing they do is take the incoming AC and convert it to DC. This is through the use of diodes (in a full wave rectification structure usually). Diodes are FAST devices, even the slowest rectification diode will not absorb the harmonics as heat, so ALL the energy (almost) coming in gets through to the rest of the supply.

But wait! There is a transformer in switching supplies, SURELY it will be affected?

Nope. After converting to DC there is a switch (maybe that's where the name switching power supply came from...) that 'pulses' the DC into a transformer (for step down, and the added required benefit of galvanic isolation). This switch operates at a frequency independent of the AC supply (usually in the 1kHz-100kHz range). In fact, you could supply almost all switching power supplies used for AC line voltage a high voltage (~160V) DC current, and the supply would work perfectly fine.

For more info:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched- ... wer_supply

There is a trace of truth with PFC concerns. EARLY PFC methods didn't 'like' the step sine waveform. They'd do odd things, often resulting in the supply simply not supplying. But that was ages ago. ANY PFC design that can't handle step sine was thrown in the bin years ago, you won't encounter that.
Last edited by repatch on Aug 21st, 2019 1:10 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Deal Addict
Nov 10, 2018
4164 posts
4362 upvotes
alpovs wrote: This is utter nonsense.
There is a place for pure sine wave UPS's. It's not worth the money for most people's home electronics but for high end said electronics or for a datacenter environment pure sine wave UPS's are the way to go.

Overkill for the vast majority of people's stuff though.
For legal topics and discussions, the opinion, guidance, and thoughts provided are my own and are not considered to be legal advice, in any manner.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Apr 29, 2005
4674 posts
141 upvotes
Markham/GTA
sid8tive wrote: I usually have stuck to APC (and never had any issues).
Same here. I bought another popular brand before, and after a few years it would occasionally beep for no reason. Haven't had any problems with APC.
Tangerine, FreedomMobile, GreatCanadianRebates, Rakuten, Coinbase, Shakepay, Stack
Deal Fanatic
Sep 29, 2005
6069 posts
1331 upvotes
Montreal
Just bought 2 Cyberpower 1000's to replace APC units that died. Granted the units were quite old but the batteries checked with a multimeter were fine.
When I contacted APC tech support, all they really wanted to do was to sell me a new unit.

I rather like CyberPower.
Phils
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 2, 2018
1160 posts
1123 upvotes
Blainville, QC
Phils wrote: Just bought 2 Cyberpower 1000's to replace APC units that died. Granted the units were quite old but the batteries checked with a multimeter were fine.
When I contacted APC tech support, all they really wanted to do was to sell me a new unit.

I rather like CyberPower.
In the end, I think either company will do. Both are used in datacenters, so are equivalent. Both can/will have issues. I would pick either depending on the use-case.
Sr. Member
Oct 17, 2010
846 posts
451 upvotes
Edmonton
Need a deal on a rack mount UPS.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Dec 11, 2004
10231 posts
2836 upvotes
Montreal, QC
For router/modem, if they run on 12V, you may be better off using Lithium 12V UPS, better efficiency than converting 12/24V DC to 120V AC (lower loads result into pretty low efficiency, eg 70%) and then back down to 12V DC (~80%+), so in the end, you'll end up losing like 40%+

Top